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A NEWSFIELD PUBLICATION 
TX: 008 JULY 1988 



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SHOUI 

BULLETIN 

BOARDS 

BE ALLOWED? 

Mel Croucher investigates 



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ENGAGE 
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ISSUES JULY 1988 



THIS ISSUE 



it&mxs 



T PREVIEWS 
12 NEWS 
18 COIN-OP 

CONFRONTATION 
34 MUSIC MATTERS 
U GETTING ADVENTUROUS 



40 COMPETITION RESULTS 

43 REVIEWS 

89 GOING OVERBOARD 
104 FANTASY GAMES 
107 READER CLASSIFEDS 

114 MERCY DASH 

115 PLAY BV MAIL 
119READERPAGE 
121 INFO DESK 
122ENDP9ECE 



FEtfUm 



16 BULLETIN BAWDY 
Mel Croucher investigates 
ihe nefanous side of 
computer bulletin boards 

84 GOING GLOBAL 

Where is your computer most 
popular - TGM spars the 
world in search of the low- 
down 

M TOUR Of THE UNIVERSE 

Marshal T Rosenthal flies the 
Shuttle - the biggest video 
game in the world 

90 TRADING PLACES 

QW labels, ne we compani es : 
John Gilbert explains why 
companies change names 
and identities 

02 IN OUR SIGHT 

Targe! Games and a new 
presents! ion for strategy 

14 HYPE'S IN A NAME 
Companies may change 
names, but why do they pick 



them in the lirst place? 
Bamaby Page tells ail 
97 THE CAMCORDER 
REVOLUTION 
It you want to gel in on the 
Computer & Video game, 
you'll want a camcorder: Mel 
otters some hints on the 
range 

101 BLUE MONDAY 2019 
Stuart Wynne explains the 
new wave multimedia SF 
genre CYBERPUNK 

114 ENGAGE PHOTON DRIVE 
Robin Candy unveils the best 
ever Amiga art utility 



THE CAMCORDER 
REVOLUTION 

Still a yuppie dream, the reality 
of today will be tomorrow's 
commonplace whan computers 
lis down with video. Met 
Croucher advise* on tha new 
generation of Cameortters for 
your Kit PAOB 87 




coMpemow 



28 BATTLECAR MARAUDER 
Celebrate Hewson's latest 
game with radio control 



S3 LIGHT SIDE 

Enter incentive's Dark &de 
and win a home laser show 

42 FOOTBALL MANAGER 2 
Gel to the top of ihe league 
wtth a massive Midi Hi-Fi 
system 



THE MIDGET MONSTER 

It weighs almost nothing, fits a hand and knocks arcade machines 
Into a cocked hat. Will R-TYPE and the PC ENGINE give Nintendo a 
run for Ws money? 
PAGE 28 



Issue 9 of THE GAMES MACHINE goes on sate from Jury 21 - see 
page 122 for details - don't miss it because it will be packed with 
essential features, reviews and articles - as usual! 



4? fr**v mil. tuefe*. fiinyaMnt sr» lOS « OSU WSi/2/3 SeHer Oliver Frej Aaatoba« Eaton Nik w.in Soft**™ &MrtHa*tert fl*bard Frfrjy Staff Wrttan: Rrjbtn Hogg Stuart 
Wjme tatoltJ aatfttaat frwws Mft&e fkoMfnalrf; Cameron Pound, Michael Parkinson (Assistim: Contributor! : .inn K;»h?s. Hctiin r;-tnr|y. Mel Cruncher. Rotun Erans, John Gilbert flbgw Ksan 
Bartuby ?w. Marshal M Snwnihai. Rob Steel. Jnnn woock MWOUCnoa 1/7 King street, iuttiim. Shropshire $r$ iaq is ns*4 5851 /2ft Art Mncter Markw "III! Ill I (lllWllUllHMutM 
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CBMM 128 £9.9$ £14,99(1 

Uf um £7.99 r +3 £12-99 
Aimtnid £9.9* £14.99-: 

Don f t miss these 4 great new 
releases from the creators 
of the most original and 
exciting games of all time. 

£9.9*-£14.99d 
n £7,99- +3 £12-99d 
Am^Md £9.99t £14.99*1 
Arnica £24.99 
AtariSl £19.99d 




M64/12H £9.99i £14.99 
trym £7.99t +3 £i2.99f! 
Amstiad £9.99i £14.99 
Mb* £7 .99* 
Atari ST £19.99 



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Brother* o* * warrior of thr pjit in 

Hi-fi ul.v Slayer of the Djmruil [nt|-r Ihe 

tra/y world of the Pink Panlhef or 

entity two different game* in one with 

Skate Crjo - the "Car Park C halleflge" 

jnd the "Crwrnptcmthip Course. " 



V>8 £9.99i £14.99 
fum £7,99i +3 £12.99 ' 
Am«rad £9.99t - £14,99d 




4.11 mlil ot6ri <-nqumc. lo: C.rrmlin t.rjpbus Soltwjrr lid . AlfihJ Hoil**. 10 Orvff Slreel, StiflfiHd SI MS. 





From a multicoloured past, can the 
historical fragments of the Prism Leisure 
Corporation combine again? The 
company's taken a backseat for a while, 
but this month, with the launch of Football 
Manager II, Prism spearheads a new 
campaign, with some great titles from its 
five entertainment labels, Richard Eddy - 
designer-label specialist - investigates 



Prism Leisure 
Corporation may sound a 
pretentious title if you only 
know its software operation , 
however Prism Is a large 
corporate body witn distribution, 
sales, record labels, 
merchandising and packaging 
covering worldwide leisure 
markets . II has ft history tOO 

In 1960 rt was rnadeslly-named 
Geoff's Records after its chairman 
Geoff Young, n began by 
publishing old record titles deleted 
from the mainstream market, and 
m 1983 created the Platinum 
Music label. 

At the stad of the Spectrum ere 
Prism was born as a marketing 
force, and laier still. Geoff created 
rts first software label. Endurance 
Games, specialising in converting 
games across a range of machines 
and publishing them - the first title 
was International Karate on 
Spectrum and Amstrftd. 

This year Pnsm launched three 
new labels: PC Leisure. ST 
Leisure and Ami?* Leisure the 
aim: to provide 1 6-bit games at the 
budget price of C 12.99, Sadly, the 
first few were poor and never 
mac-e it to the review pages. Prism 
promise ihis is sei to change. Jhm Hot Shot *•«"«* wamm 

Kicking off the new range of ST and Breakout, using vacuum 
and Amiga Leisure products is cleaners, or graviton guns as 

Artificial Dreamt - an original they're known. Set in an arena, 

A comtmatton of n>***/puzz\t *hwt-'«n up m*co*s to mmkm m* 
*Uictn/*Artir>c,MlOrmama-At*rtST scree* 



twist on the vertically scrolling 
shoot- "em- up theme designed 
and written by Maxwell 
Technologies, a development 
house run by John Mpxwell. 
once part of the Masiertronic 
management. He scooped up 
David Jones (Magic Knight, 
Spellbound. SfQrmbnngw) as 
project leader for Artificial 
Dreams and others. 

As the space scenery scrolls 
upward, the object is lo 
manoeuvre a space ship through a 
maze and additional hazards 
Control isetght-directional II isn't 
until AfUficiai Dreams is played 
that you appreciate its highly 
addictive and tactical gamepiay. 
At H 2 -99 it s a snip. 

Also from Maxwell Technology 
is the futuristic sports game Hot 
Shot - a combination of squash 





On* of m* fiv* /rutin Commador* <H pHtytng tcrmmns *n Hot Shot, » frigrtfy 
mddtcttvm pern* - suck it to m* one-limm 



Hot Shot is a two-player game. 
Catch the ball and control it to 
knock score blocks and rebound 
off ihe pmball bumpers. Hot Shot 
is essentially a simple game, well- 
programmed and immensety 
enjoyable. 



Richard Hennerly. Prism's 
PR Manager deems it a wonderful 
combination of action and 
violence", {players can attack each 
other with the plasma bail.) But 
not serious violence . , . almost a 
black comedy sports game, ' he 



KRISTAL CREATIONS 



Is currently working on its biggest software project ever. 
Called The Krtatat, n looks like being the most imaginative piece of 
software dreamed up for a long time. THE GAMES MACHINE will 
be taking a close look at the project, but hare's some exclusive 



The Kri&tai is ihe brainchild of Hike Suttfn whose background 
lies in the music and moods of the Sixties. He was stage manager 
lor dramatic and exceptional stages shows such as Hair and Jesus 
Cfrnst Superstar and also designed the psycehedelic backdrops for 
many of Pink Floyd's concerts, 

The Ketttat was originally designed as a stage show written by 
Mike, but never made it to the theatres even though a full two-hour 
sound track sung by E lame Page and the cast of Hair was recorded . 

Mike, now working with computers, specialises In the 16-bit 
market - primarily Amiga and ST. Working with Mike are two 
animators, one background artist, four coders and a host of others. 
Prism's Export Manager, Mark Pearce, is heavily involved and he 
says of it: ' It is a very Intensive project and very important to an of 
us - we wanl lo show the world that something really special can 
be done. The Kriatal will be a grapnic and sonic masterpiece. The 
Kriataf, right down to the storyline, is magical and very fascinating 
The way Mike lei is H is a real experience 

Stay tuned to THE GAMES MACHINE for the full Story soon as 
told by Mike and his colleagues. 

THE FUTURE FROM 
PRISM 



SPECTRUM 

Hot Shot £7,99 August 

Meteptek £299 June 

COMMODORE 64/128 
Hot Shol £9,99/£l 299 Augual 
Metapiex £2.99/ £890 June 
BirttfeStsbons £2.99 June 

ATARI ST 

Artificial Dreams £1299 Jury 
Ttrrefore* £12,99 July 
Rocks* Roger £12.99 July 
Pub Games £12 99 October 
Hot Shot £1999 August 
The Kriatal £24 99 October 
Arac£ 12.99 November 



AMIGA 

Tenaforce C1289 July 

HoiShoUl9 99Augysl 

AddfctabaH £1 2 .99 September 

Who Oar«Wm»ilCi2 99 September 

Zed £12 99 September 

Rocket Roger £12.99 September 

BattieStatiorw £12.99 September 

AnfflcW Dreamt £12.99 September 

The Knstai £24 99 October 

Trap £1299 October 

Pub Games £12 99 October 

Arse £12.99 November 

IBM PC 

BriJ.IICT99Juf» 

Who Dares WMt II £9.99 September 
BetltoStebon* £9.99 November 
ZsdfAMNovembei 



TGM TX 008:7-887/124 



explains. 'Though Hot Shot has 
only five mam playing screens, 
they am all different and require 
a 'ffef enl tactics to become 
proficient in each. And the bizarre 
collection of alien opponents all 
possess their own particular 
combat capabilities and tactics. ' 
Hot Shot is set tor a lull-price 
mid-August release across 
Commodore ©4'' 12B, Spectrum. 

Amstrad CPC . Atari ST. Amiga and 
IBM PC formats. 



Leisure labels at £ 12.99. 

In addition to Maxwell 
Technology. Prism also has 
AJIlgata now working for ihem, 
producing most of their STVAmiga/ 
PC Leisure trties - so old favountes 
make 16-bit appearances. 
including Who Dares Wins II. 
Zed, Trap Addictabaft and Put 
Games as well as some original 
titles like BaWeStations. a cross- 
fire shooi-'em-up 

AJIigata were the right team to 



T*rraforca: Flying infrom Prism late* this year - Atari ST screen 




Back to the ST and Am<ga for 
Tarratorc* in August - at the 
moment in its early stages It's an 
exciting flight through tour 
sideways scrolling screens, 
including passage across sky and 
seascapes. Fight the ban ling 
aliens with four weapons to reach 
The Void for an all out 
amramgeddon stnke (SO it says 
here J Tarraforca >s scheduled 
for release on the ST and Amiga 



produce games for the Leisure 
range. ' enthuses Henneriy. 
'Though most are conversions 
from fl-bit games, the price-point 
la just right - while many 
companies are releasing any old 
thing on the 16-bdlers and 
bashing it out at 20, 2 5 quid , we are 
happier producing a decent game 
at a decent once: £1 2.99 - or 
£9,99 for the PC range ' 




HAWKEYE 

THE N00 

Not a brain between them, doesn't sound 
like a recipe for software success, but 
THALAMUS isn't bothered. The company 
dived into the Europool to drag a four-man 
Dutch development team called Boys 
Without Brains screaming into the UK 
limelight 



It's their first game, ifs been 
in development for almost a 
year, it's called Hawkaya-. 
For the Bey* Without 
Brains it's an exciting 
moment. This isn't the first time 
Thalamus has relied on Europe 
for its programmers - Stavros 
FasouiasiSarwon, Delta. Quedex) 
is Finnish, and he actually 
i ntroduced the Boys to Thalam u s . 
For the record, they are: Marfo 
Van Z*f*t (coder]. J»c co Van <T 
Riet (coder) . Artur Van Jo I* 
(graphics) and J«ro*n Tel 
(sound). 

Haw*raye is for the Commodore 
64/1 26 (surprise!), and features 1 2 



levels of horizontally scrolling 
arcade combat action similar to 
Rasters - but Havtkaya features 
excellent parallax scrolling 
between the fore-, middle- and 
background screen layers. 
In Hawkaya's you battle 
Ihrough the 12 levels, controlling 
the actions of the heroically- 
bronzed figure (as yet unnamed) 
searching for a four -piece PuZZte 
on each level. Collecting the 12 
puzzles enables the character to 
revert from his currenl robot state 
to his more normal human body- 
Each level has its own individual 
theme, ranging from the wild west 
to. what looks like, a crumbling 



High noon for H«wfc*y* in tha mtkt 
Commodor* 94 m crm m n 



ancient Roman city - however, as 
familiar as these settings may be, 
the inhabitants are not . . . 
pr&hislonc crealures, giant 
scorpions and other extras from 
The Land That Time Forgot are 
foes to fear, as well as smaller 
creatures flying around the screen. 
Watch out for ball -monkeys, 
which curl up into spheres up and 
hurl themselves into the air, 

You are provided with four 
different weapons for combat at 

77» scanty lands Htwk*y* * hand 




a? the qo>t At fr approaches ■ 



theoulset, but maintaining a good 
supply of ammunition Is a 
problem. 

Thalamus Managing Director 
Paul Coopar who signed up the 
boys at last year's PCW Show, is 
pleased at Iheir achievement; 'The 
whole package is very impressive, 
graphically , sonically - and it plays 
well. The parallax effect is bniitant 
and just goes to prove that the 
Commodore's hardware can still 
be pushed even further. It's good 
io be producing a game from a 
learn new to the business. They're 
new blood with fresh ideas. ' 

With a provisional release date 
of late- July, Hawkeye will be 
available on both cassette (£9.99) 
and disk (including a selection of 
demos - £12.99). An Amiga 
version is a possibility later on. 
Also coming soon from Thalamus 
is Amourtita from Cybadyne 
Syetema, but more news of that 
in the months io come. 



IN PRODUCTION 



TURNING TURTLE 

THREE arcade games and an 
'intelligent' American chess 
package marks the relum of 
business software publisher 
Logotrofi. They entered the 
leisure side of software last year 
wiih Xor. have been quiet since, 
and are now ready to hit with three 
arcade action games and . . . 

Sargon ii. a chess package, 
developed in Amenea, Logoiron 



say it's the best ever, with 68.000 
Opening moves and 1 07 classic 
games and it has taken 21 man- 
years to develop. Imminent 
release for Commodore 64/128, 8 
bit Atari, IBM PC. Amiga and Alan 
ST. 

StarRay kicks off the 16-bit 
product range - a horizontally 
scrolling shoot- 'em- up. n" makes 
use of an impressive parallax 
scrolling routine. As ft stands, 
StarRay is looking like a real tester 



8/124TGM TX 008:7-88 




Junglg jcnw from ana of the seven levels in StarRay - Amiga screen 



for players with itchy trigger 
fingers and a good ear for sound; 
there's a neat theme tune and 
some vicious explosions, it was 
programmed in Germany by 
HMdaw Treasure* and has 
already been warmly received 
there- full story on the Amiga next 
month. Other 1 versions of StarRay 
to watch out for are Atari ST, 
Commodore 64/ 128 and IBM PC 
(that should be interesting '). 

And if you're looking for 
programming names, Logjotron 
have snapped up two of the best 
16-bH programmers - Graham 
■Kenny* Ivnrett and graphics 
man Stove Cain (Frankie Goes To 
Hotywood and. more recently 
Black Lamp for Firebird.) Their 



the way the ship gathers intertia 
and rolls around the planet surface 
is excellent. Atari ST and Amiga 
versions will be out In August 
(E1 9 95} and a PC game to follow 
in September, 

Last Quadratien written by 
Astral Software - their first 
product for the Atan ST and Amiga 
- combines arcade action with 
strategy so while you're 
wandenng around the vast 
graphical complex of Astra 
disposing of as many alien forces 
as possible, the other brain- 
draining task is to use all six robots 
at your disposal to sort out a 
nuctear-nsslon plant which has 
gone Out Of control and prevent it 
melting down. 




* g andet a i Star Goose the latest game from Qrehem 'Kenny ' Crtrtff and 

FURIOUS . . . 7 

... OR iust plain hoppm' mad? 
Elite certainty is wrfh the late- 
June release Hoppin' Mod Take 
control of four balls all at once and 
guide them through forest and 
beach scenes bouncing over 
cacti, ducking the birds and bees 
and a host of other prickly 
characters - certainty a deflating 
experience, on the Commodore 
64/1 28 and Spectrum, review next 
month. 

it s all GO! with C apcom as 
more arcade conversions come 



litest protect is Star Goos*. it's 
set for a 16-bit launch mrhally. On 
the bizarre world of Nom. you are 
the ptkjt of a ground-Skimming 
vehicle pitched against a variety of 
defences forces in culverts, 
tunnels and on the plains of the 
strange planet 

it was inspired. 1 says Graham. 
" by the kind of car race, often seen 
in movies, where the cars race 
around a basin-like track with 
Curved Sides. At first Star Goose 
was intended to be a first -person- 
perspective race-game travelling 
through a series of lunneis But we 
weren't happy with me overall 
effect so we've switched the view 
to an overhead • from -behind one ; 
it makes the action much more 
•feMe' 

It is difficult to appreciate Star 
Gwaafrom the static screen shot, 




PREVIEWS 



under the hammer: yet more 
versions of the smashing Bianic 
Commando (TGM007 86%). 
pictured here is the Atari ST 
version - also to come are 
Amstrad CPC and Amiga versions . 
Also, take a took at the ST version 
of Street Fighter, hitting the 



Commodore 64/1 28, Amstrad 
CPC and 16-brt machines are 
expected in the summer . . 

And next month the Preview 
Department has something 
special for you , . . We are 
zooming off hi search of some hot 
Capcom news straight from the 




Oft theAtanST th<* graphics are practically the same as the coin-op ver&on of 
Stroii t Fighter tram Capcom 



shops soon. On the brand -new 
rroni are conversions of the 
vertically scrolling fighter plane 
shoot- 'em -up 1943 closely 



Stales, with the low-down on new 
Capcom arcade machines which 
are making their debuts late this 
year and inf ormatkMi on when you 




1943: the year after, and H * still just « tovgh in tha nkimm - Atari ST mcreen 



followed by Black Tiger : The latter 
places you in a mystical land full of 
demonic creatures; if you can 
rescue a few dainty damsels from 
the dangerous grasp of a trio of 
vicious dragons, you're a winner. 
Conversions onto Spectrum, 

The hero of Black Tiger mt the begin- 
ning of his quest through a mystical 
(and - Spectrum screen 



can expect to be playing them on 
the small screen. The exclusive 
Capcom Countdown feature is 
part and parcel of TGMO09 



ROCK DA HOUSE 



THERE'S no cha 

hobbit quite yet 

Hdui« 

The Rings .il.f 



Me 



kicking the 
I bourn* 
rriLortfOf 
i eel for a 




TGM TX 009:7-889/124 



PREVIEWS 



late- summer release on Alan ST. 
Amiga and IBM PC and major 8-tM 
conversions planned tor 
September. Very Irttie information 
about the game itself as yet but 
there's always the screen 
shots . . . 

The ever expanding Binary 
Design (new office in Bristol . new 
graphics studio, Andy Hieke's 
watstkne ...), have just 
completed VectorbsH up for 
reteaac soon by Maatertronle 
across Spectrum, Amstrad GPG. 
Cornmodore 64/1 2S. Alan ST, 
Am»ga and IBM PC formats. 
VectorttaU is a two-player 
futuristic soccer game on a pitch 
with vector-drawn hills and 
valleys. Both players take control 
of a robot and try and gain 
possession of a ball to push it into 
the goalmouths either end Of the 
prtch The prtch scrolls diagonally 
(except on the Commodore 64/ 
1 28 where a flip-screen technique 
is used) and is smooth on all 
versions. 

However, while the S-brt 
graphics are all displayed as 
vector line drawings, the 1 6-brts 
are more colourful as Nkk 
Vincent, Project Manager 
explains: " On the ST and Amiga we 
have used an intensity shaded 
pitch, us*ng eight venations on one 
colour, to display the hilis and 
vaieys. The robots were drawn as 
vector graphics and filled by the 
computer and a light source was 
added using Vtdeoscape 3-D. ' 

Complete with sampled theme 
tune and sound effects. 
Ir'ecfonbaJ'ts on your screens 
soon costing £2 99 on 8 -bit and 
C9,99on1fH>n. 

DEEPER DUNGEONS 

■KLANG. thud, spurt (•). 
Aaaaa/gh 1 ' says the press release, 
and well it might too as it 
announces the amval ol 
Barbarian H: The Dungeon Of 
DrtM from Palace Software. Bit 
of a difference this time since 
Princess Mariana (Maria 
Whrttakeri forms part of the 
fighting learn alongside Barbarian 
(Mike Van Myjk) - the player can 
choose who to control. Like the 
original. Barbarian it features 
great gameplay, gory animation 
and another helping of Richard 
Jo a aph's atmospheric sound FX 
The garne is multitoad, ana has 
s large mappable playing area of 
around 60 screens, complete with 
a bevy of char acterf uily gothic 
monsters adding a black comedy 
feel. It will be available in August 
for the Commodore 64/1 26, 
Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST 
and Amiga. 

LANKHOR UFT OFF 

FRENCH software is growing 
more popular in Britain, and it's 
hardly surprising - they do have a 
knack for producing original ideas. 
Now software house Lankhor is 
due to enter the UK market this 
June thanks to the marketing. 
sales and distn but ion firm Active 
One of the first games is a cult 
French adventure called 




Ar9yot>3imrycotrrtortabiy?Thi*p#*C*tvlSc9r>eb&wliw*<Xmtafoaowin 
a^orfyi^ee Manor, en adventure frOOJ Lenkti&r 



Mortiviile Manor, which won 
three top awards »n the big French 
computer magazine Tift. It's a 
mysterious C/uedo-styled 
adventure in classic whodunnit 
guise, which combines text and 
speech to help the adventurer 
through a murder inquiry. 
Available for Atari ST and Amiga by 
the time you read this, i is pnced at 
E24.95. fn October there is the 
&#&&- Maupitt Island 

GWusfJuly, Atari ST, £1 9.95)is 




G'orus on th* ST. from Lsnkhor 



a cartoon arcade game featuring 
robots pushing each others about 
and knocking: down walls. And 
also m July we'll see of what 
Lankhor can do with the 
(Commodore 64/128 in Not, an 
intngulng animated graphic 
adventure making use of the 
WIMP environment With 1 1 
beautifully drawn locations, the 
objective is to kill a strange aien 
being before it kills you. 

Vroom is an aptly titled car- 
racing game set on some of the 



CLASH OF THE TTTUS 

TITUS is the company which gave 
us Crazy Cars and with hands still 
firmly on ihe wheat, the next game 
is Fin And Forget, You're behind 
the steering wheel of Thunder 
Master, a lour- wheel-drive vehicle 
equipped with tnppie turbo engine 
and an arsenal of sophisticated 
weaponry. The object is to blast a 
path through enemy territory 
avoiding mines, hidden bunkers, 
helicopters and tanks. The action 
i$ somewhat akin to Roadbfasters 
Out soon on Commodore 64/128, 
Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, AtanSf, 
Amiga, IBM PC formats. 

After Tynesoft s Winter 
Olympiad comes, naturally 
enough, Summer Olympiad 
featunng five events - Skeet 
Shooting, Fencing. Hurdles. 




Sutlffxr Olympiad - Atari ST 



Tnppie Jump and High Diving, The 
whole package should be ready 
for a July release to tie in suitably 

with I his year's Olympic Games. 




Volt* Vroom, lejomogrendprfw. Coat (/*• bntt 



world's most hazardous courses. 
Complete with music and 
smashing sound FX, Vroom has a 
September release date on the 
Atari ST priced at £19.95, 



Says Development Manager 
David Croft*, 'We've tried to 
throw a new angle i nto each event , 
depicting them different ly from t he 

usual sports simulation. For 



example, the hurdles event ts 
viewed from behind the runner so 
the track comes hurtling towards 
me player, ' 

Planned formats are 
Commodore 64/126, Spectrum. 
Amstrad CPC, Alan ST. Amiga and 
IBM PC 

Tynesoh also has some US film 
licences, first being Superman. 
which is m development here and 
over in the States, You should be 
able to see if at the PC Show , Earl's 
Court , m September: r ai eas e for all 
popular formats m November. 

AT-AT ATTACK 

DOMARK landed a lucky deaf 
with Star Wars, because they 
got all three blockbuster Lucas 
films thrown In. The second in 
the trilogy, due for July, The 
Empire Strikes Back (Spectrum, 
Amstrad CPC, Commodore. BBC, 
Atari ST and Amiga) is also 
licensed from Atari's coin-op as 
was Star Wars. It's a one-player 
game controlling Luke 
Skywalker's snowspeeder and 
later Han Solo's Miilenrum Falcon. 
Split into four levels, the first is a 




Wmiking fA* A T-A T m no fun for the 
f)rt>*t Athene* - $poctrvm 

battle on the planet Hoth. then a 

DHillfi OQSrflS* trMj AT t AT And AT* 

ST walkers, followed by ajaunl in 
Millenium Falcon fighting against 
a swarm of Tie fighters Finally the 
asteroid bell approaches, you fly 
through it to reach your objei ■ 
the asteroid planet. Trie empire 
Strike* Back is displayed in 
vector graphics like Star Wars and 
programmed, funnily enough, by 

Viktor Gr.fi m. 

ONE P'TAITO, TWO 
P'TAITO 

OCEAN'S conversion of Taito's 
Operation Wolf, we previewed 
last month for B-btl formats, so 
here's the ST version, The 
graphics have been taken directly 
from the a/cade machine - as you 
can see from the screen shot, 
they're impressive. The game Uself 
isasm stage target shoot -em up 
and is set for a September release, 
Also on the Ocean/Taito front is 
the forthcoming ST conversion of 
Arkanold tl: Revenge Of Doh a 
great 8- bit game Both will cost 
£19.95. 



Bouncing beck from 
op, her* cornea 



the TeHe coin- 
Of Doh 






10/124TGM TX 008:7-88 






Muctoar mictions 

tromLogotron. 

Qifdr»li*n-At*riST 



IIbTP 


■li^ B?^ 


fflWWSa 

II'II'l 1 

Tt ■ 


P.il** r ~ 

Bit '^ 

Sir 

■?«V ■■■22 1 




111 


jf 


irrji u 
lllj 



Powerplay's new 
tough Joysticks 



YOU NEED a reliable |oystick to 
win in today's difficult-to-master 
games, and Power Ray reckon 
they have the tools for the job of 
eliminating marauding aliens with 
two new joysticks. 

Both joysticks complement 
PowerPlay's successful Cruiser 
range, in fad Cruiser Black is the 
original design except tor it? totally 
black casing and er gonorrheal ly 
flat- topped stick. The second. 
Cruiser Clear, is housed in a clear 
case and has autofrre when one of 
lhe two fire buttons is heid down. 



All three are British produced 
(apart from the Atari plugs) and 
feature a solid steel rod in the 
cenlre of the stick and sensitive 
but robust microswitches. Over 
25,000 units of the Cruiser original 
ha^e been sold and to date only 50 
have been found f auity. 

The Cruiser Original and Black 
retail (VAT Inclusive} for £9.90, the 
Clear sells for £ 12.99. More 
information and orders can be 
obtained by wmirtg to PowerPlay , 
Unit 2, Rothersthorpe Avgmue 
Trading Estate. Northampton 
NW4 9JH 




Cyberpunk wave 
gets into 
overdrive 



COINCIDENTAL with this 
month's cyberpunk feature (page 
101) is the release of jWona Usa 
Overdrive, the concluding part in 
William Gibson's highly acclaimed 
cyberspace 'sequence' - the 
Other books being Neuromancer 
and Count Zero. The new book 
lakes characters from the 
preceding, apparently 

unconnected novels and adds 
some new ones - such as the 
daughter of Yakura crimelord - to 
produce an exceptionally original 
tniogy, Pnce is £10.95 in Victor 
Geftancz hardback, with the 
preceding books now out as 



Grafton paperbacks. 

In Hollywood meanwhile it has 
been announced thai the film 
version of New Rose Hotel, (a 
short story from Gibson's Burning 
Chrome anthology), is to be 
directed by Kathryn Bigetow. Her 
last movie was the controversiaJ 
Near Dark which provided an 
exceptionally stylish reworking of 
the vampire mythology. Filming is 
due to begin this autumn with most 
principal photography taking 
place m Japan. The film's score is 
to be done by Malcolm McCleran. 
the former Sex Pistols' manager. 




Tttm AMS DTP Solution ktt 

AMS touts 
DTP pack 

MOUSE manufacturer AMS has 
launched the first mass- market 
desktop-publishing (DTP) 

package' for PC-XT and AT 
compatibles. 

Managing Director Nick 
Pearson said DTP Solution - 
which comprises a mouse, 
handheld scanner and finesse 
DTP software at £447.35 - will 
allow more people 1o use DTP. 
which up h\\ now has been the 
expensive preserve of larger 
businesses. 

DTP software such as AMSs 
finesse allows users to design 
pages of taxi and pictures 
onscreen, placing them m multiple 
columns like a magazine - 
whereas most word- processing 
packages will only produce texi 
that prints in a single column 
across the page, like a book. 

The text is written on a word 
processor such as MicroPro's 
Wtordsfar and the finished file is 
then 'imported' into the DTP 
program; there's no retyping. 

The DTP software can also 
produce different styles and sizes 
of type for use in headlines and so 
on. Finesse has three basic type 
styles which can be used in sizes 
from e pon: - mm txg to 72 point, 
which is about an inch high. 

Like most popular DTP 
packages, Finesse is described as 
WYSIWYG - what you see is what 
you get', meaning that the page 
appears onscreen exactly as it will 
be printed. 

And, again like most of its peers. 
Finesse is controlled with a mouse 
which selects commands from 
onscreen options Apple 
Macintosh-style, rather than 
keyboard input. 

The AMS Serial Mouse supplied 



-cost 



in the DTP Solutions package was 
the firm 5 firsl major product, and 
Pearson says it setts around 3.000 
per month. 

The handheld AMS Microscan 
scanner is used 1o scan images - 
photographs, cartoons, charts etc 
- turn them into dig Hal data which 
the PC can handle and pui them 
on the monitor screen, where they 
can be fitted into a page and 
printed Out- 
It produces black-and-white 
pictures with a resolution of 200 
dots per inch, from colour or 
black-and-white originals The 
scanner's head is i0&mm wide - 
just over 4 inches - which means 
images wider then that have to be 
scanned in sections, which can 
create rxoblerrts 

DTP Solution compares well on 
cost with is competitors, though 
versatile PC DTP software can be 
obtained for as little as £68 95 
(Potyrom's oft ■recommended 
NewsMastet}. and Epson's Image 
Scanner for £224.25 - bqth those 
products cost less than their AMS 
counterparts. 

On their own, F/nesse is 
£t 13.85. the AMS Serial Mouse 
with the software it needs is 
£79,35 and the AMS Microscan 
with its software >s £286.35 

DTP Solution runs on the IBM 
PC-XT and AT and 100% 
compatibles. And for good- 
looking results you'll also need a 
laser printer, which can cost 
anything from £316.25 (the Epson 
DC- 800) to the earth 

All pnees in this article include 
VAT. 

AMS (Advanced Memory 
Systems); Warrington (0925) 
413501 



Whose show is it 
anyway? 



Commodore Business Machines 
(UK) is announcing satisfactory 
sales figures for the Amiga range 
of computers internationally - 
some 40.000 units m Britain. 
600,000 worldwide. But 

arguments as to who is doing best 
■n the United States have been 
solved by ihe composition of this 
year's CES {Computer and 
Electronics Show) in Chicago. 
Nintendo of America Inc have 



not only taken over most of the 
hotel rooms where the show is 
held, but so many of ihe exhibition 
stands - whkch they sublet to third - 
party software publishers - that 
the standing joke m Chicago is that 
the CES is appearing at the 
Nintendo Show. 

Marshal T Rosenthal Is In 
Chicago now for the show, and will 
be reporting in full in next month's 
issue 



12 124TGM TX 008:7-88 




r J 



N /J 



SArmiLS Y 




INTERNATIONAL 




RANDSLAM 



ATARI ST + 
AMIGA £19.95 






AVAILABLE FROM JUNE ONWARDS £8.95 



CBM CASS £9.95 
CBM DISK £14.95 



AMSCA5S £8.95 
AMS DISK £14,95 



Write now for your copy of 

PETER BEARDSLEY'S 
INTERNATIONAL FOOTBALL 

Post and Packaging FREE ! to: 
Grandslam Entertainments, Units 1 & 2, 

Conlon Developments, Watery Lane, 

Darwen, Lancashire, BB3 2ET 

orPhorw: 01 247 6434 our Credit Card Hotline. 



SPECTRUM £8.95 
MSX £8.95 



rollers 



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Whether you re going into town for a bita ; 
to eat or a look round the shops, there's one 
thing you can't afford to be without. 

A Midland LIVE'Cash Card 

You Can use it at any Midland AutoBank 
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,au are aged 14*20, you can open a 
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Just call in at your nearest Midland Bank 
and fil) m an application form. Or call free on 
0800 400 469 for written details 



* MIDLAND 




BULLETIN BAWDY 



The passion for Bulletin Boards is hotting up - 
and it's passion that's running riot. But, as Mel 
Croucher uncovers, the lush undergrowth of 
tangled passion flowers hides some nasty 
beasts 




If prostitution is 'the oldest 
profession', then advertising 
such forbidden fruit Is the 
second oldest Since the 
Serpent pinned up a notice 
reading old devil wishes fa meet 
naked women to swap knowledge in 
exchange for apple' bulletin boards 
haven't changed much, although 
today we are more likely to make use 
of a telephone plugged Into an Apple. 

Discreet little clay notices have 
been found in the petrified ruins of 
ancient Pompeii which (ran slate along 
the lines 'Strict nanny tor discipline'. 
'French polishing given 1 and 'private 
massage service available from 
willing slaves'. Excavations on the 
island of Crete have unearthed 3.000- 
yeaf-oid bulletin boards offering the 
services of mercenary soldiers, houns 
advertised their favours in Persia by 
displaying erotic statues in their 
doorways and m old Cathay there was 
a highly organised system of intimate 
escort agencies catering for all tastes, 
ki 1962. the Bdi Telephone 
Corporation of America were looking 
for ways to entice subscribers to 
spend even more hours running up 
the* phone bills, and came up with 
the notJOn of something called The 
Private Party -line. Human nature 
being what it is, these dtsi-a-heavy- 
brearher services soon degenerated 
into a mass market for lonely hearts, 
sex-starved singles and unsavoury 
perverts, In 1973. the US 
Telecommunications Authority tried, 
and fatted, to control so-called 



specialist services, where callers 
could dial up a whole range on one-to- 
one conversations and talk dirty 

Here in the good old United 
Kingdom, we didn't catch on until thr» 
Eighties, with services like the 
headline- hitting Perty-Une and 
Taikabout If you dial up any of the 
more 'specialist' services today, you 
are more than likely to be conned Into 
listening to a recorded message. 
Conine Russel (the Vixen girl) tells me 
that when she takes part in the ' Dial a 
Page-Three Girl" phone lines, far from 
whispering erotic naughtiness inl o the 
caller's earholes, all you get is a 
prerecorded interview of her burbling 
on about her favourite things. 'I'm on 
the cusp of Scorpio and Sagittarius, 
and I love wearing black . . , (yawn). 

ft is only when telephones are 
connected to computer modems that 
things really start to get intriguing. The 
computerised bulletin board is last 
becoming the favourite market place 
for advertising dubious taste. 

When you rub your modem up 
against an exotic stranger, with 
nothing between you except several 
hundred miles of cable and the phone 
bill, sometimes, [ust sometimes 
gentle reader, wonderful things 
happen In your search for true love, 
eternal happiness and the odd bit of 
sex. Once upon a time - and this is no 
fairy story - Deputy Qawg was all 
alone in his sparse bedroom, trawling 
for companionship m the deep waters 
of Prestel's Micronet 800, when he 
met the girl of his dreams, the one and 



only Busy Luvie Electronic romance 
blossomed, and before many nights 
had passed, declarations of love were 
pasted all over the bulletin boards. 
When they met in the flesh, to coin a 
phrase. Deputy Da wo and Susy Uzzte 
made two important decisions. One: 
they decided to get married Two; they 
promptly cancelled their Micronet 
subscriptions 1 This is by no means an 
isolated incident A few weeks ago 
Jhary the Wizard married The Vampire 
fnehan/ress as a direct result oMrymg 
to murder one another on several 
occasions- They met through the cult 
roleplaying game Shades (TGM0QT). 
and If rumours are to be believed they 
can make the Earth move simply by 
teieporting to another planet and 
blowing it up, 




The com- 
puterised bul- 
letin hoard is 
fast becoming 
the favourite 
marketplace 
for advertising 
dubious taste. 



nut for every tale of happiness that I 
Dtiave come across, there are a 
hundred incidents of deceit, 
corruption, and cnminal incitement, fl 
gives me no pleasure to report that 
lestenng away deep down among the 
bulletin boards there are some highly 
unpleasant pits; ranging from Nazi 
propaganda in West Germany, 
organised racism in the Stales, child 
prostitution in France, and gay- 
bashing in Britain. 

John Waiibridge is the founder of 
the Bulletin Board Association of 
Great Britain, and he has recently 
been quoted as saying They can be 
abused, but I would hate to see them 
singled out for censorship They ere 
largely used by teenagers and they 
are prey to all sorts of harmful 
influences. It's hard to say what 
people might get up to. ' 

As a matter of fact, Mr Wallbodge. 
It's not hard at all to say what people 



1&124TGM TX 006:7-88 



nrtght gei up to It's dead easy. And 
what is mora, there ia precious little 
thai anyone can do about it. British 
Telecom are responsible under 
Section 43 Of the 

Telecommunications Act of 1 984 to 
triform the police when they discover 
'a person who sends a message or 
other matter that is grossly offensive. 
indecent, obscene or menacing'. Bui 
when a group of paedophiles (trial's 
people who promote sex with 
children? were busted for using a 
bulletin board of contact lists for illegal 
sen with k ids. the police were unable 
to lake acl ton'. 

There are three mam reasons for not 
being able to control such uses of 
bulletin boards. One, users are often 
anonymous, two, you can say 
anything you like on a private line 
between consenting adults; three, 
nobody has got the lime or money to 
monitor the damn things. 



. . . within 

Desire callers 

are positively 

encouraged to 

transmit the 

electronic 

equivalent of 

lavatory wall 

graffiti. 



Germany neo-Nazi groups are 
infesting bulletin boards with 
propaganda against Jews, blacks and 
homosexuals. In France the state-run 
Mintel viewdata service has been 
successfully adopted by prostitutes 
selling I heir wares, including both 
male and lemaie persons under l he 
legal age of consent. 

I spenl a night checking out two 
British chatime options, the Teiemap 
network known as Teletatk. and the 
open-to- al I -comers network 

advertised as Desire I logged on for 
exactly the same amount of time, I had 
exactly the same conversations using 
exactly (he same vocabulary and then 
I checked up on who was monitoring 
my private conversations. Now I don't 
give a monkey's about what both of 
these outfits print on their rate cards 
of charges, and how they advertise 
their services, this is what happened 
lor real: 



As for I he monitoring aspect, 
Teletatk does indeed have some 
shady grey ghosts overseeing what 
goes on, but as the amount of traffic 
increases monitoring becomes 
unworkable. However, there are a 
number ol real safeguards m the 
system, Firstly, paying subscribers 
are supposed to be over 1 8, secondly 
conversations are self monitoring, and 
whoever is 'in charge" of a private 
location or conference or chat has the 
ability to throw out any participant 
who gets abusive or obscene. 

With Desire things are different. 
The whole marketing strategy 
concerns the exploitation of young 
people's loneliness and some 
mythical quest for immediate real 
friendships. Indeed, there is a specific 
location within Desire where callers 
are positively encouraged to transmit 
the electronic equivalent of lavatory 
wall graffiti, 



-%<* 









TELfTALK 


DESIHE 




COST 


av i 'ictii 


av £19.90 pot hour 




PASSWORD REOUlflED 


rcs 


NO 




frOTlCEBuAPD FACILITY 


YES 


YES 




PfWACY 


AVAILABLE IF REQUIRED 


NOT ENCOtlRAGfn 




SERIOUS 








CONVERSATIONS 


ABOUT 40% 


ABOUT IDS 




WrTTY WORDS RFT.ffVFO 


AFFW 


A GREAT MANY 




DWTVWOflOSSEKT 


THROWN OUT OF 
LQCATW 


NO RESPONSE 


' 


AOVCEQNPREGNANCV 


GIVEN A PHONE NUMBER 


GIVEN A PHONE DUMBER 




ADVICE ON DRUGS 


DISCONNECTED 


GIVEN A PHONE NUMBER 


m 


REQUEST FOR LEGAL SFX 


APPOINTMENT MADE 


NO RESULT 


m 


REQUEST FOR ILLEGAL SEX 


NNECTED 


USE DISCONNECTED 




REQUEST FtlH FIREARMS 


LINE DISCONNECTED 


MISUNDERSTOOD 




REQUEST FOR PENPAL 


THROWN OUT Or 
LOCATION 


VES 



Recently , The Observer newspaper 
uncovered a particularly nasty 
mollusc under a particularly nasty 
stone His name is Darren Ingram, 
and his bulletin board services is 
named Corrupt Computing , operating 
out of his mum's house in Ekoofcskle 
Avenue, Coventry. A selfconiessed 
hate' of gays, 1 6-year-old Darren has 
already provided the foUowing 
services for anyone with a modem: 
ho* to stop the emergency services 
from getting to the scene of an 
accident, the Top Ten ways to kill a 
cop, how to firebomb 'jerks at school \ 
how to shoplift now to make 
nitroglycerine and how lo make riot 
shields really f"'mg bum." Now 
young Darren will say that all this 
information can be found in public 
libraries, but old Met will repty mat 
ii&ranes do not have two-way 
conversations that encourage 
children to kill people and send money 
to help corrupt'. 

Overseas, bulletin boards have 
slotted in to the traditional hobbies of 
Ins natives- Throughout the USA the 
White-Supremacist morons of the Ku 
Kk» Kian ate recruiting kids via 
bulletin board networks to racial 
hatred against blacks. They are 
protected by cleverly shielded closed 
user groups and B*g Money. In West 



The Ku Klux 
Klan are 
recruiting kids 
via bulletin 
board net- 
works to racial 
Hatred against 
blacks. 




I suppose that various readers will 
conclude totally different attractions 
or repulsions to that Utile analysis, 
depending on your proclivities, but 
nobody can argue with the phone 
charges whereby one night of fruity 
conversation could leave you 
bankrupt! 



But these commercial bulletin 
boards are pretty harmless stuff, it is 
the private networks where moat of 
the danger festers. Fortunately, 
computing has given birth to our very 
own guardians of justice as well as 
our very own outlaws; the hackers. In 
February of this year, a group of Dure h 
hackers working for the Qreen 
network got so Incensed by bulletin 
boards offering weapons and 
weapons training thai they blew its 
tiny silicon mind by patching it into the 
local police HO. 

Multinationals have also had their 
noses tweaked Last Christmas, an 
IBM employee got so frustrated with 
the garbage floating around the 
corporate bulletin boards that she 
seeded a neat little worm into Ihe 
system The worm appeared as a 
Christmas Card on hot boss's 
monitor , and at the same time sucked 
in his entire contact list, ft then 
replicated rtseff to that list, sucking in 
all of their contacts, and spreading 
seasonal cheer throughout the planet 
Unconfirmed rumours from within 
IBM suggest that the system broke 
down totally in West Germany, and 
was reduced to a crawl here in the UK 
1 sincerely hope that that's no fairy 
tale In the meantime, to Deputy Dawg 
and Susy Uzzra t and to Jhary the 
Wizard and T7w Vampire 
Enchantress, may you have every 
happiness, and may the blessings of 
the bulletin board bring you never- 
ending multiple 

LINE DISCONNECTED, SWINE 
HASN'T PAID HIS PHONE BILL 



TGM TX 008:7-8817/124 



ARCADES 



r 




COIN 
CONFRONTATION 



Bleeding dry THE GAMES MACHINE'S petty 
cash box, Robin Hogg feeds Blackpool 
coin-slots in a doomed attempt to keep 
them quiet 



The action continues through 
jones Containing giant ice 
asteroids crashing together, a 
space fortress ot narrow condors, 
twisting passageways and rapidly 
closing bSastdoors to name but a 



NEWS 
SLOT 

BOLTEO-ON GLASSES will 
provide ihnii$ soon, as the UK 
coin-op scene is taken by storm 
with the latest Tatto racing game. 
It's called Continental Circus and 
uses a pair ot 3-D glasses fixed to 
the cabinet to correct the 3-D 
effect on screen. Away from the 
freeway and back lo Grand Pnx 
orcuits. it's an impressive game in 
play, with great sound FX and 
loads of graphical treats. 3-D 
glasses aren't new, but rarely have 
they graced a game this good 
Does this mean we will see a 
wholly new type of coin-op 
emerging next year? 

But success breads problems, 
and Tatte has had its share, worst 
recertify with counterfeit copies ot 
I he shoot- 'em -u p Opera Won Wott 
going by the name Of Operation 
Sear Tatto has already taken legal 
action against one European 
company as a result, it isn't the 
iirst nme Taito has suffered m this 
way. illegal copies were made of 
Rastan Sag* and Kick And Run 

SNK are soon releasing 
Fighting Soccer - not a coin-op 
about hooligans, but the fast and 
funous sport ttsetf, Two other 
cabinets to look for are Cipcoms 
F1 Draam- entering arcades now 
- and Sega 5 Wot Rod, which 
should be on playtest in ma jot 
arcades around the UK soon. 

VULCAN 
VENTURE 

Konami 



N 



emeus smashed arcades in 
1985 - a success 
phenomenal, Salamander 
followed the year later, 
further advancing the 
Nemesis cause, with dual- player 
action, horizontally- scrolling 

screens and some later- level 
motherships which even now give 
some coin-ops a run for their 
money- Third in the series, Vulcan 
Venture, is now upon us 

It continues from where the 
others left off, with the Vulcan 
spacecraft. To provide some 
variation in gameplay. the siart 
screen offers players a choice of 
varied armament to build up m the 




Battling through tha kvbs tvroidzon* in Vulcan Ventura with Imaara and bomb* 
unleazhmft Sett, right and centra 



game: the Nemesis and 
Sa'smflncter armounes are ihere 
together with a new set containing 
torpedoes, rear-firing lasers, and 
other deal h- dispensing 

weaponry. 

Starting in space, aliens fly 
onscreen, leaving behind 
capsules when shot. Collect the 
capsules to select and build up the 
ship's arsenal. All fairly routine 
stuff dating back to Nemesis. The 
ship flies past suns as Salamander 
worms burst forth , turning circles 
around the player's ship and 
posing all sorts of problems This 
level is rather simple but employs 
movement vertically to increase 
the size of the playing area. 

Past suns and fire worms, alien 
attacks cease, then, with the 
machine shouting ' shoot it in the 
head!', the end-of-level Phoenix 
comes into view. Very pretty to 
look at as it naps up and down 
spitting fire and lasers, but that's 
about all. Slow its head off and it's 
onto Level 2 - graphics straight 
out of the nightmares of HR Giger. 
Aliens pounce at the ship, 
biomechanical growths have to be 
blasted away to progress and gun 
positions generally provide much 
hassle. 

Similar to the second stage in 
previous games, losing a life here 
(and all collected weapons) means 
you might as well say goodbye to 
getting any further (without 
resorting to the continue-play 
feature). This game shows no 
mercyj 



few of the deviously -designed 
hazards that are part and parcel of 
Konamfs Nemesis series 

Vulcan Venture is unoriginal in 
play, but like an old friend it's a 
more than welcome coin -op m th is 
age of beat-em-ups and never- 
ending race games. Packed with 
everything: great graphics, superb 
sound and second -to -none 
arcade action. Vulcan Venturer & 
worthy sequel despite the lack of 
any significant progress in 
gameplay, 

Tsito'a baat-'am-up may not took anything now but ifm fun and enjoyable to 
pimy 

I ' \v_ 



KAGEKI 

Taito 



L 



poking for novelty in the 
over-subscribed beat-'em- 
up genre, Kagekt is slightly 
different from the norm in 
using a higher viewpoint of 
the action, and it's set in an 
enclosed alleyway complete with 
other opponents watching 

You lake the good-guy role. 
Laying into rival gang members one 
at a time Two screens make up 
Ihe alleyway and fighters move 
around parrying blows, retreating 
when the going gets tough and 
delivering series of punches when 
the enemy is weakest. It you can 
get in a continuous volley of blows 
on your opponent as the bout 
begins, you stand a good chance 
of Dealing him On the other hand, 
if you gel stuck m a comer you can 
be literally pummelled MnssUii, 
which is a bit harsh in play 

The winner moves on to tackle 
the next, tougher opponent with 
the loser getting thrown down a 
bottomless pit. The graphics are 
amusingly done, Ihe characters 
have large heads and do some 
strange things while watching the 
action (one bystander lobs a 
morning star at the fighters if he 
gets bored.) 

A humorous coKi-op. devoid of 
anything new. but il has got some 
nice touches and that helps make 
ii worth a quick feed 

Thanks to Noel at the recently 
opened Oasis in Blackpool for 
the use of the machines. 










TGM TX 008:7-8818/124 



BWMB 



H M 



la 





Kevin Toms, inventor of the world's beet selling 
# ^ football game says, "tt beats my best setter 
— hands down" 

/♦% New improved features include:- Spectacular 
graphics and tactics with unlimited action, more 
fun and excitement. 




/,j The press says "it's fantastic - another mil 

The computer panel says "We were 
looking tor improvements on 
football Manager to be assured 
of a good game. We were 
surprised - it's outstanding! 
it's gold class!" JM 




CBMM/128Cufette 


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"Football Manager 2 

is not fust an 

improvement on 

Football Manager - 

it's the next 






KimHTOM 



Strrt'l D.ilc All lormjls Junr 17th 



'JUdlcttir* gu»»* ti ■ diruWa i 

PttUn Lclwr* Corporation pir 

Uoil I, Bilrd Roul. 
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Konamis arcade hit now 
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already a No. 1 hit. Seven 

Smelling events featuring 
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the instructor himself! Combat school throws down the challenge to the toughest of thoroughbred 
gamesters - but if you don't make the grade you're out* 

© 1987 Konami 



ruofft 

Special boxed pack containing FREE film post* 
and audio cassette of Smokey Robinson's "Trie If 
Capturing the intimidating mood of conflict mi |^ 
Platoon has been halted as "Best Film Tie-Jn to L- 



Hi 



feel the humidity, sense the threatening danger 
enounter the enemy and hrs many booby traps 
at your pen H Enemy soldiers lunge at you from 
can find vital information. Jf you come out of Ih 

© 1986 Hemdale FiJm Corporation, AH Rights Ri 



«fiY 




4TTi^WTT?i 



IG.1 



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A superb conversion for your home micro of 
Konami's arcade blockbuster, Featuring alf the 
game-pfay of the arcade original, Cryior takes 
yOu llWO a thrilling alien world of force fields, 
Fanatical guerillas and strange enemy defence 






nels, enter 
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tit this is the only 
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987 Kon 



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Got an ST??? Then, 
whatever you do, don't m 
out on the latest great relea 
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capabilities and superb animation on 
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COMPETITION 




Win your own Battlecar 
and games from HEWSON 



BE MEAN, BE TOUGH WIN A CAB! 



Play Saftfacer Marauder, the 
next hot bo* from Hewson, 
and feel the power of burning 
rubber on a fuiunstic road. This 
vertically scrolling shoot- em- 
up has you blasting invading forces 
from the earth and from the skies wit h 
laser cannon which seer through the 
battlefield. 

Don't think you've seen rl all before, 
Battlecar Marauder has that special 
sprinkle of Heweon magic: we're 
playing rt at the moment - though you 
are obliged to wart until the next issue 
for me full story - and the tgm learn 
is impressed Battlecar Marauder is 
written by Mark KeHy. author of many 
a Commodore demo, with graphics 
by Steve Crow complemented by the 
music of Barry Leitch end Dave 
Rodger? 



WeH, a little one anyway. Hewson is 
stumping one of the latest radio- 
controlled cars as top prize -run over 
the cat's tail, leave tyre marks in the 
hamster, drive granny up the wall as 
you do the same with your own 
battlecar . . . hours of fun for all the 
family. In addition to the radio- 
controlled hamster flatiener. the 
winner receives a copy of Battiacar 
Marauder on either the Commodore 
64/128. Spectrum or Amstrad CPC. 
Not skimping on the prizes Hewson 
are supplying 30 runners up with a 
copy of the game, again on any of the 
three formats. 

BATTUE BRAIN 

Hordes of marauding brain cells? 
Good, you need them to answer the 



WIN A RADIO- 
CONTROLLED 
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following incredibly difficult Questions 
if you want to be in with a chance of 
winning a battlecar . , , or the game 
Jot the answers.down on a postcard 
or back of a sealed Dunlop and send 

them to: MARAUDER COMP, THE 
GAMES MACHINE, PO Box 10. 

Ludlow, Shropshire SYS 1DB to 
arrive no later than July 21 . . and 
abide by the competition rules aa 
detailed in the masthead. 



1 : Which of these titles is not Hewson 
game? 
a) Pyracurse 
bJExOkm 
c) US Golds Greatest Hits 

2: What is the surname of the 
company's Managing Director? 

a) Hewson 

b) Cousins 
q) Barclay 

3: Which game has Mark Kelly written 
before? 

a) Captain Courageous 

b) Out Run 

cj Impossabali 



TGM TX 008:7-8823/124 






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EXPLOSIVE COIN-OP ACTION! 

Battle your way across the globe taking 
on the mighty fighting power of 10 
awesome exponents of hand to 
hand combat, 

"A SINCLAIR CLASSIC" 

"Thoroughly impressive combat 
game which knocks Renegade for 
€, Go damage someone." smciurVaer 

* ( It's fast, good looking and 
well hard" fw suietafr 



GIANTS OF THE VIDEO GAMES INDUSTRY 

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ksschlkksshk&rsssltsshck! 
Sound familiar? If you've ever been driven 
to distraction by an authentic g olden oldies 
buff swooning over her authentically 
scratched and shredded 78s. think on this: 
in ten years' time your flick ery, crashing old copy 
Of Out Run could be just as tedious and Knight 
Ore could seem as short as a side of shellac. 

It's all down to CD-ROM or, to make tt 
gobbJedygook, 'compact disk read-only 
memory' - essentially, plugging a compact disk 
(CO) player into your machine and loading 
software or reading data from a disk just like a 
musk CO. Just as that inscrutably shiny tittle 
platter has already put nuance-perfect Dire 
Straits into a million mindless households, so 
the massive and virtually incorruptible memory 
of the CD is set to transform computers - every 
kind, from mainframes to micros, roomfuls to 
laptops. 

For games-players this will eventually mean 
massive, detailed entertainment packages, with 
more levels and more intricacy than today's 
most sophisticated products; CD audio 
integrated with the game: and high-quality 
digitised photos (to illustrate adventures, 
perhaps.} 

Or at least the potential will be there. So far 
CD-ROM has only proved valuable for producing 
large, rarely -updated databases - in effect, as a 
replacement for books. It's no vague 
philosophising that prompted Microsoft Press 
to name its standard work CO- ROM: The New 
Papyrus, as the book goes on to point out that 
these resilient face-sized disks (they measure 
4.72" across} can each hold 250 'big books' - 
more precisely, over 650 million characters, 

And the first major CD-ROM publication, 
Gr&tter's Academic American Encyclopaedia. 
took up just a fifth of the disk space with its 9 
million words, 

But there's no reason why CD-ROM shouldn't 
carry software as well as reference data. Though 
mastering is expensive and it would take many 
person-months to program enough 
entertainment to hit a CD, reproducing CDs 
costs tittle more than copying floppy disks. 
Another attraction to software houses is that, 
because of the costs and the complex 
technology involved, casual CO-ROM piracy Is 
almost impossible. 

And CD-ROM readers are very simitar to the 
audio CD players you find in the high street 
(they're sometimes even called CD-ROM 
players): a single cheap machine reading both 
audio and CD-ROM data is seen as likely, ft will 
be just like a disk drive or tape recorder, but a lot 
faster - to compare it with one of today's slower 
hint*. CD-ROM will fit I Spectrum I 3 RAM in just 
under a second. 

But because of the development costs, CD* 
ROM will remain, the preserve of big-budget 
houses; and only games with long 
periods of real recorded sound and complex 
graphics, perhaps digitised from real images, 
will be worth doing in the new technology, 

A CD-ROM disk's 682 Mbyte memory capacity 
means it could store well over 5,000 of today's 
Spectrum games - and though programmers 
always want more memory than they're offered, 
nobody Is likely to write games that long just yet, 
not even for Code Masters Plus. Even if they 
could, you'd end up with a 5.000- part 
muttitoad . . . 

International electronics giants Philips and 
Sorry, which started seriously developing CD- 
ROM in 1983 and published details of a standard 
physical format in 1985, envisaged it as a 
separate hardware. But then they, who had 
announced the standard for CD audio in 1980, 
had a vested interest in charging C200 twice for 
two different boxes. 

Philips had already released a CD-ROM-only 
reader, the CM 100, for IBM PC compatibles. 
Within a year most major computer companies 
had taken an interest, ensuring that CD-ROM will 
not wilt as an overprotected flower of Philips/ 



26/124TGM TX 008:7-88 



The next step came in 1988, when 13 major 
firms including Microsoft (which produces the 
ail-pervading MS-DOS operating system for IBM 
PCs), Apple and Hitachi agreed On a logical fits 
format for CD-ROM - meaning that CD-ROM 
data can be read in any operating system. 

One of these so-called High Sierra Group 
companies — American minicomputer 
manufacturer Digital Equipment Corporation - 
has recently put all its software on CD-ROM. 
Micro software firms like Electronic Arts are 
watching closely! too - interest is keen 
throughout the US, where CD-ROM players cost 
little more than their audio equivalents and then 
Is even a CD-ROM magazine. 

When audio CO appeared, everyone but the 
techies and the airheadedly aspiralion.il 
t rea t e d it at a gadget. Now the music in- . 
dustry expects audio CD to take ov?i Jm 
from records (black discs') for all but jm 
a few specialised titles, as soon as the /^r 
present generation of turntables has f 
died and everyone buys CD play- ^r 
era as replacements instead of J 
new turntables, ft is expected J 
that by 1990 all households M 
with audio equipment wilt ^f 
have a CD player. 

CD-ROM appeared sudd- 
enly, out of the blue to the 
great computer- using 

public, making all those 
science fiction at mo- i 
spherics about huge lib- 1 
raries and databases on 
a single screen, a sin- 
gle key away, seem 
suddenly plausible. 

In 1980, Dire Straits j 
CDs were the stuff of 
fantasy; by 1986 Com- _ 
ftuier News was des- 
cribing the stars of the 
CD-ROM show as 
'small, silver and about 
to take over the world'. 

It happened so sudd- 
enly because there was 
no groundwork to be 
done - all that had hap- 
pened in the service of the 
audio god, ever higher, 
fidelity. 

In audio, CD was the rev* 
otution that happened. In 
computing, CD-ROM is the 
revolution that is about to. 

3-MILE ROUNDABOUT 

It may look like a Frisbee of precious 
metals, and you can probably throw It 
around the park without doing much 
harm - as one American writer observed, 
But the secret Ol th* glittering CD-ROM disk 
is the 3-mile-iong track of pits and plateaus (or 
lands) running on one side, from the centre out. 
These pits and lands encode the data, Mel 
C roue her covered CD mechanics in TOM001 , but 
to recap - and add some more interesting fact* 
- here's how it works: 

The disk is read by a laser and a photo 
detector. The laser is focused on the track, and 
reflected by ptts and lands at different angle*. 
The photo detector senses these angles, and 
turns the sequence of pits and lands into binary 
data which a computer can use. 

A CD-ROM disk can store up to 682 Mbytes 
(698,368K!| of data. But because the outer 5mm 
of the disk can be flawed and gets dirty easily, it 



It may not be the fastest 
a second to fill a Spectniii 
biggest portable means of 
reusable disks soon avail. 




THE WORM TURNS 



is usually left blank {as you can see from the 

■m dium - it would take almost ^^^SSSt^ ** *"*** ""* *" 

||f| 3 RAM - Dlft CD-ROM fS the Data is read from the disk at 153.BK/second. 



lab'fti Bamaby Page looks at the 
plications 




"The 

CD-ROM 

publication, 

Groller's Academic 

American Encyclopaedia, 

took up just a fifth of the 

disk space with its 

9 million words. 



mora than half a second, making CD-ROM 
slower than most PC hard disks, say - though 
still speedier than floppies and gloriously faster 
than tape. 

A logical fife format standard set by the High 
Sierra Group In 1986 means all CD-ROMs are 
data-compatible - that is, they can all be read by 
any CD-ROM player. Software and operating 
systems stored on CD-ROM will, of course, still 
have to be machine- specific - a different version 
is required to suit the internal structure of each 
different machine. 

APPLICATIONS 

There is no entertainment software on 
CD-ROM yet, and because no soft- 
ware house could begin to fill the 
disk with games it seems likely 
\\ that CD-ROM's major entertain- 
ment function will be comb- 
ining recorded music or dig- 
itised images and games. 
A music CD can store 74 
minutes of high-quality 
audio, so when a single 
CD-ROM/audio CD player 
is available game sound- 
tracks will be revolut- 
ionised. Similarly, very 
* detailed digitised pic- 
l lures te n bo stored - 
lifelike enough to ghm 
the next generation of 
high-resolution mon- 
itors something to 
grapple with. 

Realistically comp- 
uter game graphics 
and cartoons will also 
be possible, but CD- 
ROM is loo slow to play 
back Irve-action video - 
I it can deliver only 2 or 3 
frames a second, where- 
as 30 are needed to avoid 
jerfciness. 
CD-ROM belongs to the 
same family as the magnetic 
disk and tape - it's just a 
wealthy, generous but rather 
/ unfamiliar relative from a 
distant branch, offering lots more 
memory in a small, safe space. In- 
formation can be stored virtually 
error-tree - with error-correction 
codes m the data, mistakes can be 
reduced to i misread bit per quadrillion - 
and the disks cannot be erased. All this 
makes CO-ROM suitable for very targe text- 
dominated databases; already they are being 
published, much like books. The CD-ROM disk 
In our Illustration shows a sample from Nimbus's 
World Health Knowledge Base, a medical 
"knowledge base' like an encyclopaedia but 
using all the facilities of the computer to 
for particular words and help doctors In t 
nosis. 

It requires WOK of RAM , which shows why val- 
uable CD-ROM won't appear in entertainment 
yet - the storage technology is useless without 
micros that can harness ft. 



A C D - ROM d isk is more like a book than a floppy: 
it's unerasable, and you can't write on it. But 
both problems could be solved by the next 
generation of erasable CD-ROM and optical 
disks, such as Tandy'* forthcoming Th©r-CD. 

Though Tandy is keeping mum about Its 
product, observers believe it will use a low* 
power laser to even out the disk's pattern of pits 



then start over again with a high-powered laser 
to record new data. 

But it's not known how many erasings and 
rerecordings the disk will stand before It's 
literally worn away, so It won't be much good for 
high -score tables. 

But there's a closer solution which couM 
harness the massive memory of optical storage, 
and turn these disks from books into notepads. 

CD-ROM is closely related to the WORM* - 
optical disks which use a similar method of 
reading unerasable data which is stored as a 
bumpy surface. The difference is mat WORM 
(write once, read many times) disks can be 
initially written on by the disk drive, whereas CO- 
ROM disks must be manufactured. So a WORM 
disk is like an ordinary magnetic floppy that, 
once written to, is set permanently to write- 
protect. 

Now {you guessed It) reusable optical disks 
have crept out of the WORMhold Sony expected 
to ship the first £3,800 drives (which reed end 
write) and C1 10 disks in May. 

The new machines don't actually write on the 
disk over and over again with a laser - rather, 
they record data as magnetic fields, Closely 
targeted on the disk by a laser, 

And then they read the disk with a laser beam 
which is reflected in different ways by different 
magnetic charges, just as the pits and tands of a 
CD-ROM disk deflect light differently. 

Sony's price tags aren't much higher than the 
cost of single-use WORM systems, and Sony 
promises they'll come down when production is 
in full swing - and, no doubt, when rival Sharp 
Electronics releases its competing product So 
we can expect these reusable optical disks to 
steal the thunder from Thor-CD, 



Tiw businawi aid* ot m CO- ROM dish f — n 
harm in thm contra momm 58%, bigger than 
iifmsiza). The mncodad data only occupies 
approximately 25"v ot tha total araa from tha 
centre out. Batow: she w* the ravarmm «kta; this 
disk contain* tha AIDS Expert/Information 
System tram Ihtf World Health Knowtedgm 
0v»sp, nnd is In t m nd m d mm m sample to mhaw 
doctors how usmtul m CD-ROM modioli 
0-ncycloaaadta fa 



TGM IX 008:7-8827/124 



PC ENGINE 



THE 



MIDGET MONSTER 

We have several times mentioned the PC Engine in THE GAMES MACHINE and, understand- 
ably, reader curiosity regarding this mystery-shrouded Japanese wonder-beast has 
peaked. Contrary to the impression given by a journalist recently in a certain other well- 
known multiuser magazine of some venerabi liry , very little is known about the machine 
yet, What we do know Is that its manufacturers, Japanese NEC, have allowed very few 
UK software houses to have the machine for assessment, and have made them sign non- 
disclosure agreements. You can't buy a PC Engine in Britain yet, but THE GAMES MACHINE 
can reveal that you will be able to very soon - and tell you where. Will you want to? Read 
on . . . 



Rare Ltd took delivery of a PC Engine back in December (see 
the mammoth feature in TGM004) - probably the first in Britain. 
Since then their hardware and software engineers have had six 
months to play around with it, so it was to Rare that we went to 
find out more. 



And actually . there ten'! much to 
find out. To every serious tech- 
nical question. Rare' 5 Chns 
Stamper shook his head and 
evoked the non-disclosure 
agreement- What fellows is only the 
non-secret Information - hardly the 
stuff ot exerting investigative jour- 
nalism! But really it is the games this 
monstrous midget plays that are 
import ant. 

But before the games, in brief: 
The PC Engine is amazingly small - 
though somewhat bigger than stated 
by the above-mentioned journalist 
who must have had a cut-down ver- 
sion at 4 '" square - it actually meas- 
ures 5%"" square by 1 V6" deep, and 
weighs virtually nothing, fts rounded 
comers make it slightly resemble the 
Commodore C2N datacassette. The 
deep-cut slot accepts a ROM-card. 
there's an on/off switch and one joys- 
tick port, making this a one-player 
machine. There is a massive row port , 
however, through which it is likely two 
PC Engines can be connected for 
two-player games, though at present 
there « no two-player software. The 
joystick is similar to the control cards 
of other consoJes, but the PC Engine 
has a marvelous pause facility, con- 
trofled by a button on the joycard. 

Sound is of arcade quality through 
six channels. Measurable pixel 
resolution is 330x^5$, allowing for 
32 background colours and 32 sprite 
colours at once out ot a very large 
palette (estimated at up to 512 
colours). The ROM-card capacity is 
something NEC aren't talking about 
but. judging by the games, rts big 'The 
processor is also a secret; that well- 
known journalist (againf) confidently 
states it is 16-bit - so does ACE 
magazine, but Shmtaro Kanaoya 
(Readerpage TGM005) says 
otherwise: 8-brt. a fact he offers from 
Japanese magazine adverts, 
arthough the phrase used is '8- bit 
custom chip ... how much do you 



have to customise an 8-bit chip to 
make it 16-bit7; Hare, who know, 
refuse to dtsdose, but they, like 
Shintaro, add that on-screen it 
certainly looks like a 16-bit . , . 

The credit card-sized games meas- 
ure 85mm x 55mm x 4mm (metne's 
easier for this one!). As Rare's Tim 
Stamper says, you can put a PC 
Engine in your bag/school satchel 
whatever and stuff loads of games m 
your pocket and cart the whole enter- 
tainment system around with you 
from telly to telly. It's just what the 
games industry needs, he thinks. His 
brother Chns is more cautious; 'The 
Nintendo is still for us.' he says, his 
support for the machine backed by 
Rare's current success m the Amer- 
ican Nintendo charts (see the News 
pages and watch out for our 16-brt 
Nintendo coverage in TGM008 ) 

There is little doubt that the PC 
Engine is the nearest thing to an 
arcade machine in the quality of 
graphic presentation that you could 
get for the home, although at present 
the software support is light, Hudson- 
Soft are the major software company 
behind the games already released in 
Japan, but Namco are faking an 
interest (there's one of their games 
previewed here.) Word has it that R- 
Type is the game that will make the 
PC Engine, and in our judgment it 
should be no problem . Just take a look 
at the screen shots and drool! 

Speaking for Ocean, one of the very 
few other British companies to have 
an assessment PC Engine, Software 
Manager Gary Bracey said of it: It's 
nice, tt's important for us to keep 
abreast of new developments.' But 
when asked whether Ocean would be 
producing any games for the 
machine, Gary helpfully replied: 'No 
comment . „ „ and then added some- 
thing unprintable! 

GOi's Product Manager. David 
Baxter was a touch more forthcoming: 
Brilliant, fantastic - it has so much 



potential within the Japanese price 
point, It's obviously going to be some 
lime before the PC Engine hits the UK 
with any force. In Japan demand is 
outstripping supply: the next market 
they are heading for is the US.' And 
are they GOling for it? ' If the machine 
lakes off we will produce games for it 
- naturally. ' he replied. 

UK prices are not firmed up yet, and 
to predict would be foolish - it costs 
around E1 00 in Japan. The games are 
expensive by UK standards, though 
cheaper than Nintendo. But if you 
want to give it a whirl, the place to 
keep your eye on is In Stock Com- 
puters, Effort Street, Ashby dm la 
Zouch, Leicestershire LE6 5JU 
They assure THE GAMES MACHINE 
that they will be first with this amazing 
arcade-quality home console and it 
will be available shortly. 




THE GAMES 

Out of some 11 PC Engine games 
which have drifted into Britain. THE 
GAMES MACHINE got to grips with 
the six best to give some indication of 
what to expect We'll let the pictures 
do most of the talking: but be assured, 
the sound quality is second-to-none. 
The six we looked at - Japanese/ 
English translations permitting - are: 
Shanghai, Wonder Soy, Drunken 
Master. Victory Run, R- Type and Tate 
Of The Monster Path. 



Tha cfdrt-cjrd 
-sizmd ROM* 

that maka tt 

wMhtppen 



Za'WTGM TX 008:7-88 



FEATURE 




With thanks to Rare Umiled. Shintaro 
Kanoya for the translations (including 
the fascinating but irrelevant 
information that 'takovsht ' & 
Japanese for 'octopus cow') and 
Mark Bettandge (who played the 
games to perfection, except Taie Of 
The Monster Path, brilliantly done by 
Chris Stamper.) 



SHANGHAI HudSt*vSofl 
Is a puzzle game using Mah-jong 
character blocks These are arranged 
fa varied numbers of several layers in 
a roughly pyramid -shape. The Objecl 
b to point at a character block on the 
exterior of the top layer and match il 
to another of the same character on 
any of the lower layers. It this is 
accomplished the selected Wock van- 
ishes - end so the game proceeds, 
the final object being to eliminate as 
many blocks as you can. As you can 
see from the screen shot, the blocks 
are beautrhjity detailed end rendered 
In shaded, isometnc 3-D. A compel- 
kng and lengthy game. 



tn MfOfKler Boy thm blggmr rtssty sprftm* ar* malty antrriaimd Am hm vnt*h**ki 
m ptift ot wmokm, thm mxprmmmion on thm *<tH gmnim'a fmcm mdda dmilffttt to thm 

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onthttopttourmiisyri 



WONDER BOY Hudson -Soft 
We decided this one was aimed more 
■t the younger player, which isn't to 
say it's easy, and there are hours or 
play involved to complete It. Wonder 
Boy moves through many; often scrol- 
ling, land and townscapes. attacking 
monsters and other hazards. As he 
despatches his opponents, they turn 
into money or other useful itemg 
which aid him in the adventure. With 
the money, he can visit shops and pur- 
chase other essential goods. The 
larger sprite monsters are delightfully 
designed and full of animated detail. 



m\. m - 




» gmmmt rmttah cut* charmc- Thtt ta thm gmmm fft* PC Engine 

tmrf-mndthrnvmndorrlnWof^mrBoy wmttmdfor-R-Typm.Tumthmpmgmta 

mrm dmckfmdty cutm . , , *## thm mctiort! 

WSkW 




TGM TX 008:7-8829/124 



DRUNKEN MASTER Hudson-Sort 
A martial arts game which shows what 
the PC Engine can do. The sprites are 
more (Kan barf the screen's height 
with all major details tuny animated. 
Figure movement is extraordinarily 
realistic, set against several different 
backdrops (including nighttime ver- 
sions) with between- screen bonus 
games- The odd title derives from the 
fact thai later opponents keep swig- 
ging from bottles - the more they drink 
the harrier they are to despatch 
because they get so drunk they don't 
even know they've been hrtl 

In Drunken Master the mam wMnito* arm rushing grey monks who bowl over 
mm Hero unteam he rapidly knocks mem out of me way 




let you pray to a buddah which may 
increase your spiritual health, still 
others turn out to be shops selling 
food, weapons and other items lost in 
the Japanese text' One, some 15 
minutes into ihe game, snows a 
geisha girl performing a striptease. 




TALE OF THE MONSTER PATH 

Namco 

la an Immensely detailed, scrolling 
arcade-adventure - a quest for 
something . . . well; Japanese. The 
running, jumping and swimming hero 
is equipped with a sword to rid himself 
of many enemies as he moves swiftly' 
through ever-changing landscapes 
The massive alien spaceship with its 
disintegrating modules - and 
more - . - The title is translated from 
the Japanese by Shmiaro Kanoya 
(Rare didn't know what it meant), so it 
is approximate 1 

The top-right comer has a window, 
which is a marvellous variation on the 
old Defender radar scanner - a com- 
plete isometric 3-D world showing the 
hero's immediate surroundings. Kill- 
ing certain monsters accesses sub- 
game screens; m some you can gam- 
ble on dice throws to increase your 
wealth (which buys you much}, others 

7ft* hmro swipes m nmafy in Tata Of The M onal«r Path against denmty detailed, 
scrolling backdrops. Top- right is the animated 3- D 'kmnmt ' showing currant 
location in mm Immediate locals 







StmodingoYtfhaiflhmmermmn'mhm^ht.Omaprn^sin DmnWen Master ar*r»pftiy 
detailed and tufty, smoothly animated- The hmro takes en a tamato opponent 





One of the Monster Path sud games- Ihm getshagtrt « about to strip- a teas* 
almost cuatom-dem ij g n md to mhowthm PC ' Engmm's mar v s M o w pmvmm tmJ B tyl 



RTYPE Hudson-Soft 
This is the game tipped to put the PC 
Engine m the big-time. Ft you have 
seen or played the Irem arcade 
machine you will be able to judge for 
yourself how accurate this version is 
from the screen shots. Suffice to say 
it has everything. The scrolling, explo- 
sions, single sprues and conglomer- 
ate sprites ere astonishing. It seems 
unbelievable that this can all be 
packed into one tiny ROM-card, and 
R- Type shows - better than anything 
- the PC Engine's hardware capabil- 
ity. 

The exerting Irem arced* machine in 
a pockst -sued console! Everything 
In n-Tvpa '* her*' Muftip** weapons 




collection at you progr »ss the eerily 
organic backdrops, beautifully ani- 
mated missiles, the repulsively put 



•fating heart and the snake writhing 
through Us venfneuiar chamber*, the 
brmawrtty dmaigned Hft Qiger-style 



•JUimna 'monster - and. of erwrsm, the 
mmaatve alien spaceship with Aedto* 
integrating modules - end more -. . * 




30 124TGM TX 008:7-88 



FEATURE 



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VK1 OR* RUN Hudson-Soft 
Aft Vie sheer quality and ferocity of 
Drunken Master revstaJises the beat- 
"•ro-up game, so Victory Run adds a 
n«w dimension to the road racer. This 
$ one of the best! It uses hidden hori- 
zons and even double- hidden hori- 
zons to add reality to the effect and 
Mmtbmes creates severe cornering 
problems. Taking hills too fast can 
hive you leaping off the road The 3-D 
animation effect on bikers, other cars 
and vast juggernauts is completely 
oaivincing without the accustomed 
frame jumps of other home micro 
near games. Careless driving can 
cost you gear teeth too - trying to 
engage a damaged gear results in a 
fnghteningly accurate engine tearing 
tound from the speakers! 

AK 

pwnf flup 
torn* 



TWO MOMeuBvf shots onfym 

—c o n d mp*rt ur Victory Run 

which gtvii some idea of thr 

uttra smooth 3-D jmmabon 

on 0*9 hilts ml*9ct wnd the sprites 



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terran 



EUROPE'S LEADING 

COMPUTER REPAIR CENTRE 



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OFF 

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f^02 fc , ft B* 



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£19.95 



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and well quote immediately inclusive of first 
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HOW TO CONTACT US 
• For quotes on computers not listed or an 
any component, telephone Q?7Q 44264, 
j Quoting GAM/0741. 

*To send us your micro tor repair, mail it 

securely [];irkf*ri accompanied h y >. hequfc 

postal order (made out to Verran Micro 
Maintenance Limited] or quale your Access 
or ftarclaycerd number And Id obtain your 
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COMPETITION 




And lighten it up with a home laser show and 
loads of DARK SIDE goodies from INCENTIVE 



I'LL NAME THAT ZEPHYR IN 



IF YOU'VE GOT THE 
MCEHTTVE , . . 

ike a trip into the amazing three- 
amenstonal world of the Dark Side 
from the power of Incentive's 
Fnmcepe graphics routine. Dark 
Sfcf»i$ the superb sequel 10 last year's 
smash hit Oniier fTGMOOfc 96%) and 
Mto of sn advert) ure 200 years later as 
the Ketars, a banished group of the 
futuristic human race, are planning 
fetnbolion Thar revenge takes the 
form of Zephyr One (Currently being 
used as incentives office), a giant 
laser generator designed to destroy 
Evatri The Suspense ;s killing 
read the review on page 74 to find nut 
more about the game. 

SUPE R CHARGE THOSE 
LASERS! 

Beam your braincefls into life and be 



in with a chance of winning a 
captivating home laser show from 
Incentive Though not quite powerful 
enough to wipe out Evalh, this prize. 
when used Ifl conjunction with your 
stereo, generates laser beams to 
shoot around the room, bouncing off 
cetlmgs and walls - it works rather well 
at parties (Hey man, like . , wOV/), 

The laser show is lop pnze . . . Ten 
second pnze-winnefs get Freescape 
free-standing pens; stand a pen, ball- 
point down, vertically on the base of 
the holder, and it stays there 
supported by a magnetic field - it also 
works weil at parties (Hey man, like 
that's reasonably Interesting.) 25 
runners up each get a Dark Skim A2 
poster with artwork by Stemar Lund 
and a key ring each, which may not 
make you the life and soul of a party 
unless you attach the keys of a Rolls 
Royce to the ring. 



A FABULOUS 
HOME LASER 
LIGHT SHOW, 

SELF- 
SUPPORTING 
PENS, DARK 
SIDE POSTERS 
AND KEY- 
RINGS! 



, . . and rl you can. a home laser show 
could be yours as long as you can 
name some of the objects pictured 
here, taken from Oar* Side Simply 
decide which of the sue objects 
(lettered A - F) are: 

1: Energy Collecting Device* 

2 Zephyr One 

3: Tele pod 

4: Telepod Crystal 

Dues can be found m the Dark Skim 
review. Having sorted out which is 
what, write the answers on a postcard 
or back of a sealed orbiting space 
cruisef and send rt to: WHO'S 
AFRAID Of THE DARK? COMP. 
THE GAMES MACHINE. PO Box TO, 
Ludiaw, Shropshire SYS 1DB to 
arrive no later than July 2 T All entrants 
must abide by the competition rules, 
as detailed in the masthead, ureses 
they, Uke the Ketars, want to be 
banished to some desolate, 
despairing place like Basingstoke. 





TGM TX 008:7-8833^124 



When ihe brothers Kashio 
developed a synthesizer they 
m fact researched, developed 
and designed a beauty of an 
instrument It is capable of 
nice fat synth sounds and also is not 
loo bM at impersonating 
instruments However, somewhere 
between the design stage and the 
marketing men there was obviously a 
great discrepancy 

How do I know that 9 Because Casio 
put out the CZ series with the most 
dog-awful set of voices imaginable, 
Skimped on the internal memory and 
made it nearly as hard to program as 
the nval Yamaha DX series. They 
improved matters slightly with the 
later versions, but the most popular 
(and of course the cheapest) CZ1Q1 
and 1000 are swine to program. Intact 
most of the voices that you see (and 
buy) use only a small part of its full 
potential. 

The specfication has an eight si age 
envelope; that is to say a sound. 
timbre and prtchshaper that can go 
through eight rises-and-falla before 
the sound has finished. Most voices 
only use two or three. Additionally, 
this can be doubted up on the twin 
lines that the oscillators can follow. To 
throw several socket sets into the 
works, the sound generation is 
provided by combining two 
waveforms. And I haven't mentioned 
the other controls like noise and ring 
modulation. Adding insult to injury: 
the LCD is not backlit. is obviously 
made for myopic fleas, and you can't 
name your sound: Casio managed to 
name their own useless 16 sounds, 
but your 16 sounds will always be 
called Internal 1,2. 3, etc. {Yamaha 
must have rubbed their yen-laden 
hands with glee when they launched 
the rival DX10O with 192 voices on 
board, all named and with cassette 
storage facilities), 

COULD BE A WINNER 

But put it all on screen . make it so thai 
you can tug the graphs around with 
the mouse, add a voice librarian and 
you have a winner, 

From American software house 
Hybrid Arts comes the CZ-Andr&d- 
It's made to work with all of the CZ 
series of syrrths including the 
C2230S, which la in fact a single 
keyboard with drums and all. Actually 
the only way to program the latter is 
with such a program. 

Boot up and you get three columns 
ail marked initialize'. That's because 
there is nothing Ln them!. From the file 
menu, load either one or two of the 
three voice libraries that you get with 
the program - this loads into the two 
outer cofumns. The centre column 
refers to the synthesizer memory area 

You can transfer the voices 
individually or en masse by dragging 
them with the mouse. To edit a voce, 
or create a new one, drag it into the 
area marked workspace' - actually 
the edit buffer - click on edit and the 
screen slips to the edit with its two 
horizontal rows of numbers. You can 
increment or decrement these at will 
by moving the arrow to the selected 
area. I found this to be pretty efficient 
if you want to copy the voice from a 
voicing chart, (tf you didn't know, you 
can buy voicing charts and books Tor 
individual synthesizers.) However, the 




Ever In search of the easy life, Jon Bates has 
been programming sounds with apparent ease 
using a couple of amazing voice programmers 
and would urge you to do the seme, He's also 
got his hands on a brand new scoring package 
which could put you In business as a music 
publisher 

What do you do when your newly acquired synthesizer turns out 
to be a crash course in patience when it comes to sound 
creation? Do you; a) use rt to paddle a canoe? b) condemn it to 
the top of the wardrobe? c) get hold of a voice programmer? 
Don't turn to Mel's Trivia Quiz at the back, because the answer's 
right here: if you have a DX7 or Casio CZ series synth read on. 



11 CZ- Android's 

empirical 

approach quite 

often throws 

up some really 

Interesting 

sounds * . . " 



real last voice programming comes 
with the little picture of e black, 
postman- type envelope in the corners 
of the main editing areas «■ those for 
pitch, filtering and amplification. Click 
on this and you get the envelope 
proper ('envetope'' envelope -play on 
meanings. Yeah? Never Mind.) 

Each envelope has the individual 
stages marked by a minute square. 
Click on the square and can drag the 
envelope around Into all sorts of 
shapes very quickly indeed- ft is only 
then that you fully appreciate just what 
a hopeless and chancy game it is 
programming it from the miserly 
display on the synth. As you reshape 
the envelope, so parts of it that you 
set up previously change in value- 



Without this sort of visual display I can 
only liken rt playing Carrier Gorrmartd 
on a wristwalch TV. 



THE CUNNING 

ANDROID 

Bored, Fed up? Can't program the 
sound you warn? Stuck for 
inspiration? Easy. Go for the Android 
item on the menu. This cunning little 
routine does lots of fancy maths 
behind the screen and comes up with 
a sort of sound that you might like to 
tweak up. You can repeal Ihis ad 
infinitum uniH you come up with 
something that grabs your ear This 
empirical approach quite often throws 



34/124TGM TX 008:7-88 






MUSIC 




up some really interesting sounds, 
ones that you wouldn't probably find 
if you just tried for one particular 
sound. H the sound is a brt thin you 
have* Distort option which beefs it up 
• rttto Try hitting this several times for 
fun. The tower part of the edit screen 
i$ for the fine and coarse detuning, 
octave setting, and waveform 
selector) and all the other sound 
peripherals. 

M voices created can be named 
and fled on the horary page. Shuffling 
voices within libraries is just a matter 
of dragging sounds around. II you 
have one of the touch sensrtive 
Cas>os, the program can cope with 
these as well My only niggle is that for 
each edit you have to reach over and 
clay the synth - many other voice 
programs have an autopJay feature 
which can be user-defined, This 
would have capped what is otherwise 
a simple and very effective program. 

You can got it for the Alan ST for the 
price of £89.95, In effect the CZ- 
Androai ts a spin-off from the original 
DX-Drad program. Indeed it is 
programmed by the same person, one 
Tom Bojares Owners of 'the world's 
most popular synthesizer' with sales 
topping the hall a million mart* can 
now pay full attention. 



A STAGGERING ARRAY 

To be fair, the world marketplace is 
flooded with 0X7 programs which 



isn't surprising. You'd be a bit silly to 
try and establish a good market profile 
wrth a program that voiced something 
obscure, Oddty enough, I found the 
DX-Dratd not such a bundle of joy to 
work wrth. It is very, very 
comprehensive, but having become 
used to the idea that I can reshape 
envelopes etc, with the mouse, the 
concept of hrtting numbers situated 
under a display that then alters the 
graph is a bit pedestrian. It's a bit 
confusing at first in its definition of 
banks', files', catalogues'. 

However it does have a staggering 
array of features. It can handle, at any 
one time. 18 banks of 32 sounds each 
plus 1 032 extra individual presets that 
do not necessarily have to be the 
same as the banks of sounds. It would 
seem that all sounds contain extra 
details known as 'function 
parameters': that is: the details of the 
modulation and pitch wheel and foot 
pedals as opposed to fust the "edit 
parameters' which are the hundreds 
of numbers that control the creation 
of the basic sound. When you are 
sending voices/banks 1o the DX you 
can chose whether to send all 
parameters or function or edit 
parameters It has one or two 
idiosyncrasies: it won't carry on 
unless you load a file disk into it which 
is a bit strange. But not to worry. 

EFFICIENT LIBRARIAN 

On the first screen proper you get a 



It 



. prog- 
ramming a DX7 
is about as 
much fun as 
shooting your- 
self In the 
foot.' 1 



host of features. The screen, which 
always has an ominous black 
background, uses the top area as 
main command and is run from the 
function keys - there are no drop- 
down menus which is surprising. 
Underneath this is a copious list of 
subfunclions lor each area of work. 
which works from the mouse. The 
screen bottom is reserved for 
inputting commands m response to 
the prompts. 

As a librarian it is extra efficient. You 
can store lots of sounds, organise 
them and access them easily. For 
rapid access, each file of sounds can 
be given a 1 26-char acter index card. 
All lists of files and indexes can be 
printed out. The accessibility is on 
many levels - index numbers (huhf), 
file name or even part of a file name so 
that it gathers all files with, say, 'string' 
as part of the name. Files can be 
locked or unlocked, which is a failsafe 
device to prevent you overwriting your 
favourite sounds Sounds are shuffled 
between locations wrthin banks with 
ease, as they are between the synth 
and the program, it just takes a bit of 
understanding of the program's 
hierarchy to follow what is going on. 
however there is bags of help 
available at all times, which is a Good 
Thing. 

Voice creation is fairly painless, 
increment and decrement ail the 
numbers. You can do this either on 
the global page that lists ail the 
numbers (numerical edit) or flip to the 



TGM TX 008:7-8836/124 



MUSIC 






DX-Droid 



$ Hybrid 




// /// // /// //in \\ \\\ v\ \\\ \\ \\\ 



y 



individual graph pages. I think I would 
prefer a higher resolution screen that 
has all the graphs on display and that 
you can drag around. Any edited 
parameters are marked with an 
asterisk and there is always the 
original version to compare it with 
both visually, numencaJly and aurally 
Any edit you make is automatically 
sounded on the Synth or triggered 
from the F9 key. 

DON'T SHOOT THE 
PIANIST'S FOOT 

However it comes into its own when 
it's in the business of creating voices. 
Like the Casio version, there is a OroJd 
feature which generates basic sounds 
for you to tweak. But there are two 
options: "Droid 1 " is the sane, musical 
version, Droid 2" is the more wacky 
sounds. You can do this to individual 
voices or a whole bank at a time. You 
can go over the top and create an 
entire fleet of random voices; 10 x 32 
voices 1 Perhaps its best feature is the 
combination of two voices to produce 
a third composite voice. This is 
something quite unique. You can 
'glide" between the sounds and the 
program lets you determine just how 
much of each sound you want. 

1f all this isn't enough, you can beef 
up the sounds by hitting a distort key. 
Altogether it is a very feature-packed 
program but not one to be taken tightly 
in a few minutes. I tried it on both the 
Mkl arid Mk2 versions of the DX7 and 
it worked with no problems on either, 
it will also work with any of the DX7 
tone modules. As programming a DX7 
is about as much fun as shooting 
yourself in the foot, any program 
which uses the computer to creatively 
set up sounds is a bonus. However, I 
do like dragging graphs around with 
my mouse . . . The cost of this 
creative lot is a weighty £179.95. 

Both these programs have been 
available in the States and to the 
cognoscenti for some time time now, 
DX-Oroid first appearing in about 
August 1 996 and the CZ- Android a 
few months later. They still have 
considerable advantages over other 
voicing software, and certainly the 
random and yet sensible voice 



creation is a wonderful bonus that is 
only |ust being npped-orf by newer 
programs. The DX-Drotd is not 
something thai you can get into in a 
matter of a few minutes, in fact t found 
that rt took quite some time to adjust, 
whereas the Casio equivalent was 
pretty self evident - m other words you 
can almost throw the manual away, 
The screen display for the CZ-Androfa 
has been copied many times by other 
Synth voicing programs. Anyway it 
can't be all that bad as a certain 
prominent Newsfieid personage not a 
million miles away from THE GAMES 
MACHINE omce/structure/chaos 
area is a happy man since he got one. 

BOOSE Y & HAWKES 
ETAL 

On to the business end. that is the 
"score- it- yourself desk top music 
publishing package also from Hybrid 
Arts. We previewed the demo version 
of this back in TGM003 and finally the 
finished version arrived, complete 
with voluminous and super - 
comprehensive manual, It is almost 
easier to list what it doesn't do! 

EZ- Score Plus exports its files 
happily into the graphics package 
Gagas £/rfe fTG M0Q2) and rumour has 
■t that you can whizz the same files 
mto a publishing package so that the 
whole score can be produced in book 
or magazine form, while it also imports 
files from any of the Hybrid Arts 
sequencing packages - in effect you 
can create a masterpiece, read it into 
EZ-ScQfW Pius and print it up. 

It supports most pnnters and the 



Tfja OX Ortrnl utility from 
Hybrid Aria inc. 



"DX-Droid's 
best feature is 
the combina- 
tion of two 
voices to pro- 
duce a third 
composite 
voice." 



"It is almost 

easier to list 

what EZ-Score 

Plus doesn't 

do! 1 ' 

The EZio road score shtmts 




36 124TGM TX 008:7-88 






: . \ i§ l 4 ,' lit. » 

• — i~ i * » * — ^~~f 



r 



I I 



• I I J > 

i — ' ill I 




• — 



printing resolution is superb. For ihe 
real I rung a la sec printer is a must; mind 
you. at thai you are getting very 
serious indeed. It will doubtless find 
lots of uses m educational 
establishments since exams now use 
compositions with scored out pads - 
there is nothing like the hardcopy m 
front of you for (me -tuning the details 

The program boasts over 140 
musical notes, rests, dynamic 
markings, and includes slurs, ties and 
phrasing. Key and clef are no problem 
and it automatically puts beams on 
individual quavers to tidy them up. It 
supports chords symbols and even 
guitar tabulaiure The score can be 
expanded and compressed for fine- 
detail editing. Tempo marks, 
rehearsal marks, repeats, cut and 
paste copy are just some of the things 
it can do, In short, it is a professional 
package. 

NOTHING FOR VIOLA 

You can put lyrics in and even design 
a litis page and lay out your score. The 
program can run in a variety of ways 
and I found for me rt could be worked 
faster by a combination of mouse and 
ST keyboard. Although it has a very 
well-thought-out idea for inputting 
from a MIDI keyboard and using the 
controllers (such as pitch and 
modulation wheels as screen 
controllers - A for effort, lads). I think 
■t will come into its own when auto- 
scoring, as they put it. from the files 
from other Hybrid Arts sequencers., 
this is where a lot of sweat is painlessly 
removed, 

Although step-time editing and 
input of notes is eminently possible, it 
is nonetheless a slow and tiresome 
process and not one t would want to 
do at any length. Bui auto-score and 
then fine-edit sounds a far better 
possibility. Of course il can also play 
back the score either via the internal 
Chip or any MO instrument left lying 
around. 

Only a couple of moans: rt only 
wntes on up to three staves at a time, 
so symphonic scores are out; it 
doesn't do the alto clef, so that 
scuppers any chance of whting for 
viola (shame'); and when you drop 
notes in with the mouse, especially 
above or below the stave, it is very 
much a hit-and-miss affair. A window 
that told you what note was under the 
mouse when in "note insert' mode 
would save a lot of squinting. I was 
running high resolution, have good 
eyesight and found it exasperating. To 
you. the cost of EZ-Score Pius is 
CB4.95. 

HybrKJ Arts are also trying to 
establish a delight called HybnS witch 
as an industry standard - a program 
which allows other programs to 
remain resident m the RAM and swap 
from one to another. Not an original 
idea but useful. 

Ail Ihese programs came from 
Hybrid Arts whose UK address is: 
Syndromic Music, 24-26 Avenum 
Mews, London, N10 3WP 

The next issue has Ihe promised 
MSX music review with lots of mfo on 
how to get the best from MSX. Sorry 
the Archie didn't get a look in but for 
various technical and postal reasons 
n didn't quite happen. Hang on in 
there. As ever the problem page is 
open. 








$fl 



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K** A0 



C&MH 




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0*~(if 



f*£fe /*% 



WOOLW0RTHS 



GETTING 
ADVENTUROUS 



STEEL SHAVINGS 



State-of-the-art adventures for 16-bit machines may took and 
play wonderfully, causing players to yonder open-mouthed at 
the complexity and beauty of the things, but who do we turn to In 
times of drought? The faithful old Spectrum. If not for Sir Olive's 
black box of magic there would be but one adventure to review 
this month, and that Just wouldn't do - - - would it? 

There are rumblings, however, and not just from today's lunch; 
Magnetic Scrolls are about to launch Corruption for the Amiga 
(and if their track record is anything to go by conversions for 
every conceivable format will follow); Infocom are set to blow our 
minds with their range of infocomics and it is rumoured there is 
movement in the Level 9 camp . . . The adventure future is 
looking so bright we might not all be stuck with Shades. 

\ would like to thank Tony Bridge- the Grand Elf of yesteryear 
- for his exce llent perusal of STAC la st issue . H e ha $ since written 
to me to point out that due to old age and one too many pints of 
Tolkiens Tipple, he gave the wrong credit for Shymer, the 
adventure Supplied with STAC. It was written by Sandra Sharkey 
and not Pat Wmstanley. 




using 



Dtiuding cart oe reached i 

lid a f urjii of stairs. 

nwro is a aw, a voivo and n Porsche hara. 

ygomim mt 



Corruption - Th*y shovki hrvw torched the Volvo - 



Lift or going 



LEGEND OF THE SWORD 



Rain bird 

ATARI ST Diskette: £24.95 

Along time ago. in the 
days Of AMTIX 
magazine, i was sent 
an adventure from 
Silicon Soft for the Amstrad 
CPC 61 28. I remember 
being very frustrated as I 
was impressed with the 
game, but due to powers 
beyond my control (the 
magazine sadly folded) I 
could not review it. 
However* I am happy to 
report my frustrations have 
been relieved, and apart 
from that, the game, 
Legend Of The Sword, has 
reappeared for the Atari ST 
courtesy of Rain bird . . . 
and it is at least as good as 
I remember it. 

The inhabitants of Anar are 
protected from evil by a legendary 
mystical sword and shield 
However, the evil wizard. Suzar. 
(don't yawn, it gets better) 
attacked and wiped out an entire 
army with relative ease using 
mutated humarvoids, You and your 
band of five merry men have been 
volunteered by the king to find the 



sword and use it to destroy Suzar 
before ha grows powerful enough 
lo enslave the whole of Anar. 

The game opens with you and 
your group approaching the island 
of Anar on board a merchant ship 
- following your escape from the 
wizard's hordes on a raft . Your first 
decision is which of I he three 



displaying your current action or 
dilemma and present location. 
Only four colours are used for the 
pictures (as In the Amstrad version 
of yore) but the sequel. The Ftnat 
Baffle -s boasting 16-cotour 
graphical displays. To the right of 
these windows is a scroll 
displaying action/options 



S*QUt* 




ftjfc 



it 35 fc; I 



-7*., buJt «itt> ItMj moils 
,'r^OfB a stooe ehtajoe**, 
a Une or sa*o*e dk"irts uo«ard into the sunbl 
sfcyj. Vou also notice the face of a win 
suddenly .drae bac*. f*r*oftt the shack's efindow 
untie laofcm? cautiously abound vou hear a 
Faint QfaailirtQ r*^om beyond the ' 



i text, tomdmm grmphlc m and tosds* 
possible landing sites to use - 
from this point it gets tougher. 

The screen layout and control of 
the game are what make Legend 
Of The Sword work so well. Top of 
the page are the mam menu 
commands: Options. Cancel, 
Actions. Map and Execute, below 
this are two picture frames 



puntos - m britfisnt mdvmnturm 

available and an attractive map 
which scrolls (on the scroll) as you 
move around {the map can be 
enlarged to fullscreen size if one's 
eyesight is not what il was.) Below 
the scroll are the direction icons 
(N. SWIISI etc) and a candle 
depicting the sirength of the party. 
The bottom of the screen is for lbs 



more-than-adequate text 

descriptions and your typed input . 

The greatest part ol the game 
can be completed using the 
mouse to click on selected 
instructions and icons, but lor 
those of us who like to keep our 
fingers flexible, the game may be 
played using text input only, 

The atmosphere created by the 
thoughtful descriptions is tense 
and at times exerting - and the 
graphics add to it Moving from 
place to place is not 
acknowledged merely by an OK 
but by neat phrases such as 
Daviiie takes the lead as your 
party climbs the slippery steps to 
the small door at ihe top'. 

A HELPING HAND? 

interaction is a delight, moat 
inputs - those not completely 
obscure - are awarded with a 
satisfactory reply of one sort or 
another. Every action you 
undertake has at least two lines of 
descriptive text to inform of the 
results 

Legend Of The Sword is roost 
enjoyable to piay, there are many 
locations - all with a graphical 
representation - and plenty to do 
I spent a very happy lime iust 
wandering around Ihe kingdom ol 
Anar not achieving anything m 
particular, just enjoying the 
scenery (and persistently scoring 
0%) I was m lad quite privileged 
because Samara from our sister 



38/124TGM IX 008:7-88 



ADVENTURE 



- 



magazine CRASH, materialised 
by my s»de and demanded a go - 1 
could not refuse. Unfortunately 
Ums ended my stmt with legend Of 
The Sword, rest assured though, 
once Samara has disappeared 
bach to who knows where, I shall 
have another go I just hope 
that Harlequin character from 



ZZAP»64 doesn't want (o play 
he's mean. 



ATMOSPHERE 92% 
INTERACTION 90% 
OVERALL 91% 



INVESTIGATIONS 

Graphtext128K 

Spectrum 128K Cassette; £3.95 

Ip t's nice to see a new company entering the adventure 
market. Let's face it, there are few enough releases 
about at present. Investigations has been written by 
Paul Tomkins and Robert Radburn of Graphtexl 
128 using Gilsoft s PA W. It includes over 1 00 locations, 88 
objects and a 400-word vocabulary -all the ingredients of 
a promising adventure . . . have they got trie mix right? 



Tbt game takes place in and 
around Redboume Manor where it 
tnra ptr e s thai Lord Anthony 
Forbes has been murdered . . , 
and you are on the case. You have 
only 14 hours to solve Ihe 
dastardly deed before your 
department moves you on to 
something else. Luckily you have 
Hie help of another ace detective, 
Philip Keen, who follows you 
around and gives advice when he 
car, 

Grephtext claim the game is 
very use» -friendly in as much as 
you can move on to another 
problem if you get stuck at any 
pomi. It also reckons to have an 
answer for most inputs and offers 
lengthy EXAMINE descriptions. 



program an adventure that relies 
on the player undertaking certain 
tasks at particular times - 
especially using a utility such as 
PAW- because of the number of 
errors I come across in games of 
this ilk. I spent moat of my time in 
Investigations hanging around 
using the WAIT command, One 
strange happening occurred 
whilst in the cook's room. One is 
supposed to enter her wardrobe 
and hide ihe'e until she comes into 
the room, hides a key under her 
pillow and leaves. I managed to 
clamber in and out of the wardrobe 
while she was still in the room . . . 
she didn't notice me! Either she 
has a very large room with lots ot 
pieces to hide or she's deaf and 




TTm loading *er##rt holds clues to playing (ft* gam* and nvads ctose 
ftWMOJpaGlHI 



So putting aside my dislike for 
detective adventures - especially 
those with a time limit - I loaded 
(fie game. 

DEFECTIVE 
DETECTIVE 

I imagine it to be very drfficuK to 



blind. Either way it showed a lack 
of attention to detail. 

The graphics are nicety done but 
add nothing to the game, and the 
text descriptions are often so long 
that the MORE message is almost 
permanently on the screen. 

Character interaction is fairly 
basic with SAV TO, QUESTION 
and INTERROGATE only revealing 



informaton if you ask Ihe right 
person the right question at the 
right time or are carrying the 
coned ilern. However, the time 
limit is ample 1o glean some sort of 
indication of what is expected of 
you. and once on the right trail, 
investigations opens gp into a 
fairly enjoyable game, with the 
RAMSAVE/LOAO option adding to 
payability Unfortunately it is 
limited, with some solutions 
relying more on chance than 



detective work. Hopefully 
GrapMext's next product. Murder 
On The Manhattan will be a I Hue 
batter, 



ATMOSPHERE 53% 

INTERACTION 56% 
OVERALL 54% 



DR JEKYL AND 
MR HYDE 

The Essential Myth 

Spectrum 4flK: E7.95 

Mark Davies. Lee Hodgson and Andrew Dean 
together form Trie Essential Myth software 
company. Their previous exploits include Book Of 
The Dead and The Gacpac - the iatter being a 
compression and optimisation utility coupled with a font 
design facility for Incentive's Graphic Adventure Creator 



Or Jekyi And Mr Hyde - A Gothic 
Nightman} is reminiscent of Rod 
Pike's style - author of Pilgrim, 
Oracute, Frankenstein and 
Wottman, This is no bad ihing as 



phosphorus are the three main 
ingredients and they can ail be 
found with a little logical thought 
and character interaction. 
Unfortunately due to the game's 



HI* 

|r pHK corridor 

1 passes tHe 
Ki trlirns tiere on 
its way to tlic 
hack door. / 
wide staircase 
boas t ing a beau— 
t • fill jnalin&any 
banister also 
ascends at tliis 
point . 

I bear a low mutter of 
conversation from tlie Kitctten. 

o-o 

LISTEN 



A change is as good as m r»st, tor's hopm Jakyil doesn't gat arrested for him 
Chang* 



the man is a writer worth emulating 
- but does his influence work for 
The Essential Myth? 

Written using Oilsofts PAW. this 
adventure possibly tries too hard 
to create an atmosphere. It shoves 
prose down your throat until one 
begins to long for a brief 
command. However, I'm always 
one for a good read as well as a 
good game Qui does J And H 
provide the latter? . . . 

Arriving in three parts - at least 
value tor money is offered - part 
one (Dichotomies* concerns the 
good Doctor and his quest to 
make and drink the potion which 
transforms him into the bestial Mr 
Hyde. Salt, alcohol and 



very fast real-time element, one or 
two typing errors and you may find 
progress impossible 



HYDE AND SHRIEK 

Part two {Duality} can only be 
entered by use of a password 
gleaned from the closing scenes 
of part one. Slightly tougher than 

Dichotomies but with the same 
attention to detail, it's more 
enjoyable to play, especial ly as the 
real-time slows to a mora 
manageable pace. 

I found a bug!! The letter 



TGM TX 008:7-8839/124 



ADVENTURE 



accompanying the game staled 
that ail bugs would be ironed out 
before the game went on general 
release. However, I warn to 
mention this one . . . just in case 
the publishers have not come 
acmes it! One of the many useful 
commands is LAST, which lakes 
you back to your preceding 
location and; after traveling to 
Gaunt street m a cab and 
subsequently returning home I 
stood m my hallway and typed it, it 
took me back inside the cab which 
proceeded to take me to Reeve 
Lane, an as yet undiscovered 



address, where I found an estate 
agent. Obviously I could not 
interact much, as I knew not why I 
was there, but the presence of 
Such an error is worrying. 

The third part (Denouement) 
purports to be the toughest of the 
three. Again entered through a 
password, it probably is of at least 
the same standard as the other 
parts. Unfortunately I was not 
Supplied with the password and 
deadlines prevented me finishing 
part two. So l didn't play it. 

Overall J And H has a very 
professional feel about rt. 



including plenty of useful 
commands to aid the struggling 
adventurer; MEMSAVE/LOAD, 
AGAIN, OOPS, LAST, EXITS and 
WATT - most of which may be 
abbreviated. Character interaction 
ts also extensive wfrh commands 
such as Ask Poote about the 
caddy' and 'Say to Footman. 
How are you?* '. Sentences may 
be strung together via a comma or 
full stop and pronouns may be 
used. This, together with the 
attention to detail and atmosphere 
created by the over-the-top prose, 
make for a very worthwhile game. 



Soon to be released on ail major 
6-btt formats plus the Atari ST, Or 
Jekyi And Mr Hyde should do weH 
for The EssentiaJ Myth. 

The game is only available mail 
order at present: the address is: 
The Essential Myth, 54 Church 
Street, Tewksbury. Gtoa GL20 
SRZ. 



ATMOSPHERE US* 
INTERACTION 78% 

OVERALL 82% 



SKELVULLYN TWINE 



Eighth Day Software 

Spectrum 48K: £5.50 



E 



ighth Day Software, makers of such greats as Quann 
TuZ/a (recently revamped, renamed and rereteased as 
Federation), Faerie and fee Station Zebra hope to add 
to their list of successes with the strangely named 
Skelvultyn Twine. 

adventure, together with full 
instructions on how to play. The 
three parts of the game involve 
preparation for the quest, 
travelling toward the confrontation 
and finalry the meeting with 
Matcher, 

The first part opens with you in 
the village south of a sickle 
vendor's Shop- The first problem 
is how to get the sickle: not difficult 
once you ' ve found the piggy bank. 



Deserted as a suite of four 
programs for all Spectrums in 4BK 
mode, Skeivultyn Twine offers 
good value for money, Comprising 
an introductory database with 
graphics plus three text -only 
adventure programs, the whole 
package was designed as an 
interactive novel. The introduction 
presents an outline of the game- 
world and details the events 
preceding those depicted in the 



The most illogical puzzle in part 
one concerns a worm in the 
hallway and a sleeping hedgehog. 
I fefl there was insufficient 
information given to solve the 
problem and it may have players 
stumped fry some time. 



Part two involves travelling 
through the strange landscape in 
search of Tolan. You come across 
Jigbugs, Saw Beetles and 
Pfrumps. all of which have to be 
sussed out using the extensive 
examine command and used to 
your advantage, 

Part three - the arrival - ts an 
escape from dungeons, floating 
under balloons, rescuing Tolan, 
walking through fire and 
eventually, right at the end, 
beginning another quest. 

The only drawback with 
Sketvutiyn Twine is the fact that it 
is written with the now slightly 



dated Quill, illustrator. Patch etc 
Having said that, the only real 
nestnCtiOns are those ol input plus 
some system commands which 
modem utilities such as PAW 
incorporates 

Playing is enjoyable and most 
instructions have been anticipated 
by the authors, A good 
atmosphere is created by both the 
location and event descriptions 
and. although some of the 
inhabitants are a little strange, (hey 
are well-suited to the game-wond 
Taking into account the 
restrictions of the utility used to 
Create Sketvullyn Twine, the game 
is interesting and very playable 
and includes the aH-important 
incentive to finish the quest. 

ATMOSPHERE 71% 
INTERACTION 67% 
OVERALL 69% 



RESULTS OF TGM005 & TGM006 
COMPETITIONS 



We apologise for omitting the 
results last issue. Her* they are: 

WIN AN AMIGA (II) 
The answer was 28.80481 . The 
winner is Paul Merchant. Bucks 
SL7 1TN. 



THREE STOOGES 

WWvw- Shuran Booth, Skagnaai PES* SJT 
Bwitip MtChaal OtfWnay, SoU*> WtTfaJ 

L« ORG; Kan* ftopan, Clwyd LL10 BTY: 
Zaai B MM*> Tha HaBiiitamuV lan 
Etftando*. LhAi LS1 1 VHH. Richard 

MoraHtv Horfrtd NA3C 1 Hf*^ Btv*vn 

&aw»o n, L^nes Bgli TN M^Id J «aatalL, 

DhhI OH * 2 ♦HA^ Biny Of y UX CMr i^w*fl»MMn 
B3T MA D Orouv. Stat* STl WO: 



SB aacQ^piQDBni bna 

Gfcekman, London NWS tET; Andrew Purtn. 
London SWW JHO: Stswi MeCras, 
N«mwnlr*landBT430Z:P«*r Young. 
L»»ci CO 5*C; Stsonan Dawkms, Lw« 
LEI 5 flftfk PA jam**, S G««n CFB BWt 
ChrtaGarbutL£»aa>c£Sl3 iRR; Jam** 
Poinftald. £**** CO? SSO. John Shaw, 
QtMhn SKI* 4MB: Bay Onnliton. 
Edtoburari Em? sun : pnitin Da***. 
C a mws i TB1 1 2PN; T Harrten, CUHlmJ 
TS1 1 2NO- W Annta, Manchsctar M»SSB; 
Jonathan Burton, Surras RH3 T-Xt, Fbona 

a-wn London m* srt. 



FIREFLY COMPETITION 

Winner Tristram Moore, Surrey 
HH76QY. 



M34 80W. Staph** Boyd. Sv/r*yKT1 7 2BU; 

HUHw 3^niDV HvanTn! I Pe4 ILJj 5#fT+Ofl 

M*£**aVCh*Afttl Manas; tMthwmt Fa^orv, 
Carnfertdoa CB2 *TD; JK ManUpn, Dorsal 
om2MW;Mark5h«li*»k«.Pvf»<lKHOtign 
PES US; Cham Uawrthya. E*at Sua*** tm 



3LG; Dawi Kaaar. Chaanir* WA15 OHS, 
David Jarrm BtiMvan, W Midlands WSl 
3AX; ESwwtJ Ori»rw. Scotland PA 14 «HH. 
Jonathan Bur. W Midlands BBS BED; Adam 
Patacchol*., Hart* AL5 1 JW-. L*roy 
Bsgw il, Dovon EXlu OOU; Ki a r an Da Aoa. 
Co* OKy. Ir*l«nd KP Fos*Sf . Cl lll laU B - 

rsia SUH; Mh-haal Poyrrtar . Darby*. QES 

WW: Justin Hwwrin, Staffs ST 18 OPQ: 
Stapnan Canraaf. York YQ2 2JF Stuart 
Brown. W Yorki LS* -*BV : Austin Bnntm. 
B*rtm CM371AU. Tim Law**, Wore* WBH 
4XO. Cart OouAon, Horto* fWB» +MB. 
Simon Parrfaid. Ov*nt HP3 10O: Adam 
Ftatehar, QVm QUO STD. 

SPYCATCER COMPETITION 

C Norton. Cambs PE1J SBT; PbMra 
Scetnay. Bnatoi BS» WO; Davtd Brawn, 
S Homos DtQT OCA; Paul Hot**, Hanta 
SOI S*o>. Staphan Oawfcina, Latcs LEU 
9RR: JMtaW WWam*. Surray SMI 4JH; 
T Harslon. CwwAand TSr! 2WO, HW 
Farrow, f i wai M»»JQ; lan EVwrtdo., 
Uddh LS11 BNN: Kawn ftoa. Suftaw. HfOB 
5JO, Jdrtwa WoodMy, Borkt SO JPfc Mad 
Comartofd, Covanlry CVS 2GP, Sua 
Waflars, MHton Ksynas MK 1 4 SHO; O «o»», 
Oilord 0X3 oftu , B Waattwslona, Kant; 
PH Partar. Laads LS 1 5 BEY; S Say*r*v Otes 
OL 1 5 SW: Ola*«Ow 0*5 BBB; Davtd 
Coyartay. Ctavatand TSt 4 SOG: J BK aaili iy, 
SurrayAHOr 



l«NE- 



C APTAIN BLOOD 
COMPETITION 

Winner Andrew Gore*, Hants 

GU34 5AJ. 

Ftunrwrs-uft: Ptul WMajnd, London E4; 

EMntai Rftffi, LJrwA Pt 1 1 3PE; Sn S#y*^*r 
SuT*yKTl£?PO Awie*lpan4u«a.Stohs. 
Oi-Tfartl STl TUS. Oraharn Marton, Kant 
OA5 11*8; Jarsmy Fanton, Osort OKt4 1LU: 
MI*.*ClaA. Doirsat BH19 1DU; Jonathan 
IgtaMons. London SWS JTJ; MidwH 
Parcy , Ejh t RAIT DOR; Paui Knaofls, Harti 
EHS8RF. 



. . . AND NOW 

TGM006 ■ . ■ 



WIN AN AMIGA (III) 

Winner receives an Amiga ASOO 
and 1081 colour monitor, and he is 
lan Stone . W Mids B65 SRG . Well 
done lan! 

BIO NIC COMMANDOS 

GO! offered an Omnibot 2000 
Robot and a copy of Boric 
Commandos, which goes to Vikki 
YeateS. Avon BA2 2HU. 

Hunnars-up lost a Spotxj! and oamali: 
Stavan MtCiM, N traumd BT4 30Z; 
POcnavd DIM. Kant Th» BAB; Cnrialoohor 
Sunray KT1S ZJ«: PhMp Launn. 

TSUWJ; B Bradsford. Staffs 



Ronald 



WS18MP 
Andinarasl 



I |iiTTTia ipim 
Farmoton. wAn-at L43 7YH; Scott Dyson, 
Ba n wi u tiiii B*22EL; Aii ta sw Mi Bii. 
Marxiwdtaf M» jpS^Tlm attiy 
3nuCDwnmt^r\ Cwviwnd T5B Ipuuj Swttwi 
Paang. Btrwanoham S3* WU; Stmon 
Coopar , tSuaau TH34 IAZ; Qanial 
Lagdan. tttMtH EK4* 4BB; J Tarnpia, 

cIMa u*J3 4^^t^ JH bAOCItC^. AnVWlCll new 

1EM- Hft BnwJnw, SooBdnd FKJ 7HA; 
Rooart O'Qonnan, BartsSLl SPR; 
Matthsw Taykor^ W Susaac ftH 1 T BAF; Paul 
Mobbs, Harrta S02 4ftP, ftoai Allan 
Brignton BM1 fJQ. Pmwr Carroll, Tyna ft 
Waar ME40 4XT ; Jafon Colaa. Co Down. 
N Irsland; Slavan WiajLatt, Manohavtsr, 
M23 BHQ; M B*rt»f. Oartjy D6) 7KA; 
Stapnan Graham. Cumbria CA2 TOB, 
Arxh-sw flobfcisdn, Dvrwl BH7 94.W; Adam 
Coulaon. Ba ilia m i w an BS lSft, Stapnan 
Morgan. Northu«noarl*nd HE4? flJL; Lss 

Oawtaa, W Suaaax ftHlT SRO. Mart: Dtton. 
LancaPFQ t US: Paui Johnson, Surrsy CU« 
dEO. 

FLINTSTONES COMPETITION 

From Grandslam Enlertamment, 
the top prizes - a Ftintstone video 
(VHS). a pair of Flintstones Boxer 



Shorts and a copy of the game - 
goes to: 

Brian <narry. £»**■ S515 8M0: Sanon 
Cdtotough. Cliwaaid TS» KM Brian 
Oubx Co Clara. IflUnB, Bamartl A*Mon. 

Kpfl Tfi I 2JP". AjwdrTftw TwAfnj Tyim 41 Htv 

PwaatAiT. 

And Bto rhri s i c a nd plaoa praas go to; lan 
Eth+udoa, Laada LSI 1 BNN. I*n FowUs. 
W LotNan EHS4 «*J. Urn* ftoy, MMon 
Ksynas MKS TOA. Payld Ca*rfc, OlMtw 
Off? 1PO Dntd Barnan, Barm ftOa 5YL 
Afia*m*rlOrumar*-up{|Btiria0ansa'PaU 
Cochran*. DundasDOl 1 JU. Snaun Moora, 
tJ*»*n PLe 1TP. Jams* Haw^a*. Surrsy 
KT1S »E. Toby Ourm. W o tUno ham NOB 
1PY; IUw*n Canny, Mancnastar MKBHO: 
Stuart McKachma. Maahu* Ul 5LB; Ptal 
Manh. Surrey CB33JO;Chns Or s*n, Lanes 
WM3 Mm. Oarry Man. Surray SMJ 9JW. 
M*r«n Co*, London SE t 4UA 

SIERRA COMPETITION 

DO Powell. Herefordshire HB6 
8PJ, wins ActiviSKjns SIERRA 
ON-LJNE catalogue of games for 
his machine. The rurmers-up are: 

CHo«wnd.SumnTW»0NJ. Angui Ftaa. 
Scotland PASB 4BY. N Sumnsf , Ohaarara 
W A13 OOF; Shawn HUM**. Co Ourt*#m DL4 
20E; Barn WoomtL York YOl *0A. 
Cnrtawna wVson, Lanes FTT BBS; Chrts 
Offard. W Otamoman SAl D «OC Sttonan 
Ptddaon. E Suaaw TM2J 1*X; CM Ormas. 
Eaaai SSI 4 1 LJ; M MacLaod, Scotland 
rVSB 7YO. 

TOM QUESTIONNAIRE 
Thank you for sending in the 
questionnaire forms - well have 
details in the next issue. We drew 
the forms Out and the winner gets 
ESQ of software, plus a TGM f- 
shirt. He is Matthew Wammr. 
Derbyshire DE5 7QA Four 
ruiwiefs-up get £20 worth of 
software, plus a T-shirt: 

Banon Bim a, Bris tol B914 «B: Frank* 

, wCfMlfTIr DlVW rWH*CKainaTM l 1 

(44JF ftai 
rorti HK3 BXA. 



Argys PA34 4JF, ftaymond MWoJ-y. 
WYor* 



40-1 24 TGM TX 008:7-88 



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MMC Send erwque/P.O./Acce&s, Visa No, & fluplry date lo. 


TfYtfktfje Ltd, 77 Hortti Slreol, Romfofd, £ssb» RH1 IDA- Please stale make spud modei of ccwnputw wtwn ordofing. 


Ptf inc UK an 


orders avif £5,00: Less man ES.OO and Europe add ft. 00 p« 


Item; Elsewhere, please add F2.00 per Hem ten airmail. 


TEL, 


ORDERS 070ft T052T1 






TGM IX 008:7-8841/124 



COMPETITION 




LISTEN TO THE SOUNDS 



Play spot the ball with ADDICTIVE, win a 
Midi HiFi system and become a real 
FOOTBALL MANAGER TWO! 



n the beginning there was light and shortly after that came FooOtmtt 

IMmnm g mr - one of the most popular (and longest-lived) games in the 
history of software. This June sees the release of its sequel Foothmti 
M a n ager II from Addkrthra written by the onginal S author, Kevin Toms 
Football Manager tl incorporates many new and advanced features over 
Its predecessor as you use managerial skiffs to wheel and deal your way to the 
top of the football league. Starring right at the bottom of the league, train and 
coach players or just go poach them from other teams, it alt adds up to a super 
strategy game with the same addictive appeal as before. 



SPOT THAT BALL! 
And ten other words . . . 
FOOTBALL 
BALL MIDI 

MANAGER KEVIN 

TOMS TWO 

TOSHIBA ADDICTIVE 

GOAL SOCCER 



TURN THE TABLES WITH 



are so impressed wrth 
Football Manager il that they're 
offering a top prize of a Toshiba Midi 
MH system for this competition. 
Complete witti double-cassette deck. 
five-band graphic surround, radio 
(FM, MW, LW with 15 preset stations}, 
record deck, two-way bass-refte* 
speakers and the all-important 
compact disc player - it's all you 
coufd warn. Along with that the winner 
receives a copy of Football Manager tl 
(Spectrum, Commodore, Amstrad 
CPC. Atari ST. Amiga, IBM PC 
versions available) signed by Kevin 
Toms, as will the 25 runners -up. 



OVER 'ERE JOHN, ON THE 
HEAD 

. . , but preferably in the post box. 
Once you have discovered all the 
words listed and ringed them in the 
Spot The Ban wordsquare. fill m the 
coupon, cut it out (or send a 
photocopy) and stick it in an envelope 
addressed to: NEVER MIND THE 
BALLS COM*, THE GAMES 
MACHINE, PO Bom tO T Ludlow 
Shropmhir* SYS f 00, Entries must 
arrive here by first post July 21 and 
any players who don t follow the rules 
as detailed in the masthead will be 
shown the red card and sent for an 
early shower. 



H 


1 


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A 


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G 


E 


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L 


L 


u 


L 


A 


E 


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T 


N 


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A 


T 


A 


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K 


A 


o 


G 


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1 


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S 


O 


T 


B 


F 


A 


P 


N 


B 


D 


1 


V 


E 


K 


1 


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T 





A 





T 


W 


p 


U 


E 


C 


1 


D 


1 


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1 


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L 





V 


T 


R 


E 


c 


C 


o 


S 


M 


O 


T 


1 


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1 


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1 


D 


D 


A 


F 


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V 


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A 





D 


1 


C 


T 


1 


B 


E 



Name 

Address 



Postcode 
Computer owned 



42/124 TGM TX 008:7-88 




REVIEWS 



LEAP REVIEW 

74 ■ DARK SIDE 






gasi&ssffiff 




We've gone ov«r 

the edge and taken a trip into 

the Dark Side - it's the summer's hottest 

arcade/puzzle adventure which takes you deeper Into 

the world of Incentive - a Freescape routine already experienced In 

last year's DrfWev, 




SPECTRUM 48/128 


Every Second Counts 


65 


Kamov 


76 


Thundercats 


64 






Great Giana 




Lazer Tag 


62 


Vixen 


78 


Beyond The Ice Palace 


l 81 


Sisters (The) 


61 






AMIGA 




Blood Brothers 


53 


Hercules 


71 








Cyber Knights 


47 


Infiltrator II 


54 


ATARI ST 




Armageddon Man 


58 


Dark Side 


74 


Kamov 


76 






Great Giana 




Desolator 


80 


Lazer Tag 


62 


Alien Syndrome 


59 


Sisters (The) 


61 


Earth Light 


52 


Monopoly 


75 


Bermuda Project 


76 


Interceptor 


44 


Every Second Counts 


65 


Oops! 


64 


Football Manager II 


72 


Leatherneck 


66 


Gutz 


54 


Patton Vs Rommel 


70 


Gauntlet II 


68 


Rockford 


81 


Hercules 


71 


Sons Of Liberty 


79 


Gold Runner II 


46 






Lazer Tag 


62 


Vixen 


78 


Leatherneck 


66 


IBM PC 




Soldier Of Light 


63 






Masters Of 








Vixen 


78 


AMSTRAD CPC 




The Universe 


57 


Arac 


81 










Pandora 


62 


Driller 


63 


COMMODORE 64/ 




Blood Brothers 


53 


Phantasm 


70 


Platoon 


79 


128 




Captain Blood 


51 


Platoon 


79 










Dark Side 


74 


Revenge II 


46 


SEGA 




Alien Syndrome 


59 


Desolator 


80 


Stir Crazy 


57 






Desolator 


80 


Every Second Counts 


65 


Sun dog 


51 


Rescue Mission 


58 



68 a GAUNTLET II 

The sequel to the original romps In on the Atari ST this month. 
Complete with alt the features of the arcade coin-op, Gavnttot fl has 
had everyone stuck to the screen. 

44 ■ INTERCEPTOR 

Join the mile-high clue and soar around the landscape of Sen 
Francisco bay in Electronic Arts's dazzling, filled-3-D combat 
simulator, with enough arcade action to keep you playing until the 
pigs fly home. 




3S ■ LEGEND OF THE SWORD 

Silicon Software's graphical adventure out now from Rainbird 
combines atmospheric prose, easy-to-use functions, great 
graphics, a scrolling map . . - are we seeing the perfect adventure? 
Very nearly says Rob Steel. 

61 ■ THE GREAT GIANA SISTERS 

The delectable double-act gets into some heavy platform action, 
and could be related to a couple of Bros familiar to console players- 
It's over from German company Rainbow Arts courtesy of GO! 

NEXT MONTH . . . 

. . . we'll have loadsagames to play with . , . Road Blasters, Mickey 
Mouse, Last Ninja II, Ring Wars, 19, Skate Crazy, Dream Warrior, 
Faery Tale, more Bionic Commandos, end we're hoping for some 
brand-new Nintendo games. 



i 



TGM TX 008:7-8843/124 



SKIES THE LIMIT 






INTERCEPTOR 

Electronic Arts 



The McDonnell Douglas/Northrop F/A-18 Hornet and 
the General Dynamics F-16 are two of the most 
advanced multirole aircraft in the United States flight 
armoury - and they haven't been ignored when it 
comes to flight simulations, sub LOGIC already covered 
both aircraft in Jet, Mirror soft in Falcon and others have 
flown them too. Now it's the turn of Electronic Arts to take 
to the skies. Interceptor was designed and coded in 
America by Bob Dinnerman 



The interceptor of the title ts for 
roost part the F-18 Hornet, though 
an F-16 rs also on standby for 
certain missions and practice 
mgniS- 

Optoons at the start allow for 
demonstration nights - the 
computer controlled plane takes 
the player through a quick flight in 
the aircraft, prechce flights - in 
which the player can improve on 
hts general flying and combat 



as demanding as flight and 
combat Put the brakes on. power 
up to full throttle and kick in the 
afterburners to take Off Once 
airborne, practice combat 
manoeuvres and get used to the 
controls of what is a very agile 
aircraft. 

There's an enemy MiG in the 
area and experts can opt to tackle 
it while beginners had best leave 
well alone! Once proficient in 




Training is *n essentiMl pmrt of becoming * proficient pilar 




tantamount to committing suicide. 
If you manage to get the jet down 
in one piece, your status is saved 
to disk and the mam menu can be 
accessed to start the first of the 
further missions- 



PRESIDENTIAL 
SMEAR 



The first mission is pnmariry 
reconnaissance, An unidentified 
aircraft is heading for the 
Enterpnse and an F- 1 8 is required 
to intercept and identify the 
potentially hostile intruder The 
rules of engagement are: do not 
hre until fired upon. The best tactic 
is to stand off and use the 
targeting computer of the missile 
section to identify me aircraft and 



then return to base. Those wishing 
to eliminate the aircraft can do so 
but the primary task rs |usf lo 
identify rt. A good mission to serve 
as an introduction to the game. 

Mission two is a defensive task 
in which the President's personal 
airliner. Air Force One, is coming in 
to land at San Francisco Airport 
Two MiG-29 aircraft are in the 
vicinity and beginning an attack 
run on the airliner, despite the fact 
that their actions are likely to start 
WWil I. The mission is engage the 
enemy and prevent them shooting 
down the airliner. However, if 
you're feeling dastardly you, too, 
can shoot down the President's 
plane: the plume of smoke 
belching from the stricken airliner 
as rl plummets earthwards is a 
neat effect. The mission doesn't 
take much effort to complete and 
is more a test of pilot flight- 
endurance Skills. 



44 124TGM TX 008:7-88 






REVIEWS 






PREJUDICED 

For mission three, (wo F- 16s took 
off from a coastal airbase and 
headed for the Soviet Union. It is 
your task Q*k>1 ing either an F - 1 6 Or 
MB} lo bring them back, and if 
tf»y persist in their defection they 
an* to be slopped with extreme 
prejudice M 6s have a top-secret 
F.CM (Electronic Counter- 
Measures} system, so don't rely 
loo much on missiles to tiring your 
defectors down, To add to the 
mission's toughness, two MiG- 
29s are escorting the defectors, 
iters to harass any preventative 
measures. 

Fuil use of close-range and 
missile- range combat skills is 
required together with shrewd use 
of the fuel-guzzling afterburner if 
you're to Succeed. 

Mission four is one of the 
toughest as the F-lfl pilol is 
required to locate a pilot downed 
in the sea, drop rescue pods 
nearby and lend off attacks from 
M*G-29s Rescuing the pilot is the 
primary objective as he can onty 
survive a Nnvted time m the water 
The mission tests your ability to fly 
low and slow in the search-and- 
testue rote as well as Skill in 
corneal against enemy jets-. 

CRUISING 

ALONG 

Mission five tests your skill In 

taking a direct course to a target 
as Quickly as possible, avoiding 
time-consuming engagements 
with MtG-29s as you attempt to 
destroy a cruise missile headed for 
a nearby airbase The missile only 
lakes nine minutes to reach its 
target, so tune is of the essence. 
The M«G-29s are around to lead 
you away from the missile as it 
makes its lerminal dive into Moff el 
airbase, wiping out much of San 



,-..-- 



jco m the pre 





Sp**dmg awtf from in* *n*my cmrrfmr in mission *ix mftmr rtmmiing dmsdfy ftdowrj 



The final mission is to take out a 
submersible earner which has 
been launching MiG-29s and is the 
source Of all your troubles in 
previous missions. The instruction 
manual requests you approach 
the earner at under 1 00 feet so as 
to avoid radar detection and 
subsequent interception by MiGs 
In play, one lactic we used was to 
engage the enemy aircraft with 
guns first before using missiles on 
the enemy carrier. The carrier 
takes a lot of punishment so 
refuelling and rearming is 
essential. 

If the Interceptor crashes, its 
back onto the aircraft carrier or 
airbase runway to continue with 
the mission. Statistics on aircraft 
flight are recorded on disk for each 
mission, such as the amount of 
ammunition used, number of 
crashes, missions started and 
missions completed. Once 
completed, a mission can be 
replayed at a higher skill level, the 
scenario changes (however the 
substance of the mission remains 
the same) and the enemy aircraft 
are superior combatants. 

SEC0ND-TO-NONE 

Passive on -board systems include 
chaff, flares and ECM as well as 
the more familiar offensive 
weapons, namely Sidewinder and 
AMFIAAM missiles and a cannon 
for close range use ff missiles miss 
targets The enemy are likewise 
armed with the latest weaponry 
and use them just as effectively as 
yourself. 

11 has become the norm in ftighl 
simulations to provide 'spotter- 
plane' views: Interceptor has 
eight- way exterior views, as weii 
as up. down, side, rear and front 
cockpit views. A brilliant extra is 
the ability for the pilot lo turn his 
head round m the cockpit to 



visually track aircraft and objects 
in near airspace. Although this has 
been done before in Flight 
Simulator 3 it works much better in 
interceptor. Zoom-in and zoom- 
out magnification is available 
along with a map of the atW- The 
outside views of the plane are 
nothing short of excellent and the 
graphics are second-to- none in 
detail and animation. The plane 
moves smoothry, speed is kept at 
a sensible level and you really do 
have control at your fingertips 

interceptor combines the 
realism of flight simulations wtlh 
the fast action of Top Gu/rfthe fiim) 
fighter combat extremely well. The 
solid graphics move very quickly 
indeed, though not as fast as 
subLOGIC s Jet. but they are far 
Superior in detail, definition and 

Minion complete, iet'f go hom* 




look real in comparison with J&f s 
simpler graphics. When it comes 
to realism, ease of control and 
state-of-the-art graphic and sonic 
presentation tntercmplor is the 
ace. 



Diskette: £24.95 

Sound I* excellent, the 
engine ch a ng ing ton* In 
retabon to me aircraft's 
speed Is well done and the 
arte* uu i w •■ through an 
external view, are awitomt 
(especially wtth th* volume 
up full.) Cannon fire FX, 
however, ana weak and could 
have been b e e fe d up a tittle. 
If you have 1 Mbyte memory, 
ttvore ana extra sound FX, 
including trtJ* tune and wind 
whistling past when you 
eject, but they ar» minor 
extras which don't really use 
the extra 500 Kbytes. Sin 
missions are not a lot, but 
they are all highly enjoyable 
end packed with action, and 
chal lenge all areas of piloting 
skills. It's a shame there's 
only the Sen Francisco area 
to fly around. 

OVERALL 92% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Electronic Arts say that no other versions of Interceptor are 
planned, Apart from the lack of a market for an ST version In 
America {where the program was written), there appears to be 
no reason why ultimately It shouldn't com* out On ST or PC. 



"When It comes to realism, ease of control 
and state-of-the-art presentation 



eptor Is ace." 



TGM TX 008:7-8645/124 



RUNNING FOR GOLD 



GOLORUNNER II 



Microdeal 



he original Goldrvnner was by Steve Bak (author of 

1 Karats Kid ff and the more recent Return To Genesis}* 

Goidtvnner H concerns the reawakening of the war 

against space pirates in a fast, vertically scrolling 

shoot- em-up by Alex Herbert and John Dower, with 

music by ubiquitous David Whrttaker (Rob Hubbard 

created the prequel's score) and the voice of Virgil Pino 

rings out courtesy of ST-Reptay. 

transporter car* and shooting cars 
r e l easeo a roboi but also alerts a 
recovery craft which picks the 



It has been 50 years since 
GoWronner first took on. and 
destroyed , the space pirates of the 
Triton Ring- worlds SOM which 
time Earth refugees have lived in 
peace and advanced m 
Technology sufficiently to enable 
them to create robot defenders. As 
fast as computers and totally 
fearless, the robots proved highly 
effective against the pirates - until 
they were captured Ina sneak ra»d. 
Now they are held prisoner on 1 6 
platforms m deep space, heavily 
guarded by pirates. The only 
chance for |he human race might 
be if a lone piol can get through to 
the platforms and rescue the 
robots. 

As m Gotdrunner. your artip 
moves speedily over the vertically 
scrolling platforms. dodging 
protruding towers and buildings. 
There are fewer lowers than m the 
ongmai, but may are |ust as lethal 



robot up. Destroy the craft and you 
can collect the robot - speed is 
essential as it disintegrates withm 
seconds Up to five robots can be 
carried at any one time, to rescue 
mora, you have to drop robots into 
teleportar canisters from where 
they are returned to ihe safety of 
the Ring-worlds. 

FASTER, BUT . 

The defence systems, recovery 
Ships and fighters cannot directly 
destroy your ship, but their shots 
invariably deflect you in to a 
building - which does destroy the 
craft, Radioactive dust clouds 
absorb your lasers, while dairying 
too long on each platform brings in 
a motharship carrying enemy 
fighters Smart bombs 

occasionally fry down the screen; 
collecting and using tham 



Robots travel around tracks in 

Th* mo thftlhip +wr*tt> yOut OtekinQ attmmpts mttttmmndof 

*uec***titfty comptottd f#v#f 




destroys everything on the 
platform except for the mora 
powerful enemy ships, Once all 
robots ere coMected or destroyed 
a friendly motharship comes into 
view and docking with it takes you 
on to the next platform. 

Gofdrunnor U Is noticeably faster 
than rts predecessor {which was 
last indeed), and it's considerably 
mora colourful and varied. But 



improvement though it may be 
graphically, it offers precious Utile 
more: the base formula is hmrted, 
and as it's the same throughout ai 
16 levels, the repetitive gameplay 
and only average challenge soon 
tell There are many shoot-em* 
ups for the ST, and even with its 
quality presentation. Gc^drunrw If 
lust doesn't have the holding 
power of such games as Xenon. 




7h# laity with tttm mystic vnitm took* on M your thip takmm Itm tumps from tnm 
irm j r -ST mct+mns 



ATARI ST Diskette: £19.96 

Microdeal are also offering two data disk* at C5.9S each,, 
containing further platforms with different scrolling 
backgrounds. These are merely graphical re workings of me 
existing platforms and offer nothing new in play variation but 
(hey may wail appeal to those who want to get the most out of 
the gam e , 

OVERALL 65% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Look out for an Amiga version in the very near future - same price 
as Atari ST, 



1 . . . faster tti an its predecessor, but rep- 
etitive gameplay and only average chal- 
lenge soon tell." 



VERSION UPDATE 



Mastertromc 

Atari ST, Diskette: £9.99 



THI&s the third in Jeff M inters 
series and was originally 
by MJuD. for the 
Commodora 64 where it earned a 
ZZAP' Silver Medal The camels 
are in fad 90-foot mutants known 
as MetaBeasts alijlnaty 
developed by humans to fight m 
an interstellar war. After several, 
urtimatety successful dashes with 
the Zzyaxtan enemy. the 
MetaBeasts went into hibernation 
for six: millennia until the Zzyaxian 
threat once more loomed over the 



galaxy. 

Revenge fl begins by presenting 
Ihe Wave Select Grid with 100 
horizontally -scrolling waves 

ultimately available to the player. 
At the start of the game, however, 
you can only select the first wave. 
The MetaBeasts weapons are 
laser bullets and bombs, the latter 
being released when the 
MetaBeaSt takes Off. At first the 
control system is a little awkward, 
but practice solves this. A mora 
serious flaw is me presentation 




Try not to gmt tfi* hump at you tight 
th* oft b+mt 9n»my in ffw out*» (rf# 

tfmsdtyemtrmi 

which is uniformly mediocre: 
Winter's psychedelic Pac-Man 
ghosts, deadly washing machines 
and vicious Amiga disks all seem 
vary flat and 2-D. Sanies are 
similarly basic- Nevertheless the 
essential ptayabiiity of the combat 



remains unaffected. 

If the first level is completed 
successfully the player earns 
credrts which can be used to buy 
extra weapons such as shields, 
smart bullets and even an extra 
beaslie. These last only for the 
next wave so there's a substantial 
strategy element in mapping 
waves so that you have the right 
weapons for hard waves, and 
reserve easy waves for when 
credit is tow. This strategic 
element, together with the need to 
carefully plan progress across the 
grid, provides an impressive 
contrast with hordes of graphically 
grabbing, but Shallow ST shoot 
em -ups. 

ATARI ST: OVERALL 03% 



46 124TGM TX 008:7-88 



REVIEWS 



LEGO WARRIORS 



CYBERKNIGHTS 



Robert T Smith, programmer of Cyberknights, is 
better known as the author of bestselling wargames 
such as Amhem, Desert Rats and Vulcan (all 
published by CCS) Bob decided to "test the waters' 
of his programming capabilities by writing this arcade 
game. But has he captured the magic of his previous 
products in this futuristic combat game with the inevitable 
strategy overtones? 



Cybarknighis are robotic warriors 
of the future, android gladiators 
fighting to the death m battle 
arenas Either one player fight s ten 
.increasingly more powerful 
computer opponents or two 
players tight n out against each 
other 

The game is in two parts, a 
OeSignW program through which 
a Cyberknight is boil up and 
equipment upgraded, and the 
combat game where constructed 
Cyberknights are baptised in lire. 

WORKSHOP 

The designer program is an icon- 
driven workshop; equipment can 
be tried out on the player's 
Cyberknight. The base 

components are power source, a 
body to connect up all the 
equipment (and provide armoured 
protection) and a head on which 
firepower turrets can be 
posrtioned 

Wrthoul power the robot won't 
be going anywhere; likewise. 
adding too much equipment with 
a weak power source also stops 
trie Cyberknight m its l racks Each 
unit has its own merits and 
disadvantages: atomic generators 
are expensive, bulky but extremely 
powerful; solar packs are 
ightweigtil but weak and, as they 
are positioned on the robot's 
head, exposed to attack. Besi 
power pack, we found, is the 
chemical f uelcell type: good value 
for money and it provides a 
moderate power level. 

AddrhonsJly. batienes can be 
purchased for extra power - but 
they don't recharge during play - 
and energy absorbers are another 
power source to add 10 the pri mary 
system In all cases a backup 
system is required in case the 
primary power source is destroyed 
or damaged. 

The body falls into two 
categories: plastic and metal 
build Plastic bodies are 
lightweight, provide protection 
against acid and electrical attacks 
but prove useless against 
radiation, Meial bodies are the 
opposite, heavy and limited in 
space lor equipment storage, but 
give good protection against 
radiation grenades. 

Packs can be purchased and 



attached to provide mountings for 
other weapons and serve as extra 
armour, Among thern are a 
flamethrower pack and a jeipack. 
the latter best used with a lighter 
robot to keep fuel consumption 
down. 



and level-connecting lifts. Bags of 
money are conveniently left on th& 
floor. The enemy robot (either the 
player or one of the ten computer 
opponents) stalks the arena 
looking for its opposite number. 
Destroying enemy robots is 
rewarded with extra cash, but you 
need to survive other robot attacks 
before any money can be spent on 
improving your Cyberknight 

Waiting at the bottom of litis is a 
good tactic, allowing the player to 
fire up and destroy the opponent's 
armour before he gets into a fmng 
position. Mines can also be laid to 
restrict enemy movement (n 
combat the robot head and 
protective armour can be lost, but 
it's game over if the body is 
destroyed. An alternative method 
of winning is to ring a bell found 
within two rooms in Ihe arena 
once rung, the opponent must 
locate a bell and ring Ft in response 



or lose the game. If two players are 
m action, each has their own 
separata side-on view ol their 
robot and the immediate area. 

The designer is easy to use 
through the icons, although some 
are a iitue contusing m 
appearance. The display is dean 
and there's a real sense ot 
satisfaction in seeing the robot 
building up and turning into a 
lighting machine. The program 
then fads flat on its lace wilh what 
is a very simple, below average, 
multiscreen combat game using 
appallingly simple graphics, very 
weak sound and mediocre use of 
colour. In combat, most weapons 
are little diflerent in operation and 
effect, making the hours designing 
and experimenting pointless 
Cvfjarfcnighfs may be a technically 
complex program, but much 
depth and potential has been lost 
in the poor gameptay 




SPECTRUM Cassette: £7.95, Diskette: El 4,95 

When design and experimentation is complete, finished 
Cyberknights are saved to tape/disk or RAM and die combat 
program loaded in. With two piayers. on* must save to tape. 
loading both combat and saved data. Sound is minimal, 
especially disappointing in the game Itself. Much more was 
expected graphically and In gamepley. A brilliant Idea which 
loses out in its final execution. 

OVERALL 44% 



it'* &nfOyat>l* creating customized droidn. g shame the gam* is such m l*t down 

Once the robot Shape is 
finalised, only weapons remain, 
and how many depends on cost, 
weight, power requirements and 
the number of lurret mountings 
available. Once a weapon has 
been chosen (and ammunition 
purchased if necessary), a 
direction has to be chosen for the 
weapon to face before lurret 
installation, 

Each component has a fixed 
space Into which the various types 
of equipment can be added. On 
earlier levers cost is ihe 
determining factor when rt comes 
to equipping ihe robot bul as more 
money is made, larger capacity 
heads, bodies and packs can be 
bougm. although the level of 
power drain rises as a result 

THE GAME 

The arena is set over a numerous - 
flipscreen complex of corridors 



OTHER VERSIONS 

No other game formats »r« expected. 



11 A brilliant Idea which falls flat on Its face 
In Its final execution." 



TGM TX 008:7-8847/124 




1 



YOUR SEARCH FOR THE ULTIMATE 



A bead of sweat gently strokes your 
brow. Fmgers tort ured with anticipation. 
Eyes riveted to the screen. Nothing can 
stop you now. The record score is one 
carefully aimed FIG missile away. Ready. 
Aim, Fire! 

Oh no! ......missed. 

If you live and breathe Personal Computers 
there's one event that shouldn't be missed. 
Personal Computer World has always been 
the target (or people wanting to see the very 
best in leisure computing. But this year 



we've set our sights on making it even bigger 

and even better 

To reflect this new direction, we've also 

retrtled the event The Personal Computer 

Show' and moved it to Earls Court, London's 

premier exhibition centre. 

Inside the specially allocated Leisure Hall 

will be assembled all the leading companies 

from the U.K. and overseas, Showcasing the 

most dynamic and exciting games software 

on the market 

There's simply no better way of getting your 

TAKETHI 



hands on the very latest technology Feel free 
to try the games yourself or to see how the 
experts perform live on the gigantic Pepsi 
video wall at the National Computer Games 
Championship 

There will also be daily Personal Computer 
Conferences covering topics from small 
business to music, to heip you get more from 
your computer, lb obtain more information 
about the conferences please call 
01-948 5166 
So if you think you've given the current batch 



CHALLENGE WrTM 



H 



The Personal Computer Show is presented by Personal Computer World a VN II I 




■ •*•»■ 



E IN ENTERTAINMENT... ENDS HERE 



TEC 






om 



itch 



of games your best shots, come to the 
Persona! Computer Show and discover a new 
world of excitement. 

foattend on the public days [either 16th, 
17thor 18th September) just complete and 
return the coupon with a cheque postal order 
(or £3.00. To make a credit card booking, 
telephone the Keith Prowse Personal 
Computer Show ticket off ice on 
01*7419999 




r 



Post b The Keith Prowse Pefsonal Computer Show. 
Ticket Office. PO Bex 2 London W601Q Tel 01-741 9999 

Please send me try ticket(s) to the Persona f Computer Show 

No of Tickets 

tame, 



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SS«!2r 



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REVIEWS 





After enjoying critical and popular success with FTL 
Games 's O/dsand Dungeon Master^ Mirrorsoft now 
reaches into the past tor the American company's 
backcatalogue to release SunDog It first appeared in 
the UK a couple Of years ago at the £40 mark; Mirrorsoft 
now make it available at virtually budget price tor the ST. 

Resigned 10 spending his life 



working for a pittance in the glass 
mnss, Zed's fortunes change 
when an unknown uncle dies 
leaving him a SunDog Ireighler in 
the inheritance. On collecting the 
Freighter Zed learns that his uncle 
had contracted to build a new 
colony tor the Society of ihe Mew 
Faith For Zed to fulfill this contract 
he must first locate the colony of 
Banville, find, purchase and ship 
ii all the required materials, then 
track down all the cryogenicalFy 
(mien disciples end deliver them 
Iq the colony. 

SunDog begins by showing an 
overhead view of Zed standing in 
the forward section of the 
freighter. To operate the SunDog 
Zed must be guided, by mouse, to 
various positions m the ship where 
screens can be accessed, 
Pressing the led button calls up a 
character status window which 
shows details of Zed's health; the 
wndow also has a compass, 
*atch and a variety of "hold' 
positions. The fatter allow Zed to 
carry objects or, by dragging an 
object onto the correct mark, eat, 
wear or simply carry an object in 
hand- If Zed wants to be armed for 
ptanetside excursions he can walk 
to the ship's Locker and transfer a 
gun into his hand. More 
substantial cargo is held in the Pod 
Locker where two cargo loads and 
ten objects can be stored- 

PIRATES AHOY! 

The SunDog has six engineering 



bays: Warp Drive. Sub-C Engines. 
Guns. Shields. Tactical and 
Pilotage, Each bay is divided mio 
four lines composed of four 
objects, with status indicators to 
show faults The SunDog already 
has some damage which can be 
repaired by purchasing 

replacement parts, or temporarily 
fixed with shunts, Damaged or 
fined parts obviously impair 
performance and consume more 
fuel. Since the Drahew Region 
includes 12 solar systems, 1B 
inhabited planet 3 and 50 Cities, 
fuel efficiency can be crucial. 
For travel Zed stands at the 



pilot's position on the navigation 
screen. Once the ship has lifted oft 
-a dated, purely graphic effect- It 
must be guided, via the Star 
System map to a Warp Point 
where, after the engines have 
charged up, the next system can 
be selected with the Star Map. 
Following another primitive warp 
effect, the SunDog appears in the 
selected system and the Star 
System map Is again used to 
select the ship's destination, and 
show its slow progress to the 
planet - during which time pirates 
may attack 

Under attack the Tactical 
Screen is accessed and shields 
raised. But before battle joins 
pirates threaten, and there's a 
chance to escape by jettisoning 
some cargo Refusal to surrender 
brings on the disappointing action; 
a viewscreen showing a starfield 
against which, using radar, the 
SunDog is manoeuvred lo bring 
the pirate into the cross- sights. 
Pirate ships never get much biyger 
than a dot and the limited 
gameplay strongly resembles that 
i Star Trek games, 

On a planet Zed can explore 



Heeding tot the planet Lightning to explore and trad* tor good* to mid your 
mission, and eventually defrost the dtaelptra 



either on foot, in which case he 
risks being mugged, or in his cargo 
pod vehicle. In either case the 
basic overhead graphics are the 
same: Zed rs guided by placing the 
cross-sight where you wanl him to 
go When he walks into a building 
a window opens to show the 
mtenor. In a bar, for instance. Zed 
can sn down with someone, ask 
lor informal ion or buy or sell 
something. More legitimate 
trading is done at the warehouses 
and. as m EM e, buying goods low 
and Sailing high is crucial to 
keeping your ship running. 

It is a pity thai the underlying 
adventure of strategical trading fa 
loo repetitive to sustain interest, 
especially as the arcade seciion is 
also so primitive. 




ATARI ST 

Diskette; £14,99 

The limited nature of 
p tanetikt e graphics and 
sound are partially 

compensated tor by 

exceptionally brief disk 
access times, which makes 
play relatively fait. With a 
game Of such length it is as 
well that rt may be saved at 
any time, and a library sat up 
to hold as many 1 
as you wtati. 

OVERALL 63% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Mirrorsoft are not planning 
on releasing any 

version^ 



, . . the underlying 
adventure is too 
repetitive to sustain 
interest ..." 



VERSION UPDATE 



CAPTAIN BLOOD 

Inlogrames 



The new Amstrad version is 
surprisingly close to the ST one, 
The graphics are inevitably less 
detailed than on the 16-Oit 
machine, as is the still quite 
respectable Jean-Michel Jarre 
irrtro tune, but the overall 



Amstrad, Diskette: £14.95 

THEbtzarre quest of Captain 
atoodfrewewed TGM007 . Atari ST 
74%}, now continues on the 
Amstrad. You're responsible lor 
finding Blood's five clones and 
destroying them to restore the 
Captain's vital fluids, Locating 
tharn depends on landing via an 
arcade sequence and then 
communicating with the planets' 
aliens with an icon -driven system, 



The ship Interior looks equally as effective as on the ST, in fact the whote game 
19 a great conversion 




atmosphere is portrayed superbly, 
Flying down to the planet is, 
admittedly, slower than, the ST but 
still quite enpyable, and the ability 
to bypass it by pressing Escape is 
a facility even ST owners might 
envy after a d02en or so planets. 

Given that Captain Blood is 
above all an adventure - albeit a 
very pretty one on both ST and 
Amstrad - there's very little 
difference in play ability making 
(his a very commendable 
conversion indeed Surprisingly 
perhaps a tape version is imminent 
for both the Amstrad. and m 
September for the Commodore 64 
with more predictable Amiga and 
PC conversions planned as well. 

AMSTRAD CPC: OVERALL 
76% 



TGM TX 006:7-8851/124 



LOONY 




EARTH LIGHT 

HrafcH 



Pete Cooke, author of Earth Light needs little 
introduction, Tau Ceti t Academy and Micronaut One 
have all been big hits which have pushed the 
Spectrum to new limits, Having moved from CRL to 
Firebird via the now defunct Nexus. Cooke shows no 
sign of having lost his innovative approach to the 
Spectrum, 



A squadron of the Arctuf an Space 
Fleet was on routine mission. 
collecting mtergaiactic garbage 
for zumtum reprocessing . when an 
•neon sequential blue/green planet 
caught its attention. Despite the 
primitive nature of the planet's 
civilisation, the fleet's Commander 
fefl i| was suitable lor joining the 
Arcturan Federation of Lesser 
Beings. However as the fleet 
approached the planet it suddenly 
came under attack from a strange 
force based on the planet's moon. 
One by one the fleet's ships were 
dragged down and smashed on 
the harsh lunar landscape. Some 
planets, rt seams, are so paranoid 
they just have no sense of 
hospitality . . . 

Yet miraculously one lonely, and 
very average Arcturan survived. 
His name was Slaatn and before 
he could be as mercilessly 



murdered as the rest of his 
iiraoee . he managed to steal an 
alien ship To escape from the 
moon he must disable all the force 
field general ors, These box- 
shaped objects are scattered over 
four levels., each with eight zones 
to be played in any order to 
complete the level. 

At the start of each zone mission 
there's an opportunity to 
rebalance your paytoad of fuel, 
shield power and missiles - 
increasing one automatically 
decreases the others. This can be 
very important because in some 
zones there's a lot of boxes and 
few robots, making fuel crucial, 
while In others missiles and shields 
are vital There's no way of telling 
pnor to starting a zone what rt is 
like, but zones can be aborted at 
any time, losing onty the point 
score for that zone and not the 



game as a whole This ability 
obviously makes deaths easier to 
avoid, but the game remains very 
tough since each zone si til must 
be played to the finish without loss 
Of life - which resets the zone. 



LETHAL 



When the mission begins, the ship 
rests on a launch plinth and 
pressing up causes N to rotate as 
if unscrewing before coming under 
control. After all the boxes have 
been collected, the ship returns to 
its plinth to complele the level - or 
before then merely receive 
information on the number of 
bones and robots remaining in the 
zone. Unfortunately the tricky 
nature of docking, and especially 
the second or so H takes to rotate 
down can make the ship unduly 
vulnerable to enemy attack , 

Each zone's landscape, 
illuminated by the earth rotating 
above, recedes in convincing 3-0 
to a not -too distant horizon. Four 
horizontal grid lines usually (not all 
zones have them) provide helpful 
points of reference as the saucer- 
like ship moves into the distance. 
Shrinking as rt does so, The grid- 
lines are particularly useful for 
judging the position of various 
tree-like structures and fatally 



$ts*tn bounce* off a piece of aewwy m ton att»*T>pt to find mil tn* gravity bourn* foemtmd on itw moon 



Fuel 



Shield IE 



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spikey rock mounds, though the 
latter can be flown over simply by 
increasing height. 

More active opposition to your 
quest is provided by various 
robots. The dumber ones simply 
move into and out of the 
landscape, like moving gates, 
while slightly more intelligent 
robots guard boxes by rotating 
around them. The most lethal 
robots are the homing kamikaze 
type which have to be shot. Most 
robots automatically aiier height to 
attack your ship. Collisions cause 
the ship to spin to the ground and 
lose shield power, but while 
spinning the ship can still be hit by 
other robots - both frustrating and 
fatal. When the shield is exhausted 
a life is lost and alt boxes collected 
in the zone are returned to the* 
original positions. 



SPECTRUM 48/ 
128 

Cassette; £7.95 

Graphically ,i>-" Light ii 
good, with superb parallax 
scrolling effecting even the 
shadows. In play the 
g r a phi te can't quite conceal 
a slight repetrtiveness of 
action; even wtth superb 3-0 
shooting, a few aliens and 
collecting boxes rant superb 
arcade action. Nevertheless 
played as a whole, wtth Uvea 
vital for any hope of 
completing tha entire game, 
"' Light is a compelling 
challenge. If not quite in the 
class. Far 128 
owners there's the added 
bonus of a tune by Vivaldi and 
some good sound FX. 

OVERALL 81% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Pate Cooke's big arcade 
games hnve all been 
converted for most popular 
formats, and we expect this 
to be the same, however, 
there's no news of other 
formats yiyt 



"... a compelling 

challenge, If not 

quite In the Tau Ceti 

class." 



52 124TGM TX 008:7-88 



REVIEWS 





BLOOD BROTHERS 

Gremlin Graphics 



One of the designers and chief programmers of Blood 
Brothers is Steve Marsden. who previously wrote 
the well- received The Final Matrix released by 
Gremlin about this time last year. His latest game 
follows in the footsteps of many that have attempted to 
add value by joining several game-styles together. 
The planet Syloma is a peaceful 



planet naturally vulnerable to the 
attentions of intergaiacbc space 
convicts such as the Scorpions. 
Dumg a long summery day when 
the brothers Hark and Kf en were 
testing their new Skywalk Jet 
EBtes the Scorpions pajd Sytonsa 
a visit. HgLfk and Kren returned 
home to find it irt ruins and their 
parents dead, After burying their 
parents the two 18-year -olds 
swore a blood oath to earn 
vengeance, and set about 
adapting their Bikes tor the battle 
to tome. When every last weapon 
and device had been built i nto their 
bihes they set off in search of the 
evil Scorpions , . . 

The btood brothers evemualry 
trade the convicts down to a 
mining planet. The game begins 
with the two brothers standing at 
the entrance to the first of 
numerous mines on the planet 
Scorpia if both are sent into the 
first mine, one player can use keys 
to control Hark and another uses 
the joystick few Kren. This isn't 
reaSy recommended, however, 
because if one player goes off- 
screen he is frozen until the other 
player joins him. In addition 



players can shoot one another, 
bouncing them off screen as easily 
as contact with the mines' aliens. 
The best strategy is undoubtedly 
for the brothers to tackle mines 
separately - pressing a key 
switches between the two. 

DROWNING SLOWLY 

The objective of Stood Brothers is 
to collect all the gems in each mine 
and destroy any matter 
generators. An additional task is 
collection of stores to replenish 
weapons and fuel tanks of Jet 
Bikes and the Jet Packs used to 
manoeuvre in the mines, AJien 
creatures attempt to kill the 
brothers by bouncing them 
around, and Should one of them 
touch the rippling water a lethal 
undertow quickly disposes of him. 
(Since each character has only one 
irfe it can be irritating watching him 
slowly being drowned.) Creatures 
can be killed rf shot five times , but 
care has to be taken over the gun's 
recoil. When all the gems have 
been taken from a mine the 
brothers can fly onto the next one, 




Slowty, but cofourtulty /ethiking to 3 mine. 
Amstrad scrum 



1 the hops of b&commg rten — 



Standing on separate platforms 
al the mine entrance the brothers 
can choose to go to different 
mines, or by standing togelher to 
the same one. The Jet Bike section 
has you guiding your character 
through a city of blocks , only a few 
of which can be shot away. At the 
city's end stands the entrance to 
the next mine. If the bike crashes, 
you are sent back to the last mine 
entrance where you choose 
between going bach into the mine 
- for Jet 8ike fuel perhaps - or 
making another attempt at getting 
to the next mine. 

On both Amstrad and Spectrum 
the game is divided into three 
different modules and once the 
main program has loaded you can 
choose which of these three to 
play and toad si . Gameplay doesn ' t 
vary overmuch, though, and the 
general impression is one of two 
dated game-styles bolted 
together with only limited 
imagination- 



AMSTRAD CPC 

Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette: £14.99 

The Amstrad has a nice tune 
and some professional 
graphics, but the Jet Bike 
sequence is a touch sluggish 
while the mine sections are 
limited and unoriginal. A 
tough, but average game. 

OVERALL 59% 



Owp m the mines ot Scorpia, a*mmhing tot tha 



haarify guarded diamond* - Spectrum acraan 




SPECTRUM 48/120 

Cassette: £7.99 
Diskette: £12.99 

The Spectrum has a 
marginally faster Jet Bike 
section, and a rather garish 
mine section, but in terms of 
playabilrty is virtually 

identical. On the 48K there 
are reasonable spot FX. 
while the 12SK has a good 
tune - although the game 
modules are still individually 
loaded. 

OVERALL 58% 



OTHER FORMATS 

A Commodore 04 version Is 
due for imminent release, 
dtsfc: £14,99, cassette: £9,99, 



ii 



, the general 
impression Is one of 
two dated game- 
styles bolted 
together . 



it 



i 



TGM TX 008:7-6653/124 



REVIEWS 



RETURN OF JIMBO 



INFILTRATOR II 

US Gold 



Chris Gray is perhaps best known for writing the 
hugely successful Bautderdash game which led to an 
entire series of sequels, The original infiltrator was 
released in 1986 to some critical success, and two 
years later the sequel has finally appeared with the original 
included free. 

It's only months since Johnny 
'Jirnbo-Saby' McGibbits 

infiltrated the Mad Leader's 
miliary installation and saved 
humanity, yet already the mighty 
deed seems forgotten, it is almost 
with relief, then, that Jimbo finds 
out the Mad Leader has 
reorganised his forces and once 
more threatens this ungrateful 
world. 

Unlike trie earlier game there 
are th ree mi ssions to accomplish , 
all basically composed of the 
same three distinct sections: flying 
to the base, infiltration and flying 
home, The first section was 
exceptionally difficult in the 
original, so it's a relief to find it a 
little easier in the sequel - and can 
even be bypassed altogether, 

The (light section is presented 
from a cockpit pant -of -view with 
plenty of dials and warning lights 
to watch while flying toward the 
enemy base, Once airborne and 
having programmed the ADF 
(Automatic Direction Finder) the 
main danger is Other aircraft, 
These can either be friends, 
psychopaths or enemies, if you 
see the enemy earfy enough you 
can ask him for his ID and respond 
with either an allied or enemy 
codeword, if he asks for your 10 
first you must guess at his identity. 
Psycho pilots cannot be stopped 



range gas grenades, a mine 
detector, false papers and several 
items for later missions. With his 
papers in hand Jimbo can enter 
the base (divided into nine 
screensj and enter the buildings - 
though if a guard asks for his 
papers he must quickly obey or 
risk setting oh the alarm. 

Inside the game switches to a 
Spy vs Spy 3-D view of the room. 
An on-screen map shows moms 




a little repetitive. 

When Jimbo has completed his 
mission in the enemy base he 
escapes in the helicopter 
Fortunately you can lose as marry 
lives as you like on this section 
and still complete the game. 



RMdy for takm-oftin ittm net*, improved Gtimo DMX-2 Attack chopper 



by any ID. Dunng combat cannon. 
guns, chaff and hares are available 
to the pilot but manoeuvrability is 
limited. When you arrive at the 
base you can land and the next 
section is loaded from disk. 

UNALARMED 

In the ground section the view is 
trom overhead with Jimbo 
Standing just outside his 
helicopter. He carries with him 
shod -fange sleeping gas. longer- 



Jimbo has explored and which 
ones might be crucial to him 
completing the mission, Whizzing 
through these rooms, it can be 
tempting not to show your ID and 
just use gas grenades, but when 
the alarm goes the enemy pounce 
as soon as you enter the room and 
sometimes there's no time to 
respond- Keys can be found to 
turn off the alarm and a change ef 
uniform stops the guards asking 
for your ID, but the section is still 



COMMODORE 64/128 
Diskette: £14.99 

Gamoplay and graphics 
remain virtually 

indistinguishable from the 
original, so including it ia a 
little ironic. Without the 
incredible hardness of the 
first section, the underlying 
game's limitations become 
much more apparent and 
make this a dubious release. 
A cassette version will be 
available at C9.99 - due to 
lack of disk-accessing 
during sections - which 
happens in inMiraior l - the 
sequel should make for a 
friendlier multiload. 

OVERALL 58% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Nothing Other machine 
versions are planned. 



11 . . . indistinguish- 
able from the origi- 
nal, the game's limi- 
tations make this a 
dubious release,'* 



VERSION UPDATE 



GUTZ 

OCEAN 



SPECTRUM Cassette: £7.95 Diskette: £14.95 



REVIEWED on the 

Commodore 64 in TGMOOB, the 
Spectrum version of Gutz is 
programmed by Jimmy Bag ley. 
with graphics by Chas Oavies 
The inspiration for Gutz came 
when Special FK's graphic artist, 
Andy Rixon had a medical check- 
up which resulted in some very 
pretty pictures of his own guts 
being revealed 1 

Gutz is set in the internal organs 
of a space monster which has 
swallowed you whole Gutted, to 
say the least, you decide on an 
escape, and the alien's mouth 
seems the best place to aim for. 

The four levels are split into 
three regions. Connected by 
artenai tunnels. To get oui. you 
need to run through each section 
of the alien body, collecting parts 



of a Super Weapon required to 
defeat the alien's end-of-level 
major organs. More powerful 
weapons can be collected en 
route to defeat I he parasites and 
germs infesting the body. A map 
can be used to work your way 
round each level and helmets 
provide extra ehleids- 

The monochrome screen of 
Gufz adds to the atmosphere of 
being within the dark caverns of an 
alien lifeform. The wails of the alien 
msides are reasonably effective, 
although end-of-level organs are 
graphics more in the style of 
medical views than that oi the gory 
Alien Syndrome. The lune playing 
throughout is really sound effects 
strung together to form a Sort of 
music. 

The etghl-dirediOnal scrolling is 




smooth, although it's easy to get 
Stuck 1 timing comers and in 
narrow corridors, making 
parasites almost impossible to 
avoid. The gameplay is enjoyable 
but repetitive after a while, mainry 
because each level is the same m 
style. This together with the 



combination of a loo-large main 
character, narrow passages and 
tiny bullets fired by parasites 
makes it a difficult game in which 
skill takes a backseat io kick. 

SPECTRUM 48/128: 
OVERALL 70% 



54/124TGM TX 008:7-88 




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JASON AND THE 
AAARGHiNAUTS 



AAARGH! 

Melbourne House 



The number of Amiga coin-ops being translated to 
home computers now seems to rival original releases. 
AaargM was one of the first three Arcadia coin-ops 
and earned praise as very much the best. 
Unfortunately the two-ptayer mode has been lost in an 
otherwise superb conversion. 



The island ot Darance is a quiet. 
idyi«c place which seems very 
much tost in time with Pyramids. 
Greek statue* end Wild West tone 
pe a cef u lly coexisting on its 
shores. Such a gentle people are 
dearty ill-prepared for the horrors 
0* two 20-foOl-high monsters Out 
wreak to vengeance on them lor 
their continual, if unknowing 
expansion into the monsters" 
territory. 

When the Ogre monster, bom in 
the island's north, was irttte none 
of the other monster children 
would play with n This may 



young ladies for breakfast 
Breathing fire, the Dragon sets off 
to claim the egg for itserf. On its 
way it peases through 1 z different 
cities (each loaded separately 
from disk), most of which contain 
a normal Roc's egg. The eggs can 
be collected, but before storing 
them m its treasure cave, the 
Dragon must first fight the other 
monster. 



DRAG ON AN OGRE 

This hand-to-claw contest is a fast 




77i» mnd-ot-Q*mm sc/**n - pwfup 



to play either Dragon or Ogre, 
although their capabilities are 
virtually identical. Both can lose 
firepower after extravagant use 
and restore <t by picking up 
lightning bolts revealed by 
demolishing buikJings. Also 
concealed m the buildings is food 
to restore health, the state of this 
is indicated by the extent of the 




TTt# Uiant eggs Qgr* on but n»'s obwoi. 



possibly have been doe to its 
severe halrtosts which set fire to 
am/thing nearby, but whatever the 
reason, the Ogre is now out to 
claim the island's fabulous golden 
egg with as much casual carnage 
along the way as possible. 

News of the Ogre's ambrtton 
natur&fty infuriates that other 
antisocial island creature: the 
Dragon It too has been 
unjustifiably discriminated against 
because of a passing interest in 



and furious sub-game which 
doesn't affect the monster's 
health m the overall game. When 
rive eggs have been collected the 
monster can go on to the volcano 
screen wherein is hidden the 
golden egg. If this is taken, the 
search continues for yet another 
golden egg. Should a City not have 
an egg then the monster must bum 
or putvense every building on the 
screen to access the next level, 
At the game's start you choose 



Aaarghi' title wntien above a 
monster's head; when complete 
the monster dies m a spectacularly 
bloody fashion. 

The only defence the humans 
have is a, primitive catapult which 
they wheel around the crty, This 
can be destroyed with a few well- 
aimed punches, but a mere 
persistent threat comes from the 
island's giant flies and their lethal 
stings. On later levers the Wee are 
joined by enormous hornets, flying 
lizards which spit fire and birds 
that come swooping out of the 
distance, if you win all the monster 
contests. however, these 
creatures can usually be avoided 



AMIGA 

Diskette: £19.99 

Graphically Aeerghf >s 
excellent, with all 12 cities 
being finely detailed and 
making good use of the 
Amiga's colours. Monster 
animation la fauttiess and 
particularly Impressive in the 
big har>d-to-claw contest, all 
of which Is accompanied by 
superb sound FX and a 
reasonable tune. Rut 
urrf ortunatety the game is far 
too easy once the monster 
contest has been mastered 
end without a two-player 
option soon becomes 
repetitive. 

OVERALL 65% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for the Commodore 64 (Cv9w cassette}, 
Apple II OS end IBM (both £24.95 on disk). 



<t 



animation is faultless, but the gan 
is far too easy . • • M 



56 



JU 



0:7-88 



REVIEWS 



PRISONER CELL 
BLOCK OUCH 



STIR CRAZY 

fnfogfaroes 



The star of Stir Crazy, Bobo, is famous in France for 
appearing in his very own cartoon strip. The writing of 
a game to express Bobo's unique humour has been 
undertaken by the same team who progr ammed the 
offbeat adventure Sidewalk. 



For crimes unknown Bobo has 
spent the last 17 years 
'INZEESLAMMEFT. His highest 
ambrtKxi is clea/ty to escape from 
tne place and its drab chores, but 
knowing Bobo it's unlikely he'll 
achieve anything other than 
**>ng a tew more years to his 
sentence The excellent 

introductory screen, which shows 
Bobo dancing in the light of the 
prison searchlight, sets the 
standard for the graphics to come 
Sir CfiZy >s a collection of Six 
games - played individually Or 



together - none of which have an 
end. the intention is to score 
maximum points. Each game has 
its own high score table, saved to 
dish, as well as an overall high 
score table . As many as six players 
can play in turn 

The first game »s rapper-style as 
Bobo rushes to teed six prisoners 
m the canteen. There seems no 
end to their second helpings and 
should Bobo fall behind, one of the 
voracious prisoners crowns him 
with the soup container. Game 
Two has Bobo peeling spuds. 




down picks one up and Joystick 
waggling strips off the skin before 
Bobo tosses the potato over his 
shoulder - if the potato isn't 
properly done it's thrown back. 
There are bonus points tor 
finishing a pile of potatoes, but no 
time to for self-congratulation as 
more come piling down the chute 
before eventually burying our 
unlucky inmate, 

GOING TO POT 

Bobo's next chore involves 
washing a clean floor . which might 
seem easy until doors start 
opening to let in prison guards and 
dogs who have just been strolling 
in the countryside. Bobo can stop 
Srty Of them entering it he runs to 
ihe door m time and forces them 
backwards by standing in front of 
I hem. To earn bonus points, he 
has to mop the floor so that the 
warden will be pleased when he 
looks m. 

Bobo's task in (he mass prison 
escape section is to run left and 
nght with a trampoline. Rather 
bizarraly the prisoners feel happier 
if they get to bounce on the 
trampoline several times before 
they go over the wall, so the more 
times they bounce the more bonus 
points. 

Miraculously Bobo manages to 
escape, but lo complete his dash 
for freedom runs along electrical 
wires. Periodically, sparks come 
speeding down the wires forcing 
Bobo to )ump between the three 



cables to avoKf being 
electrocuted If he collects the 
green cylinders he receives a 
bonus - something which gets 
harder as the game speeds up 

The final game takes place 
dormitory where Bobo struggles 
10 sleep after being recaptured. 
The other five prisoners are 
happily slumbering, but their 
snores disturb him, so he dashes 
from one to another - avoiding the 
Chamberpot - nudging them into 
silence. Only with somnabuiarrt 
silence can Bobo briefly return to 
his bad and earn some points 



ATARI ST 
Diskette: £19.95 

The graphics are bold and 
colourful, sometimes too 
much so - making It hard to 
spot when prisoners ere 
demanding feed for 
Instance. The accompanying 
tune is suitably offbeat and 
overall presentation i* nut, 
Gamoplay Is adequate to 
good, though the inability to 
finish games makes Ihem 
individually limited. The best 
way to play StU Crazy It with 
friends. 

OVERALL 61% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions for the PC and 
Amiga are due for release 
Shortly. 



"The excellent introductory screen sets the 
standard for the graphics to come." 



Makifyotm*alototmmona. Bobo 
ootno pomdgm - ST screen 



porridge to his fellow in-mates, also 



VERSION UPDATE 



MASTERS OF THE 
UNIVERSE: THE MOVIE 

Uipmlm GcapT' 



Atari ST: E1 9.99 

THE the third game to carry the 
Masters Of The Universe title and 
the first lo appear on the ST. 
Gremlm gameplay remains close 
to that of the B-bil versions. He- 
Man's quest is to recover the eight 
chords - tost in present-day 
America - which together will 
activate the Cosmic Key and 
fetum Him to Castle Greyskulie 
Unfortunately some of the chords 
are held by Skeletons force, only 
by defeating them can the Key be 



activated 

The game is divided into four 
sections, linked by an overhead 
view of acify infested by Skefetor's 
sokliers. 

Section one - the scrapyard - 
He-Man faces three of Skeletons 
impressively detailed minions - 
one after the other - In unarmed 
Combat Graphically incorporating 
some nice touches, this section 
has limited combat moves and t he 
responsiveness is sluggish, 
making for dreary gameplay, 




it's not «/• to walk tttm ■trawl* - 
disregarding (fie danger, H»-n»#n 
ntndw* onward to tho mcrspyard - ST 

o wn in g , victory, it's on to 
Charlie's Shootout where He-Man 
covers a shopfranl with his cross- 
sigh! and aims to hill enemy 
soldiers before they do unto him. 
Graphically nice, the number of 
soldiers makes it difficult to 
complete 



The next section lakes oh from 
the Store rooftop with He- Man on 
a Hying disk indulged in a midair 
battle with more of Skeletons 
henchmen. Stage Four is the final 
confrontation" where the muscle- 
bound marvel struggles to keep 
his balance on a throne dais while 
simultaneously seeking to throw 
Skeleior into the abyss, 

Benn Daglish intro tunes and 
r ea sonab le spot RC contribute to 
the good presentation- it's 
unfortunate the basic game 
structure is so poor - ml 
around streets is bonng and Ihe 
good graphics m the main combat 
sections fart to disguise poor 
gameplay. Without any radical 
game redesign, Masters Of The 
Universe is a conversion that 
would have been best left undone. 

ATARI ST: 52% 



TGM TX 008:7-8857/124 



REVIEWS 



THE WHOLE WORLD 
IN HIS HANDS 



THE ARMAGEDDON MAN 



Mariech 



he Armageddon Man was originally released on the 

T 8-bit machines late last year, and now makes a 1 6* bit 
debut first on the Amiga; ST and PC versions to follow 
soon. Authors, Electronic Pencil Company 
previously wrote 8-bit versions of the big hits Zoids 
(Mariech) and The Fourth Protocol (Century Hutchinson.) 



The near Mure is the setting for 
The Armageddon Man, a future in 
which many o' Earth's nations 



requests from superpowers; 
requests require decisions: 
disagreeing, agreeing or taking a 



technological and agricultural 
status. Missile, technology and 
food mountains have to be 
eliminated by redirecting 
resources to poorer alliances - 
which commands are issued 
through the Out-Tray icon Hare 
letters of support are sent lo 
Countries adhering to Orders, while 
rebellious nations can be 
reprimanded or a special UNN 
force seni to provide military 
influence end effectively bully the 
stubborn alliance into action, 
Hostile alliances can be ordered to 
improve their international 
relations, but often ignore your 
threats if they have low regard for 
your confidence 




TT* Mfrtftt* mmntpulstton scf**n from which you control orbttmv tf9v*c*s to *py on potential troubi* spots, Thm est 
toofcj on wnti intvrwii - patrt tot thought - Amtga *ira*rt 



have formed powerful alliances 
and become superpowers, each 
with the capacity to start nuclear 
wars, 

With 16 superpowers, there is 
no konger trust to keep the peace, 
in desperation, the superpowers 
form a single powerbloc - the UNN 
(United Nuclear Nat ions) -through 
which political, military and 
economic actions of each nation 
win be directly controlled by a 
single leader, the Supreme 
Commander, the Armageddon 
Man . . . you. 

Your secondary objective is to 
ensure the worid radiation level 
does not rise to lethal levels 
through nuclear explosions. 

In the UNN command centre, a 
world map shows the global 
alliances. Five icons are used to 
issue orders and display data on 
the state of each alliance. The (n- 
Tray icon holds messages and 



neutral stance over the issue in 
question. Whatever the decision. 
it will almost certainly have a 
double -edged-sword effect. Often 
a compromise is all thai preserves 
a fragile peace. 

The Satellite icon controls 
positioning of reconnarsance 
satellites for spying on potentially 
warring nations and SOI satellites. 
which can be positioned between 
alliances likely to start a nuclear 
war following an escalation using 
conventional weapons. SOI 
satellites aren't entirely effective, 
bui positioned correct ly, they can 
save millions of lives and keep 
down the world radiation level. 



FLEXING MILITARY 
MUSCLE 

The Information icon provides 
data on each alliance's military. 



A terrorist group is located 
withm one of the alliances. 
randomly chosen at the start ot the 
game. It aims to destroy I he UNN 
and the international relations 
between alliances You can 
counter by sending aniiterrorist 
squads into suspect countries, out 
failing to lind evidence dents your 
reputation as a leader And it's 
wise to be right, because the fickle 
alliances can call a vote of 



confidence at any time- Fail ihe 
vote and your game is over, 
succeed and you're back m 
power. Countries often cai for a 
vote if they feel you aren't up to the 
task of leadership. 

The fifth icon - Radio - is used 
(o intercept radio messages 
between countries which may 
provide warning of future conflicts. 
All wavelengths are unknown at 
the game's start, so a frequency 
scan is often needed to locate 
messages and then they need 
unscrambling if radio filters are 
used. 

A map and alliance sticker flags 
are supplied with the game to keep 
track of the many complex inter- 
alliance relations. A useful extra 
which eliminates the need for pen 
and paper. 

7?w ArmapeddOfi Man tries to 
strike a balance between 
extremely complex strategy and 
introductory play and works well. 
A shame, then, that there is a lack 
of credibility. The alliances formed 
are realistic, but the way they 
operate isn't', and in play it's often 
difficult to determine an alliance's 
political stance over certain 
issues. At times it's more luck than 
skill that's involved m making the 
nght decision. Countries attack 
each other with little provocation 
and others form the most unusual 
alliances, {the Eastern Block 
formed an alliance with America in 
one particular game). All this 
makes The Armageddon Man 
unsatisfying to play 



AMIGA 

Diskette: £19,99 

Good use of the sound chip, 
with ominous music playing 
when a war starts and a 
triumphant fanfare when 
you're given the vote of 
confidence. The graphics art 
• great improvement on 8-b*t 
versions, although some 
extras are a Irttk* irrelevant 
(such as the cat.) Shame the 
strategy is as unpredictable 
as the 8-btt game. Full 
RAMLOAD and RAMSAVE 
game position options are 
given along with a final Quit 
game option, 

OVERALL 54% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Also available soon lor Atari ST, 
all disks priced at £ 1 9.99 



IBM PC and the Amstrad PCW; 



" . . . It's more luck than skill that's 
involved in making the right decision." 



58 124TGM IX 008:7-88 



X *£JL 



LIGHT WARS 



RESCUE MISSION 

Saga 



Rescue Mission is the third title to use the Light Phaser 
Gun, like the 3-D Glasses the software support for 
this peripheral has been on the scarce side. While the 
3-D Glasses haven't been completely successful as 
a console extra (see the review of Blade Eagle in TGM007). 
the Light Phaser uses a much simpler method of operation 
and. as such, makes for generally better games. 



it's jungle warfare yet again on the 
Saga but the time you're on the 
defensive, this still means having 
lo slaughter enemy soldiers by the 
hundreds, A big offensive by your 
forces has left allied soldiers 
wounded and behind enemy lines. 
Central Command has decreed 
that you, the sharpest shooter in 
the army, should provide sniper 
cover while the medics go in to 
patch up your wounded 
comrades, 

Three medics go in, one St a 
time, on one of the most advanced 
of modem military vehicles ... a 
rickety handcart. They crank the 
handcart along, stopping at each 
wounded tidier to patch him up 
before moving on to the next 
injured man. The enemy frown on 
this rescue attempt and, armed 
with grenades, bazookas, missile 
launchers, bombs and other 
weaponry, try and prevent the 
medic getting through. 

Direct hits are usually fatal 
although near-miss explosions. 



hits by bullets, tear gas or 
boomerang hits just slow down the 
handcart You , too, can hit a medic 
with the Light Phaser's bullets ii 
you're not careful, though he only 
falls unconscious unfit the stars 
floating around his head are shot. 
Mines along the track also have to 
be destroyed otherwise the 
handcart gets blown off the tracks 
and the medic killed, whereupon 
the nejd medic continues the 
journey from the start of the zone. 






MIKE STEVE AND JOHN 

The medics have their own good 
and bad points: the first. Mike, is 




Keeping on (A* fight tracks In orrier 
to r0ic u* com fed** mnd Mm 
yourself it m+d*i 

slow but steady, Steve is 8 fast 
healer of wounds but lazy and has 
to rest frequently and John is Ihe 
best ail- rounder, but he's the last 
man and. i1 lost, it's game over. 

Healed soldiers leave behind a 
special Hem providing protection 
against a different enemy weapon. 
Collecting the first-aid kit has a 
double effect, healing the medic I 
he has been wounded and acting 
as a smart bomb if he hasn't. If a 
friendly soldier is shot - they can 
be recognised by the white flags 
they wave - any collected items 
are lost. 

if the medic makes it safety 
through to the end of the track, 
points are awarded based on the 
number of enemy soldiers shot 
and allied soldiers successfully 
treated. The game continues over 
five levels, from jungle, swamp, 
village and bridge through to the 
final ammunition depot. 

Like most Sega games. Rescue 
Mission is immediately playable. 
The action is continuous and each 
level is as enjoyable to play m itseff 
as ihe game is as a whole. 



SEGA 

Mega Cartridge: £19.96 

Like the other Light Pha&or 
game Shootng. Gallery, quick 
eye and trtggerfinger 
coordination is essential. 
The hit radius around each 
soldier is pretty large so you 
don't have to be very 
accurate in aim, as ■ result 
the game is a little too easy (it 
didn't take more than a 
couple of hours play to 
complete when it arrived in 
THE GAMES MACHINE 
office. ) Unlike the average 
Blade Eagle, the game 
actually uses me hardware 
ffs intended for and hasn't 
just been quickly cobbled 
together. 

OVERALL 74% 



■ 



M 



. each level Is 
as enjoyable to play 
In Itself as the game 
is as a whole. 



VERSION UPDATE 



ALIEN SYNDROME 

Ace 



Commodore $4/128: Cassette 
£9.99, Diskette £11.99 
Atari ST: £ 19.99 

SEGA's console version of the 

alien -bashing Gaufiftef-variani 
corn-op was reviewed in TGM004. 
although Ace, The Edge's sister 
label, have the licence to produce 
the home computer conversions, 
Ace are also translating other coin- 
ops including the Taito hits Soldier 
Of (jghf and Oarius (conversions 
ol the latter title should be 
interesting considering the COin- 
op uses three screens placed 
together side by side to display the 
acton.) 

Aliens have captured your 
comrades and are now holding 
them captive in seven spaceships. 
They need rescuing of course and 
two future fighters, Ricky and Mary 



are sent in recover them before a 
time bomb on each ship explodes. 
The game follows the Gauntlet 
Style with the player (or players) 
shown from a bird's-eye- view 
running around the spaceships, 
collecting extra weapons and 
releasing the hostages from their 
captivity. 

Additional weapons can be 
found and a map accessed to 
display the local ion of the 
hostages and the ship layout. 
Once all the hostages are rescued, 
the fighters can go to the exil 
where a mother alien bars 



progress to the nexl level unless 
killed. Each level has its own 
different style of alien and mother 
alien, all ol which are represented 
m disgustingly gory and slimy 
graphics as befits the coin-op 

While the Sega console game 
was unfaithful to the original com 
op by resorting to flipscreen and 
alternating player action, the 
Commodore 64 game uses the 
coin-op's push-scrolling and two- 
player simultaneous action. The 
push -scroll isn't particularly 
friendly as the player needs to 
move perilously close to the edge 
of the screen before it works - as 
a result, any aliens that do appear 
are very difficult to avoid. 

Graphically and sonically, the 
game is excellent, the music is 
quality at work and the graphics 



The slightly jerky horizontal scrolling is hot noticed when you're ijt to your 
n*c* m aliens - A r*ri ST vcresn 




have much of the gore and slime 
that made ihe corn-op such a 
disgustingly great game to play. 
The murtiioad is always a pain, but 
each level is varied both in 
graphics and layout and the pace 
is so fast you're never bored. 

This one beats Gaunrief and 
other games of its ilk hands down. 
Weil done Ace> 

On the ST Ihe scrolling is vary 
smooth when moving vertically 
but only reasonable in the 
horuontai piane Fortunately, this 
■s not loo noticeable during play 
and m both one- and two-player 
mode the action moves along 
smoothly and with pace 
Movement along chasm -spanning 
bridges requires precise 

positioning, it's all too easy to tall 
off in the heal of baitte - a minor 
yet frustrating problem An extra 
for I his version only, is the 
protective dro»d which, when 
collected, acts as a rearguard. 
Alten Syndrome is high in graphic 
detail and makes excellent use of 
colour and animation, Tahir 
Rashid (responsible for Ihe 
graphics) has gone a long way 
toward capturing the atmosphere 
and stomach-churning gore of the 
coin-op. 

COMMODORE 64/1 28: 

OVERALL 89% 

ATARI ST: OVERALL 92% 



TGM TX 008:7-8859/124 




NOW 
TAKEN 



Dept VG, Castle House 

11 Newcastle Street 

Burslem 

Stoke-on-Trent 

ST6 3QB 

Tel: 0782 575043 



SPECTRUM SPECIAL 



Targel Renegade 530 

Mft Warriors 530 

We Iff ft* CftarnpHfi* 7.25 
ID Grant Games Vol £ 7.25 
ftotttg Thunder UO 

Cybefflad 530 

Black Lamp .. 550 

. 550 

~~.H1,. sx 

630 

toU ML Grand Pm 7-50 

7 ..., 7M 

&» 
. fW 
Onn Dart i 5.50 

Worn WBT 1 

Mm 

OvyCn 

Sorcerer Lord 9.50 

Napoleon at War ISO 

• SMShHrts BW 

tThrtlUUM I,, i I, i, I, 6-50 

A TettteeJ ffcjMBf 6-99 

6 .50 



630 
650 
699 



wortoOass Leader Board 

HI 
mpo u ttt Mason ■ 600 
Aran forte I 650 

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* - *TOCUAR* * * 

199 
3 99 
299 

239 

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1,99 



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DunoBon Mtatar 

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ipacenamBi ... 



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-1335 



1^1 . — _ . .. ^ 
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At Bade 

Hurt tor Red OctoMr 15.96 
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Screaming Wings <w*tri speectij 
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725 

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699 

339 
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Why go elsewhere? 

We stock most games on all formats. 
Telephone for games not listed. All games are sent 1 st class, 

most by return of post. 
Castle Computers, the competent mail-order firm that cares 

about its customers! 



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930 
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PacLanrJ 13.93 

FwBoy , 699 

Leviathan .,.,,. 1333 

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•UMITCDQUAAITTR. PA Pis tree on aifxOm over 



60 124TGM TX 008:7-88 



REVIEWS 



SPITTING 

DREAMBUBBLES 



THE GREAT GIANA SISTERS 



Originally a very popular Rainbow Arts release in West 
Germany, this Time Warp production has now been 
picked up for UK distribution by GO!. Programming is 
by Thomas Hertzler on the Amiga and Armin 
Gessert Treoz on the Commodore 64/1 28 with graphics 

by Manfred Trenz 

Gtana was just a normal little 



frf ulan dozing in her bed in Milano 
(an EEC game, see . . . J when her 
dreams took an unexpected turn. 
Transported into a strangely 
wonderful dreamworld of 
horizontally scrolling platforms. 
She found herself struggling to 
survive the attacks of grumpy 
owls, disembodied eyes and 



headbutts a special star-brick, a 
fire wheel is released which 
transforms her into a fearsome 
punhette. In this guise Giana 
destroys normal 1 brick sections 
and uncovers special ones which 
yield bonus diamonds, Wore 
diamonds can be collected by 
lumping at those floating in the sky 
and headbutting star-bricks; if a 



CoOecbng ttta diamonds is but a pipe-dream away - Amiga screen 




vicious wasps. 

Fortunately Giana can crush 
moat of these monsters by 
jumping on them, and It she 



hundred diamond bonuses are 
collected . an extra We is awarded. 
Other objects, collected from 
star- panels. give Giana 



S a arc h mg underground takes more than tunnel vt&on -Amiga screen 




thoughltul addition lo this Super 
Mano Brothers-type game. If two 
players wish to compete they can 
take turns controlling Giana and 
her sister Maria. 




dreambubbles to, uhm, spri at the 
enemy, bouncing dreambubbles 
and homing dreambubbles. in 
addition there are special feature- 
objecls such as clocks (put the 
creatures to sleep), smart bombs 
and water drops (protection 
against fire) which are activated by 
pressing the space bar. 

Each of the game's 32 levels has 
a time limit of 100 seconds and 
should Giana fight her way through 
the monsters, successfully ieaping 
all the hazardous pits and deadly 
pools of water, a points bonus is 
awarded for the amount of time 

remaining If (irne runs out, a life IS 

lost - along with all Giana s 
dreamweapons Not all the prls are 
fatal, however, some lead down to 
caves packed with diamonds and 
only experience shows where 
these caves are. Another hidden 
feature is the presence of invisible 
blocks which if headbutted warp 
Giana several levels forward. 

On both the Amiga and C64 disk 
version there is an all-time high 
score table and 'Today's 
Greatest' version which is a 



COMMODORE 64/128 
Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette: £11.99 

The Commodore game 
features some very nicely 
stylised graphics and good 
m-game tunes. Making much 
better use of (he machine, 
this version provides a fot 
better value-f or- money and 
even does without the disk 
access required by the 
Amiga. 

OVERALL 82% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for 
the Spectrum (ta.99 
cassette. £12-99 diskette), 
Amslrad {£9,99 cassette. 
£14.99 diskette) and ST 
{£19.99 diskette). No 
versions are the game will be 
made available until an alt- 
format release toward the 
end Of Jury* 



AMIGA Diskette: £24.99 

The Amiga version has sharper graphics and clearer tunes than 
the C64, but Is little improved otherwise, making the game 
distinctly unimpressive visually. Addictive gameplay, however, 
turns this into One Of the better German releases available in the 
UK. 

OVERALL 78% 



"Addictive gameplay, however, turns this 

into one of the better German releases 

available In the UK." 



TGM IX 008:7-8881/124 



YOU'RE IT! 



LAZER TAG 



Once upon a time in America George A Carter til 
founded a company - Photon Entertainment - which 
used hi-tech to simulate Star Wars-type battles in 
franchised arenas for kids with lots of pocket money. 
Of the various systems which proliferated, Lazer Tag has 
proved one of the most successful (see feature in 
TGM001) and GO! picked up the computer game licence 
on the bizarre condition that there be no violence. The 
programming is by Pro be Software {Outrun conversions,) 

Apparently there is a Lazer Tag 
framing school where cadets can 
learn how to be expert in the game 
and earn promotion Training 
sessions are divided into two 
sections: tag and target in the tag 
section you guide your character 
through the arena to trie gate at its 
end. Other cadets may be shot for 
extra points, if they touch your 
character a Me is lost. 

Along the way equipment can 
be picked up for time and lives 
bonuses, Various vehicles drive 
across screen and have to be 
avoided, but towers car be shot at 
which reflect your lazer in 
Nor 33 colourful mm tt*« AmttfMd VMfMion, but much tMMttt - Spectrum *cr**r\ 




numerous direction Failure to 
reach the gate before the time 
limits runs out loses a life. It the 
gate is reached, a target section 
begins which has the character 
automatically running through the 
arena again, invincible, with the 
player able to shoot other cadets 
for points. In two-player mode 
players take turns rather than both 
being on screen at the same time. 
Ultimately, however, Lazer Tag 
looks and plays like an inferior and 
repetitive Commando clone, with 
SOme irritating quirks on machines 
such as the C64. 




fFiW gxKxffftiy tpgs his way up the ichu SO thMt hw mmy r#p hit w#y up 
another - Amstrmtt *cr**n 



COMMODORE 64/128 Cassette; £9.99, Diskette: £11.99 

The Commodore version has big graphics but rather bland 
colours and tune. More importantly cadets when shot can still kill 
you as they slowly walk off screen, which is irritating, as is Hie 
stunned stupor the character goes into after being shot making 
control difficult for a few seconds. Unlike the other two versions, 
enemy cadets don't actually fire at you but must touch the 
character to kHI, 

OVERALL 32% 



AMSTRAD CPC Cassette; £9,99. Diskette: £14.99 

The Amah-ad version has smaller but also more colourful 
graphics and a good continuous tune. Another plus point is that 
when cadets are shot they ere in slant fy taken off screen much as 
hi a conventional shoot- 'em -up. Nevertheless lack of variety in 
gameplay and somewhat sluggish responses make this a bel o w 
average Commando variant. 

OVERALL 54% 



SPECTRUM 48/128 Cassette: £8.99 

The Spectrum version is virtually identical in appearance to the 
Amstred one - albert In monochrome. Lack of colour and 
continuous tune are disadvantages on the Spectrum, but faster 
gameplay helps compensate. 

OVERALL 53% 



GOT are not planning conversions to any of the 16 -bit machines. 



"Lazer Tag looks and plays like an inferior, 
repetitive Commando clone ..." 



■ 



VERSION UPDATE 



PANDORA 

Rrebird 



Atari ST; Diskette £19.99 

FEATURING a slightly different 
layout from the Commodore 64 
game (reviewed TGM0071 it is 
essentially the same story of 
<ntersteilar drama- A salvage 
expert has been beamed aboard 
the dereect Pandora only to find 
many of its crew either mad or 
dead, Besides searching for alien 
objects to transport back to hts 
ship, the intrepid merchant must 
survive Pandora's efficient 
security system and a punk 
hooligan. 

The mam pan of this overhead- 
view arcade- adventure 
collecting various objects and 
interaction with the remaining 
crew members. Characters such 
as the punk seem interested only 
tn violence - the more reasonable 



characters, however , might ask for 
things, for example; the chemisl 
who wants a 'good read'. If you 
find the necessary item, return 
with it to the chemist, and by 
holding it - rather than having it in 
your pockets or backpack - you 
can trade with him for another, 
hopefully more useful object. 
Completing the mission earns a 
score dependent on the number 
of alien artifacts recovered. 

The most obvious improvement 
m the ST version is the graphics, 
which are both very attractive and 
exceptionally detailed. 

Unfortunately animation isn't quite 
so impresstve and sound is 
virtually non-existent. The 
scrolling consists of Sudden 
moves in the direction you're 



(ravelling rather than smoothly 
following your character, as on the 
C64. None of these factors impair 
gameplay and indeed the relative 
slowness makes H a little easier. 
and Jess irritating to play, since 
characters are not so btindtngiy 
last, More substantive 

improvements come in me form of 
a larger number of alien artifacts to 
be collected and a time limit which 
no longer kills you on zero * 



■nstead your score rs reduced. This 
user-friendliness is marred in part 
by the security shields which do 
kill you instantly. While not making 
best use of the ST - other than m 
graphics - this is a reasonable 
conversion and a computstve, 
atmospheric puule that won't 
take forever to solve 



ATARI ST: OVERALL 79% 



H you run into the Ship's Pn+sl you hMYfi't got m praymr 



627124TGM TX 008:7-88 




US til "*OU 



REVIEWS 



EXOSKELETAL FUN 



SOLDIER OF LIGHT 



This is Ace's third game, and the second coin-op 
conversion from venerable Softeks relatively new 
jabel, Coding is by a programmer almost as venerable 
as Softek, Christian Urquhsrt, one of the most 
experienced Spectrum programmers whose Hunchback 
was among Ocean's first commercial successes back in 
1984.) 

Xam'd Sleena is a Federation 
stontitrooper who has been given 
orders direct from the Galactic 
Ikgh Command- Several planets 
have been invaded by the hideous 
Empire end Xam's task is to Clear 
the worids of all enemy troops. He 
amves on the first planet wearing 
• damage- absorbing exoskefeton 

Monochromatic it maybe, but the animation, oemepiay mm} content make tot 
an ertnHttety piayabie coin -op con v ers io n — Spectrum screens 



smt and jet boots His weapon is a 
standard single-skim laser, but 
more powerful armament has 
been dropped on the planet, 
minus labels. Included in these 
weapon pods are armour-pier cing 
lances, double-shot fireballs and 
tnple-fira blasters. The latter is 
particularly satisfying to use (and 





Struggl/ftg towards the and Of level 
one, not far to go now before the 
confrontation with the massive 

end-ot-ievei android 

all but essential for the lethal 
moon -buggies), but a time limit 
means the slormtrooper always 
has to hurry - when time runs out 
a life is lost. 

After a planet is completed by 
defeating the eod-of-levei robot, 
you fly Xain to the next planet in his 
laser-equipped spaceship. 

Several waves of vanous suicidal 
enemy ships try end stop you. 
however Should you survive this 
onslaught then you can begin the 
ftghl for the next wortd. 

Planet two has a markedly 
different, prehistoric landscape 
with large poisonous plants. 
deadly flies and a huge sea 
monster. After this a muihioad 
allows access to planet three 
which has a huge, ruined temple 
inhabited by monks and a 
learsome Tutankhamen head if 
you die here levels 1 and 2 are 
ihoughtfuify rerecorded after level 
3, so merely pressing play loads 
them in - as good a use of 
multiload as can be imagined, 
although the 12B works no 
differently In addition whan you 
have conquered the third planet 



there is a continue play option. 
retaining your high score but 
progressively weakening your 
armour. 



SPECTRUM 48/1 28 

Cassette: £7.99 
+ 3 Diskette; E14.99 

The largely monochrome 
graphics of Soldier Of Dghi j 
cons (St on try impressive 
fast, making the game 
visually top class Sound FX 
are generally adequate wh ile 
gameplay is both very 
challenging and addictive. In 
conclusion this is a greet, if 
unoriginal, arcade conver- 
sion which makes excellent 
use of the Spectrum. The f 3 
disk version wont be ready 
for a while. 

OVERALL 86% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for 
both the Amstrad end C64 f 
priced identically 
F.Cl4 99disk 



li 



. challenging 

and addictive, II 

unoriginal, arcade 

conversion makes 

excellent use of the 

Spectrum." 



VERSION UPDATE 



DRILLER 

Incentive 



PC: £19.95 

THE 3-D arcade- adventure which 
swept the CRASH readers' 
awards for best game, best 
packaging and mosl imaginative 
game - Qnfler (reviewed T6M002- 
- has been converted to the PC. 

The uninhabited moon of Mitral 
it duo to be hit by a comet in four 
hours time Illegal mining by 
outlaw Ketars has left large 
quantities of gas trapped on the 
moon and unless this is released 
before the meteor hits Mural, the 
planet it orbits will be devastated. 
The objectrve is to explore Mrtral's 
IS mining sectors and release at 
least 50% of the trapped gas by 
placing drilling rigs over gas 
pockets. Some pockets are 
marked by a large X. others are 
hidden under buildings. Finding 
these structures, and opening up 
sectors so they can be explored, 
the Solving of numerous 



3-D puzzles carefully worked mto 
the atmosphenc landscape. 

Further problems, of a more 
arcade nature, are provided by 



Mitral's still active defence 
systems. 

The PC version of this 
acclaimed game is a reproach to 
dozens of B-bit conversions which 
appear indistinguishable from 
thsk original incarnalicms- 
incentives revolutionary 

Freescape solid 3-D runs so 
quickly on this machine that by 
adding a few more defence towers 
the game could almost be a pure 



arcade shoot- em-up. 

Game options include EGA/ 
CG A plus a choice of keyboard Or 
joystick (IBM and Amstrad 
versions). This is one of the best 
PC games we've seen and. with rts 
very useful Joed/save function, it 
should provide a substantial long- 
term quest of the first order. 



ATARI ST: OVERALL 95% 



Th* Mpm a d of the gome is amazing, mtthough nil this means is that you get stumped Quicker 




5199H 

IV • LlLlH 1 MeDTW 



QUADROIDPHENIA 



OOPS! 

Big Apple 



This is the first release by new software house, Big 
Apple, which has been launched by the multi-media 
entertainment organisation Prestwlch Holdings pic 
(we thought you might like to know that) The 
programmer behind Oops? is Big Apple's software 
development manager, Jason Kendall, who has 
previously written Squij, Wizard's Pet and Starsfayer- the 
latter being due for release by Firebird in August, 
The Quadrot-d is a special machine 



thai spends its existence trundling 
around the space- time continuum 
which, as every good student of 
Refatrvity Knows, rs mysteriously 
suspended over a contmuously- 
scrolhng Atomic Gravitational 
Field- The aim of the Quadroid's 
brief lives Is to collect gravity pods 
(GarydS) from the continuum gnd 
- made up of various patterns of 
square blocks - while avoiding 
falling on to the lethal Gravity FiekJ 
rtsetf. 
Unfortunately some parts Ol the 

Don t gmt mirxnmd. Quadra** 



gnd exist only lor relativist ic nano- 
seconds, and should Quadroid be 
on these When they disappear a 
life is lost. Other squares crack on 
first contact and break if you 
attempt to go over them again, A 
more serious hazard is presented 
by Rimlords who patrol the top and 
left-hand sides of Ihe screen - 
dawdle on the gnd lines and ihey 
deal out a punishment. An orange 
Electron Bomb bounces around 
the screen with the sole intention 
of reducing the Quadroid to 
dissonant quarks and protons. 





-UJJ 
JJJJJ-U-U 






GRID AND 
BEAR IT 

To help the Quadroid, there are 
spedal squares, marked with a 
question mark, which owe bonus 
points or an extra life. Also 
concealed under these squares 
are arrows which push the 
Quadroid m the direction they 
point - toward possibly dangerous 
situations Retaliation is aided by 
mines which are planted toy 
pressing fire - they detonate 
shortly afterward taking passing 
Rimlords with them 

Once all Garyds are collected 
from a screen. Ihe enemies die and 
your score is totalled up - with a 
bonus for the amount of time 
remaining When two levels have 
been completed a special no- 
eoemses bonus screen may be 
attempted. There are 32 screens 
m all, which remain ihe same from 
game to game allowing strategies 
to be developed and repeated. 
The inability to access higher 
levels - as m Bouktorxiash - is a 
drawback which may prove 
frustrating after losing your last We 
on level 31 . tout generally Oops! is. 
an original and enjoyable 
challenge if a little on the tough 
tUm 



COMMODORE 64 
Cassette £9,95 
Diskette: £14.95 

Given that this is essentially 
• puzzle game, the 
presentation it above- 
average with a slickly 
scrolling background, which 
changes direction every time 
the Quadroid does, some 
useful spot effects and ■ 
functional tune. 

OVERALL 75% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for 
the Spectrum (Cassette; 
£7.09 J, Atari ST, Amiga end 
PC (all CI 9.96). Big Apple are 
also considering developing 
a special cheat mode/extra* 
screens game add-on. 



■ 



if 



, Oops! Is an 
original and enjoy- 
able challenge." 



VERSION UPDATE 



THUNDERCATS 



Atari ST: £19.99 

WE SAID 1 1 was Imminent' back 
in TGM0O2 (Amstrad 87%, 
CBM64 86%, Spectrum 90%), 
but the ST version has been a few 
months arriving. Si ill. ihe graphic 
detail of villainy and superb 
honzon effect indicate the time has 
been well spent. 

Game structure and objectives 
remain essentially the same as on 
8-bit machines. Evil Mumm-ra has 
stolen Ihe fabulous Eye Of 
Thundera, kidnapped members of 
the Thundercat team and 
retreated to Castle Plunder. It's 



Don-O io the rescue! The 
Thundercats leader's quest is a 
honzontally-sc rolling combat 
game with Uon-O jumping 
yawning pit?, scything henchmen 
and kneeling to dispose of smaller, 
but equally vicious enemies 
Hitting containers gains point 
bonuses, extra weapons and lives 
In 14 levels, three are rescue 
missions with one chance to free 
an imprisoned Thundercat. 

This version offers mudv 
improved graphics and slick 
animation, which slightly slows the 
pace, but this is compensated for 
by shorter sword strokes 



demanding a greater precision in 
fighting. A tough, well-designed 
challenge, this is a compelling 
conversion that is a must for all ST 



owners, whether they be fans of 
the BBC series or not 



ATARI ST: OVERALL 85% 




Uon-O swmHowm M* prkt* and run* without pew* for the 






64 T24TGM TX 0087-88 



-J 



REVIEWS 



YOU 





EVERY SECOND COUNTS 



Do made 



Here is the next in what promises to be a long line of 
Domark TV Games. Domark purchased many titles 
last year from Macsen when that company collapsed. 
Every Second Counts is only the second TV Game 
which Domark have sou reed themselves - the first, not 
produced by Macsen, was the disappointing Krypton 
Factor, Both these original games have been programmed 
by Consult Computing, 

The structure of the game follows 
that ot the popular BBC TV 
programme fairly closely, but for 
the absence of Paul Daniels. You 
are asked to select which of s»x 
question blocks to toad in, then 
how many couples are playing, 
finally six characters appear on- 
screen whom players can choose 
to represent themselves if 
someone hasn't got a partner the 
player must take a fictional one 
and key m their answers. Should 
only one couple be playing, there's 
no computer opponent and they 
get all the questions to themselves 
- a big advantage since each point 
ados a second to the time 
avarfabie 'or the crucial final round. 
The f«rst round shows the 
selected players sitting at their 
oes*s. rf couples are playing 
the person whose picture appears 
at the top of the screen should 
answer the Question. Answering is 
done by pressing a true or false 
key and there isn't a time limit. If a 
player answers correctly the team 
gats iwo points, if the answer is 
wrong then the team is eliminated 
from the round . There are only n i ne 
questions m a round So the sooner 



other teams go out Ihe better. 
Round 2 is exactly the same, 
except it is now the second 
member of the couple who gets to 
answer. 

Following that is a bonus level 
which begins with the lowest- 
scoring team getting to select one 
of three categories of questions 
The team is then given the 
appropriate question which they 
have ten chances to answer 
correctly. If the first answer is 
correct ten points are awarded, 
nine on the next attempt, then 
eight and so on. The next lowest- 
scoring team gets to select one of 
the two rematning categories 
leaving the least popular one to the 
highest -scoring team. 

ALBANIA 

Rounds 3 and 4 are identical to the 
first and second but with twice the 
points for a correct answer . Hound 
5 is another bonus round, After it 
the team with the highest score 
then goes into the final round. 
Since there are only two players 



Iht morm buibm you put out, fft# mw* prvt* you win - tfmmt *a nothing like * 
Mof*fl«#of#rt#inm#nt-ArrT5fr»rfscr»n 







The COr*f*tmnt* buying Urn* by mmyktg ' Yi bmH ' - Commodor* icrtin 



involved, a second set of keys are 
provided, on the left- side of the 
keyboard, for player two. Control 
of selecting the right answer is 
then alternated between the two 
sets of keys - which can be rather 
confusing tor one player with the 
accumulated score now counting 
down as a time Jim it 

On the couple's shared desk 
there are seven lights, After 
selecting which of two categories 
to play four lights go up and to 
finish the round all- lights must be 
extinguished by selecting the right 
answer out of three possible 
Choices. The next section then 
adds another light and offers 
another choice of categories This 
process goes on until either all 
seven tights have been Irt and 
extinguished or time runs out. 
Should you be successful, there's 
a special Every Second Counts 
trophy screen, which probably 
isn't too much worse than a typical 
BBC holiday m Albania, 

While generally well -executed, 
with effective use of the muttiload 
on tape vens»on$ p Every Second 1 
Counts is limited by the shortness 
of each game so thai if three 
couples of similar abilities are 
pkayirng it's unlikely the winning 

couple will be able to amass 
enough time to be successful on 
the final round, if you have only one 
couple in the game then it's 
substantially easier, but playing 
alone can soon become boring as 
the reward of a trophy screen is 
meagre and diminishes 

substantially after being seen 
once. The amount of questions 
included in one load is impressive, 
especially on the final round, but 
bonus round questions in 
particular are exceptionally limited 
and soon loop round. 



AMSTRAO 

Cassette €7.95 
Diskette: £12.95 

The Am strati game has some 
nice, well-defined graphics 
with characters smiling 
when they get a question 
right. Tunes are similarly 
professional and present the 
game in a consistently 
attractive fashion. 

OVERALL 61% 



COMMODORE 64/128 
Cassette £7.95 
Diskette: £10,95 



The Commodore 

shows a similarly 

use of the computer with 

good tunes and 

graphics. 

OVERALL 61% 



OTHER FORMATS 

A conversion is expected for 
the Spectrum at £7.95 - there 
are no plans for a disk 
version. 



"While generally 

well-executed, Every 

Second Counts Is 

limited by the 

shortness of each 

game 11 



1 



TGM TX 008:7-8865/124 



REVIEWS 





LEATHER 



LEATHERNECK 



Microdeal 



Leatherneck is the first 16-bit game to incorporate 
simultaneous four- player action (though Gauntlet H is 
only seconds behind, see review on page 68.) For one 
or two players, the normal ST joystick ports are used 
but for three to four, a joystick adaptor (available from 
Microdeal at £5.95} is required. Steve Bak programmed 
the game, with graphics by Pete Lyon (of Airbalt and 
Gotdnjnner fame). 

A Commando variant in which 
maximum destruction of the 
enemy r* the name of the game, 
there « no subtle plot or complex 
gamepiay m i^athamack - simply 
kJH or be killed' 

It's set over four vertically push- 
scrolling rones set in a |ungle 
environment - a sort of Vietnam 
complete with oriental enemy 
soldiers to massacre, As is to be 
expected with Steve Bak 
programs, the vertical scrolling is 
excellent, and its nice to see that 
you don't have to move too far up 
screen to make the push-scroll 
work, Pete Lyon's graphics work 
well to recreate the | angry 
atmosphere huts, rocks and 
jungle paths are all effectively 
done with excellent graphics of 
crashed helicopters, aircraft and 
other wreckage throughout each 
zone. 

Each player Is armed with three 
weapons, a short-range, rapid-fire 
light machine gun . a longer-range, 
slow-fire heavy machine gun and 
a supply of grenades. Ammunition 
is limited, although extra supplies 
can be picked up throughout each 
zone, but with four players on 
screen, you have to Tight your 
friends as to Who gets it, 

$hOt*is * tough customer for matotta 
hoto to overcome 



SWATTING 

THE 

ENEMY 

Throughout each zone, enemy 
soldiers run on screen, either solo 
or groups, launching grenades or 
iirng rifles at you before running 
off. As well as soldiers, machine 
gun nests fire bullets in a 
continuous circular stream, and 
heavy guns guarding narrow 
jungle paths fire shells at anything 
that moves, A weif- aimed grenade 
is needed to dispose of these gun 
emplacements, A life is losl if a 
player is hit by a bullet, grenade or 
Shell or by physical contact with 
the enemy. The latter form of death 
is unfair considering the 
Leatherneck commandos ere 
pretty tough characters in 
comparison with the tiny Viet- 
Cong soldiers. 

At any time, current weapons 
can be changed either by pressing 
a key or rapidly moving the joystick 
back and forth Xenon-style; not a 




«:•>!« i> 



j* 








One tetdiof taft - and fw's or his Inst 
logs - the enemies' big guns intwnd 
to moko short work of him if f>#"i not 
CM*tul - ST scftnt 




ATARI ST 

Diskette: £19.95 

David Whittakor comes up 
with a good musical 
composition which suits the 
game. The horrifyingly 
realistic sound FX of 
screams and cries from 
fatally wounded soldiers and 
the explosions of grenades 
all add to the effect of grand- 
scale carnage, 

OVERALL 76% 



good method as violent joystick 
movements, especially in the heal 
of battle, are prone to cause 
accidental weapon changes. 

With four players, things can gel 
very cramped, the playing area is 
too small in relation to the size of 
the Leathernecks and the chance 
Of being hit by a comrade's bullet 
high, if the commandos could 
have fired through each other 
without harm the game may have 
been more challenging, but as it 
stands it's frustrating having io 
worry about both the enemy ana 
your friends' bullets! 

The addition of the rmilliplayer 
element makes Leatherneck a far 
more enjoyable game than a 
standard single- player shoot- em- 
up. Thought is needed to get past 
obstacles m each zone as running 
headlong into the enemy is 
invariably tataJ. LeafrWnecfc mighi 
have improved on Elites tkart 
Warrior$ in entedammoni value 
had the players not been so 
restncted by the disability to shool 
each other. 



If 1 ! 



**!'• 



1)1)1) 



HI I 1 



i»*yiiltf 



Dan 



HIP 

■- ****** 

1)00 

i lllv i 

• ._ m** mm f~w 



AMIGA 
Diskette: E19.95 

Amiga Lealherneck is exactly 
the same as the ST game in 
graphics, sound FX, use of 
colour and gamepiay. 

OVERALL 78% 



OTHER FORMATS 

None planned. 



11 . . . the tnultlplayer element makes Leath- 
erneck far more enjoyable than a single- 
player shoot-'sm-iip," 



66/124 TGM TX 008:7-88 











Based on Sega's superb Halls of Kairos coin op game 

you must free*those held captive by the great Satan, 

KAIROS. himself. Punch down the doors and 

explore the maze of halls and passageways that 

hold the key to extra energy and speed. Release 

those held captive behind vast mirrors and see 

yourself transform into an invincible fighting 

warrior. Watch out for the deadly 

henchmen, avoid the fireball hurling witches 

punch the fire breathing deer's headJMJjtfivatch your 

enemies disappear. Alone in battle ffl TOst enter the 

mysterious and supernatural wotw of Kairos- 

DETERMINATION, DEFIANCE. DESTRUCTION... 

. THAT 5... 







I. 




liJF/^l 



Out of the arcade into the computer... a fury of havoc 
and destruction straight from the Halls of Kairos . 



CIM MM2* C9.99ir f 14.99(1 ip*ctium 4a,[MK €8.99i * 3f I2,99d 
Amstr*d £9. 99c tl4-99d Mjm st £!9.99d 



U S CoM U4 . 

Unit* J/1 MoMlftf W«v 

Molterd l.im>fl,hl<tl M TAX 
Tfl Ml JJ* )H1 




A FIST OFI 




rnv^ 






fccnfa liupht* Vitmuir I id 



GAUNTLET II 

US GOLD 



The original Gauntlet coin-op conversion came in 
early- 1987 and met with the same phenomenal 
success as the arcade machine. Gauntlet Centered 
the arcades with favourable reviews and now the ST 
version of the four-player dungeons and dragons game is 
here. Richard Costello is the programmer, the video 
graphics were created by Kevin Bulmer with the effects 
squeezed into the ST by sound technician Bill Allen 



To recap lor ihose who haven'l 
played either com -op or home 
computer version, Gauntlet (t is a 
massive hack- 'n 1 -slay eight- way 
scrolling game viewed from a 
bird's-eye viewpoint and set in a 
multitude of dungeons. Up to four 
players can join in the action as 
they run around collecting keys, 
treasure, potions and food while 
mauling the mass of creatures 
inhabiting the dungeon. 

Each player starts off with 2000 
health points which decrease 
constantly, Food can be eaten to 
restore hearth, but watch out for 
poisoned bottles of cider. Keys 
collected can open doors and 
unlock chests to reveal the 
mystery Contents, either good or 
bad. 

The creatures of the dungeon 
include all of those from the 
original Gauntlet ghosts, rock- 
throwing lobbers. fire^spitting 
demons, gnunls. invisible 
sorcerers and the power-draining 
Death himself are all m unhealthy 
abundance, A few new creatures 
have wandered in. including an II ' 
monster and a "That ' monster; the 
former tags a player making 
monsters chase the unfortunate 
character, while the tatter latches 
onto anyone it chooses and takes 
away objects or health points. 
Health -draining acid puddles and 
forcefields are also to be found. 
while stun tiles freeze players in 
their tracks, A Mugger and Thief 
appear from time to time stealing 
health points and objects before 
running oft. 

ENTER THE DRAGON 

A new and deadly opponent is the 
Dragon. He makes an appearance 
on later levels. This red 
monstrosity spits fireballs and fnes 
players foolish enough to get too 
close. For much of the time the 
Dragon guards exits to next levels 
as well as a hoard of treasure. To 
kill it. stand well back and aim for 
the heed. 

Amongst collectable treasures 
are amulets giving special abilities 
such as reflected shots, temporary 
invisibility, superpower shots, 
limited invulnerability and even 
reputsrveness (the latter causes 
monsters to run away.) Potions are 
liberally scattered around, 
providing a smart bomb capability 



or extras to boost a ptayer's 
personal capabilities, 

Walls can be shot to reveal 
objects {or Death rf you're unlucky) 
and on later levels, players can 
enter secret rooms by following 
instructions appearing at the start 
of certam stages. As with 
Mecrodeal'S Leatherneck, for lour 
players to participate Gauntlet li 
requires the joystick adaptor 
priced at CS 99 and available 
direel from US Gold. 

The success of Gauntlet and its 
sequel lies mine four-player action 
and use of teamwork tactics; these 
leaiures have translated to the ST 
perfectly. For one player it could 
become shattow in fong-ierm 
entertainment through its 
repetitive nature, this type of game 
works best with two or more 
players. 

Following the disappoiming 
conversion of Gauntlet, the sequel 
is something of a miracle. II you're 
a fan of the con -op, buy the game 
and the joystick adaptor, get some 
friends round and play US Gold s 
best ST product to date 




REVIEWS 



-IRON TOO 




Vsikyrm ta bmiog set upon by tha Grunts on lov*[ 8 




Lwvwi 12 ami Vaikyfi* rs atttf going strong 



ATARI ST Diskette: £1999 

Scrolling is excellent, the sampled sound effects {over 70OK) are 
amazingly faithful to the coin-op, though speech is a tittle muffled 
tri places- The graphics are reduced in size slightly, bul la all 
intents and purposes this 15 the arcade machine in its detail, use 
of colour and accuracy. 1040 ST owners are rewarded with an 
erira 3GQK starting sequence . A picture of the arcade machine is 
shown (complete with the game playing on screen) which 
proceeds tO twist and turn towards the player. 

OVERALL 93% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Already available on Spectrum 48/423K: Cassette £8 99, 
Amstrad: Cassette £9.99, Diskette £14,99 and Commodore 64/ 
128 Cassette: £9,99 , Diskette: £1 1.99 An Amiga version is being 
considered but there is no release data or price decided at 



"... US Gold's best ST product to date." 



25,000 tons of awesome 

power knifes its way 
through an ink black sea! 





liirralui drjphii:* Nuke'iir Led. 



WAR PAPER PATTON 



PATTON VERSUS ROMMEL 



Electronic Arts 



Chris Crawford, author of Patton Versus Romm&t is 
also the programmer of the definitive 16-bit strategy 
game Balance Of Power This, his latest wargame, 
uses an imaginary situation but one based on an 
actual battle from WWII. The conflict, known as Operation 
Cobra, took place in July of 1944 when American Forces 
undertook an offensive to push Allied divisions forward 
through France. 



Patton of trie US Army and Field 
Marshall Rommel did not 
encounter each other in the 
ensuing fight {Patton arrived a 
week after the start of the otiensive 
while Rommel was withdrawn 
following injuries from allied fighter 
attacks J Chns Crawford has 
however produced a 'what-if' 
scenario in which the Iwo military 
leaders are present ai the time of 
the conflict. 

The display is clean, with the 
map of the Normandy area 
occupying two- thirds of the 
screen, and the uncluttered Status 
display/unit information neatly 
taking up the remainder. 

The map is a digitised aerial view 
of Normandy and uses 
monochrome to excellently 



caps Lire the atmosphere of the 
conflict. The units on screen are of 
the relatively simple square- 
character type but also display 
various strengths and levels of 
power depending on the function 
selected, A numerically strong unit 
is shown as a large circle and 
morale as a series of cracks which 
spread m the unit's character as 
its confidence Is weakened. 

With three skill levels - beginner, 
intermediate, expert - the 
Objective for all is the seme: Ihe 
Americans must progress and 
capture key positions while the 
Germans must hold off the attacks 
to the final turn of the game - 
August 6. Each skill level brings in 
more functions and commands 
expanding the strategies and 



game possibilities available to 
each commander. Venous scales 
of orders can be issued from single 
commands to multiple action 
orders, Ail commands are issued 
through icons displayed in the 
status box. a speedy method both 
slick and accurate. 

HOW THE 
AMERICANS WON 
THE WAR 

The beginner game uses basic 
strategies as an introduction, but 
the strategy element is powerful 
even at this level, so don't expect 
a walkover. 

The intermediate level brings in 
an extra feature in the form of 
modes of execution, whereby a 
unit can be commanded to take 
up a normal, defensive or offensive 
mode and perform against, enemy 



JWnl 



units accordingly Umls may also 
be set modes for movement, The 
modes of attack lifts Parian Versus 
Rommel above a lot of wargames. 
provides a targe amount of depth 
and opens up the possibilities of 
creating effective strategies 
against the enemy, 

The expert level is a fuii-trfown 
master conflict oftenng the player 
all available options, functions and 
commands Akin to the 
'nightmare' level in Balance Ot 
Power, the expert game is tough 
and tests your skits to the 
maximum. 

Ai the end of each turn, Patton 
or Rommel or both (depending on 
who is playing whom} offer words 
of wisdom based on the player's 
implementation of strategies and 
their effectiveness in operation. 

The game continues to the last 
hours of August 8, whereupon you 




Gftf* 

OPT1QMS 



a: 



.,-• -VI 



IT'S ALL GREEK 
TOME 



HERCULES 

Gremlin Graphics 



The Spectrum version of H&rcuies is credited to two 
people: Des O'Toole for coding and Cheryl handling 
graphics. The Commodore version, by contrast, 
enjoys a veritable horde: John Tometzki 
(programming} Andy Morton (music), Norman lllings and 
Bob Hawker (graphics), while design needed Nicholas 
Mills, John Tometzki and Des O'foole Collectively all 
these people help make up Cynus Software, 

final confrontation with Nossus. a 
massive centaur 

The weapons are club, fists and 
feet. In true Barbarian fashion 
eight combat moves are accessed 
with fire pressed, all given names 
such as Mountain Shaker and 



Hercules, son of Zeus the 
Olympian king of gods, and the 
man famous for his 1 2 impossible 
tasks, joined Jason for many 
ad venl ures m search of the Golden 
Fleece. As one of Jason's 
Argonauts he fought against a 
horde of skeletons, and it is this 
battle which the game celebrates. 
You (Hercules) fight one 
skeleton after another - while 
simultaneously attempting to 
colled all 12 Herculean Tasks, 
represented by glowing icons 
falling from the top of the screen, 
To collect the Tasks. Hercules hits 
them with his club. When he has 
them all he can then go on to his 



Pluto's Messenger. There's even 

H+rculm* trying to ffr*d (*♦ A*y to 
dctentinv th# sketfiton - Spectrum 

■MR 



70/124 TGM TX 006:7-88 




an overhead blow much like the 
decapitation move in the Palace 
game, but it can be a source of 
irritation since pushing up without 
fire pressed turns Hercules to face 
the other way. 

A more original touch is the 
magical ability ol the creatures 
which can only be harmed when 
standing over a wrrthing snake 
depicted at the bottom of the 
screen, When Hercules Is doing 
well Ihe snake shortens, If he's 
losing, it helpfully lengthens. To 
further complicate matters a 

Than* ffw Oocfa th» wnmmyt* notm 
*4mtottaut - Commotion 



SPECTRUM 

Cassette: £7.99 
Diskette; £12.99 

The Spectrum version 
Only one life and 
is represented as a 
lug -of -war between 

Hercules and the skeletons. 
Graphically Hercules and his 



repf e lented ■ but sluggish to 
respond to controls. 

OVERALL 44% 



spider descends from the screen 's 
top to steal already collected 
Labours Hercules must hit the 
spider to stop this happening. All 
the Aegean mythological fun fails 



h 


?bC^S 




Mi 


^ fe^ j££^' "■- 


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REVIEWS 



are giver a performance rating. 
■long wrtti special treatment if your 
performance was exceptional. 

Patron Versus Rommel is on© of 
those oebghtfu] wargames which 
looks - and to a certain extent ■& - 
simple in play but has enough 
strategy to maintain interest, tt 
also offers the option foe one or 
two players. 



COMMODORE 64/128 

Diskette: £14.95 
The graphics are well 
thought out, presented 
needy and not just a mass of 
statistics and characters 



cluttering up the screen, 
With three *kin levels end a 
considerable amount of 
game possibilities on offer, 
this is a deceptively complex 
gam*. It is only available on 

3ml 

OVERALL 76% 



OTHER FORMATS 

No other versions planned. 



"... one of those 
delightful war- 
games, simple in 
play but enough 
strategy to maintain 
interest." 



to stimulate; the game's based on 
a bred formula and fails to bring 
anything new or excitingly 
different to the genre. 



COMMODORE 64/126 

Cassette: 

£9,99, Diskette: £14.99 

Hercules has three lives and 
his 12 Labours are helpfully 
shown on screen, winking 
out when they're completed. 
fn addition each combatant 
has his own energy bar. Ail 
these factors help make this 
version easier and a touch 
more enjoyable than the 
Spectrum game. 

OVERALL 47% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for 
Ainsti ed: cassette C9.99, 
disk £14.99. MSX: cassette 
£7.99 and Atari ST: 
£19:89. 



based on a 
tired formula, the 

Aegean 
mythological fun 

fails to 
stimulate ..." 



PHANCY THAT 



PHANTASM 



Exocet 



Exocet's second release continues the recently- 
formed software house's policy of promoting new 
talent in the industry. Phantasm is written by Ron De 
Sartti - this is his first, graphically very polished, 
release. 



A phantasm is an illusion, a 
ligmeni of the imagination which 
may be used to escape from a 
mundane, rf not depressing reality. 
Exocet s Phantasm sees your 
dreams taking a decidedly 
militaristic turn with you in 
command of Pegasus, the 
ultimate space skimmer. Under 
the power of its incredibly 
sophisticated engines Pegasus is 
soaring through a different time 
and gafaxy past an eerily beautiful 
moon. There's no time to 
appreciate the scenery, though, 
because enemy spacecraft wait <n 



destroyed alien ships. If you can 
find, and terminate these eight 
alien artifacts you might just stand 
a chance 



PHLOX ER 



ERS 



Phantasm is presented in class»c 
Tau Csfr fashion, offering a pilot V 
eye view of 3-D combat a couple 
of metres above the surface of the 
alien moon. The joystick controls 
left and right movement, and 
speed via forward Or backward 
movement - rarely needed height 



ts controlled with the keyboard 
The skimmer's main weapons are 
Phloxer lasers, but these are 
augmented by eight AMBs 
(AntiMissile Blasters), useful tor 
defence purposes. Aiming these 
weapons is aided by a Backtasn- 
style radar scanner superimposed 
Over the combat screen. Since 
both buildings and enemy ships 
are shown as the same white dots, 
practice is required to make beat 
use of this display 

Other instruments include AOF 
(Automatic Direchon Finder) and a 
tracking indicator; status 
indicators are represented as 
windows at the bottom of the 
screen. Repairs and restocking 
Pegasus is achieved by slowly 
colliding with an enemy milrlary 
Supply dump. 

There are four levels of 
increasing difficulty, selectable at 
the start, to provide a long-term 
challenge. Completing the game is 
no easy task, especially without a 
save option. 



AHB ACTIUATED 
PRESS FIRE TO START 



Doing b.mlo with 9 Striker crfft in ffiis J^u Cetf Jw»k-4-f'*e 



ambush and a few dazzling shots 
disable those wonderful engines m 
seconds, 

Stncken. Pegasus falls into the 
moon's gravity well and is 
inexorably pulled down to its 
surface impulse engines save Ihe 
vehicle from a fatal crash and 
provide power to move around - 
and fight. The moon turns out to 
be infested with masses of alien 
craft with little better to do than 
finish the work begun on the 
Pegasus. Defeating such 
Overwhelming odds seems 
impossible, but out of some 
obscure part of your mind comes 
knowledge of the mystenous alien 
ReConstitutions. These weird and 
immensely powerful devices are 
named for their ability to 
reconstitute the remains of 



ATARI ST Diskette: £19 95 

Distinguished by the sort of heavily detailed, and graphically 
impressive, instrumentation normally associated with 
Psygnoste, Phantasm is very attractive at first glance, 
Presentation I9 further augmented by some nica sound FX. But 
highly derivative of rat >•' . it lacks the depth which made that 
game so successful. As a pretty and fast shoot- 1 Am -up, Phantasm 
is above-average and might be worth a look. 

OVERALL 73% 



OTHER FORMATS 

An Amiga conversion should be available towards the end of 
June, No price yet, 



a pretty and fast sttoot-'em-up, Phan 
tasm is above- average ..." 



t* 







TGM TX 006:7-8871/124 



^^^" 



REVIEWS 



NEVER WALK ALONE 



FOOTBALL MANAGER 2 



Addictive Games/Prism Leisure 



Football Manager, devised by Kevin Toms of 
Addictive Games, has been an incredible success 
story. Smce its creation on the Sinclair ZX-81, six 
years ago, over half a million copies nave sold - the 
game is even now still selling, proving that you don't need 
fancy graphics or sound to make for a challenging game 
with excellent long-^enm appeal. What about its 

successor? 

Football is (lie sport and team 
management is the game. Select a 
ieam from the 92 available and the 
task of taking them through the 
Football Season begins. 

The season begins in Division 
Foot, half a million in the bank and 
extra money from a sponsoring 
company. The overriding 
Objective is 10 progress to Division 
One and win the maior Division 
and League Cups along the way. 

The first difference between this 
and the preguel is that the team 
playing each match can be set up 
to surf the manager's tactics. 
Eleven players and two 
Substitutes must be available to 
play, otherwise the match is 
forlettad. 

FIT AS A PARROT 

Players have a skill and fitness 
rating and plays against opposite 
numbers accordingly. The Ihree 
standard groups are used: 
defender. midf»e»d and attacker 
with a goalkeeper as the final 
defence. Players can be placed 
anywhere »n the team, although 
ptayers out of their normal 
grouping enter matches with a skill 
of i, however fitness levels are 
unaffected. 

As before, you have no control 
over the team during matchplay, 
all you can do is watch as the game 
unfolds. Tha match highlights are 
best taken wrth a pinch of salt at 
times goals appear to be scored 
and yet nothing happens, the 
players move comically and mark 
each other by following their 

Smtling up four mttmck squad prior to 



and create new formations to 
counter the play and opposition 
tactics. 

As usual, players can suffer 
in|unes during the game (any 
player having fitness of under 50% 
cannot piny) and they can take 
some time to recuperate, often 
missing several matches while 
receiving medical attention. 



UNDER THE MOON 

The team finances have to be kept 



Out Of the transfer market or 
bought by another team , As a learn 
moves up through the Divisions, 
so the value of its players 
increases, and as matches are 
won and lost, the team positions in 
each Division change. Aher the 
final game between the other 
Division teams is played, the top 
three teams of each Division art 
promoted with the bottom three 
Suffering relegeHon. 

Wrth six years of football tactics 
and games to draw ideas from, 
football Manager 2 is a Surprising 




n't nmil-tnttng tim* -*Ufou c*n do %9 watch as th* match untoida 



opposite number's movements 
exactly Team tactics are 
dependent on a number of factors: 
players ' skill and fitness levels and 
the team's formation and 
groupings- Using the strategies 
and tactics learnt from watching 
matches, you can train players to 
perfect ball skills by increasing the 
height and length the ball reaches. 
A random element is also at work 
just to make sure no match is a 
walkover for a superior side. At the 
hatftrme mark, you can change the 
team around, bring on substitutes 




under control at all limes, Losses. 
in revenue are inevitable through 
team overheads, lack of gate 
receipts and purchasing of players 
- but provided you remain solvent, 
you're sun m the League. 

Players can be bought at 
various prices depending on their 
skill level and current fitness. Any 
offers made have to be within 
acceptable Mmrts otherwise the 
player In question is either pulled 



disappointment. There is nothing 
particuiarty new to the program to 
make rt worth the wait. However , it 
has been a long time since 
Football Manager and though this 
is no significant advance over the 
original, the sequel is a good game 
lor football fanatics because as it 
marginally improves on some of 
Football Managers better poini sit 
will no doubt have the same 
massive long -term appeal. 



ATARI ST Diskette: £19,99 

Text Is predominant. The match highlights graphics are little 
better than average, with only spot sound FX. Use Of the ST*t 
WIMP environment is kept to a bare minimum wrth an 
oversensitive mouse control in use, There arm nine selectable 
skill levels and save/load game position options. 

OVERALL 85% 



OTHER FORMATS 



scheduled for release soon on Spectrum 4S/1 28, 
Commodore 64/128 and Amstrad CPC all at £9.99 cassette and 
£14,99 Disk, with Amiga and PC versions at £19,99. 



it 



. a surprising disappointment and no 
significant advance over the original . . . " 



72 t24TGM TX 008:7-88 





© 



'» 



o 



.cs 




o 




■••« • *•** lie 

••Ft »1#* «*•«■■ 



LICENSED BY INFOGRAMES TEL: 01 364 0123 © S.E.P.P. DEUEGE 1988 

MITRF HOIIAF AHRFY RHAD ENFIELD. MIDDLESEX. EN1 2HQ. 



FREESCAPE'S BACK 



DARK SIDE 

Incentive Software 



Fi reescape makes its second appearance in the 
sequel to last year's blockbuster, Drifter, The project 
has been masterminded by Driller's authors Major 
Developments and while the Freescape routine has 
been technically improved it runs just 5% faster than the 
Drilt&r animation. The story tells of the continuing saga 
between the Ketar$ h a banished race t and their planned 
revenge on the people of Evath, 



200 years have passed since 
Owffler, and the Ketars have 
completed construction of Zephyr 
One, a powerful laser weapon. 
Situated on Evath 'a moon. 
Tricuspid, it is aimed straight at 
Evath intent on destruction. 
Zephyr One is gradually gaining 
power from a network of ECOs 
(Energy Collecting Devices,) Solar 
power is captured and stored in a 
crystal at the top of the tower -like 
apes Of the ECDa. The energy - 
when at sufficient level - is to be 
sent along the power line matrix 
covering Tricuspid's surface to 
subsequently detonate Zephyr 
One. 

Vour objective is to patrol the 1 8 
sectors of Tricuspid disabling the 
ECOs, and cutting the potential 
power supply from Zephyr One, 
achieved by shooting the 
collection crystal. However, if your 
target ECD is connected between 
two other active ECOs the shot 
crystal immediately regenerates. 
The whole planet is I Ike an intricate 
Chinese puzzle. 

As in Dfllter t each of the 18 
sectors is viewed in first-person 




The tmck o4 colour ta /norm then mmde up for by in* ap e md ofpley - Spectrum 




Therm ete mon then enough geometric ptuiU 
sometime -Spectrum 9Cre*n 



wpevtHt the mi 




ids busy for put 10 

perspective and can be seen from 
any possible position Dark Side 
offers the lonely adventurer no 
transport - it is mostly down to 
footwork with occasional help 
from your jet-backpack. The 
locations are displayed as if seen 
through a spaeesuit visor - this 
also snows your instrument panel, 
useful for keeping tabs on 
direction, whether you're 
Standing, crawling or pi -packing 
and the amount of fuel and shield 
energy you have Shields and fuel 
can be replenished by collecting 
power crystals. Other objects to 
be found on Tricuspid include the 
tar d is -like Tetepod and Plexors - 
which appear as geometric tanks 
and act as Tricuspids automatic 
defence system. However, most 
objects discovered are part qt 
Dark SMs's many puzzles 

The Commodore 04/128 0*tk Sid* 
is not quite reedy, but from whn t 
we've teen of *t, rt tecks nothing its 
B'txt cousin* have - except speed. 
The tcreen shot shows tit* 
jw»mm« fight of Zephyr 
On* -end it's your job to dtsenn it 



74/124TGM TX 008:7-88 



REVIEWS 









HALF THE GAME 

Disabling (he ECD matrix is only 
half the game, there are a host ol 
puzzles to deal with, Solving them 
if necessary if the game is to be 
completed 'or example, 
discovering the entrance to the 
underground network of tunnels 
makes for easier exploration of 
Tricuspid, 

Many of Driller's features have 
bean incorporated, the adjustable 
stop sue. angle ol vision, and the 
load/save facility 



To complete Dark Side. aH the 
ECD crystals have to be destroyed 
(though nol In any particular 
order) Dark Stcfe's game plan is 
more involved and demanding 
than that of its predecessor, htot 
SO much addictive as engrossing, 
once you have broken into the 
game it becomes difficult to stop 
playing, The full potential ol 
Freescape has been realised in 
Dark Side, whereas before step 
size and angle of vision ware 
interesting, they now become 
essential parts of the game Dark 



Tricuspid Sphinx ot trttach»ry 05 the KrotOr i pow&f up Ztphyr Ono- Amstrao" 




Side, quite simply, is top class and 
certainly the truest arcade 
adventure yet seen. 



AMSTRADCPC 
Cassette £9.95 
Diskette: £14.95 

Similar to Drifter's 

implementation, this 

machine handles the 
graphics well, Incorporating 
sharp, defined images. Using 
graphics mode-1 gives a 
four-colour display of clear 
and attractive landscapes. 
Plenty of spot FX and jingles 
add spice to the action 
making Dark SirM an essential 
purchase for Qnlk* addicts 
and newcomers alike. 

OVERALL 93% 



SPECTRUM 48/128 

Cassette £9,95 
Diskette: £14.95 

Playing similarly to the 
Amstrad version but largely 
monochromatic - although 
the colours change from 
sector to sector. Using 
affective shading to highlight 
the landscapes variations. 
Dark Stde runs slightly faster 
on the Sped ru m . Informative 
spot FX and sparse music 
make up the sonics, but it all 
adds up to a superb 
package; the sort of gams 
which is keeping the 
Spectrum market alive. 

OVERALL 93% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Versions planned are Commodore 64/1 28, (a mite slow in 
gameplay at present but Incentive promise more speed; cassette 
C9.99. disk £12.99. To came are 16- bit conversions for the PC, 
Atari ST and Amiga (although we are stitl awaiting ST and Amiga 
■?•') later this year. 



"Dark Side is top class and certainty thi 
truest arcade adventure yet seen.' 



»• 



PASSING GO! 



DELUXE MONOPOLY 

Leisure Genius 



This is an update of the original Monopoly released by 
Leisure Genius over three years ago. The 
programming team is Steve Barrett (sound). Antony 
Scott (graphics) and John Baldachin 
(programming). Their previous work includes the original 
Monopoly, Scrabble and Ciuedo. 



Computer Monopoly is an 
Accurals enough representation of 
the original to include some rules - 
such as the auctioning of every 
property you l&ndon -which many 
players do without. The game, tor 
those somehow unfamiliar with it. 
is to travel around a board buying 
up property squares which, when 
grouped in streets can have 
houses and hotels built on them. 
Should other players land on your 
property I hey pay rent applicable 
to ihe quality ol the property, Al 
the game's conclusion one player 
ends up owning most of the board 
since the other players have sold 
Ihe winner their property to pay 
rent - a monopoly' 

FAST 

MOVES 

The computer game's major 
advantage is that the program 
provides an opponent; all six 
possible players can be computer - 



controlled, but since you must 
press fire to have them roll the dice 
you can't simply $it back and 
watch the property war develop, 
Other advantages include being 
able to save the game and a short- 
game version wh Ich asks how long 

It appears Char Viryrn/laitur* Gtnlua hin tho monopoly on comput*ri»od 
board feme* 

BITOT 



a game you want - In hours and 
minutes - then deals out a lew 
property cards to get things 
started . 

When the game begins dice are 
shown rolling in a box at the 
bottom left ol the screen, this 
nicely animated graphical frill is 
repeated for each go and after it's 
finished the player's icon is shown 
moving around the board wh He ihe 
streets passed over are displayed 
m large graphic detail, scrolling by 
at the bottom of the screen 
{Fortunately there is a fast move 
option which speeds this up.) 

The new version of this steadily 
selling computer game includes a 
tidying up ot the control systems. 
with ail commands now grouped 
together on a strip al the lop of Ihe 
screen. The commands - from left 
to right - allow players to quit or 
save games, mortgage a property, 
display what street owners have. 
buy houses, trade properties, 
collect rem. roll dice lo start the 







next turn, enable the fastmove 
option and switch between 
showing a player's finances or not, 
The smoothness of these 
operations, which can be 
controlled by joystick Or keys, is 
let down slightly by the fiddling 
nature of things such as placing 
houses individually on their 
properties. 



COMMODORE 64/128 

Cassette; £12.95 
Diskette: £15.95 

The board game Is wall- 
translated, with some nice 
spot FX like the tune which 
plays when you pan OO. For 
a game of acquisition, the 
lack of money and mortgage 
cards to conceal under your 
aide of the board is a serious, 
if inevitable omission, but if 
you want a computer 
opponent, this pMN 

provides ft in a very welt 
presented context. 

OVERALL 74% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Conversions are planned for 
Atari ST. Amiga, PC and 
Apple II - but no information 
on prices or release dates as 
yet 



"The new version 
includes a tidying up 
of the control sys- 
tems." 



TGM TX 008: 7-88 75H 24 



REVIEWS 



ETERNAL TRIANGLE 



BERMUDA PROJECT 



MlfTOfSOfl 



Source of myth and mystery, many ships and 
aeroplanes have vanished without trace since time 
immemorial in the Bermuda Triangle. Few of the lost 
in this area of intrigue have survived or returned to 
report strange happenings, Of course many more craft 
have traversed the triangle without the slightest hint of an 
alien occurrence. Film, books and software have long 
used the phenomenon as inspiration for material, now 
Mirrorsoft present their notions in the guise of an arcade- 
adventure 



Opening with a plane crash to nval 
tan Wamcrs, Bermuda Protect 
gives the initial impression of 
attention 10 detail, a trademark of 
Mirroreoft's recent products. 
Fol towing (he less-than- 

comfortable landing on a small 
island within the triangle, an 



Movements and decisions are 
■controlled by the mouse and 
options are called up in windows. 
The usual Examine, Get. 
Inventory, Load/Save etc are ail 
there to utilise. The scenery scrolls 
only when the character ts at the 
screen's edge, but since there are 



/ ttort't think this pilot wi (m ftying again In a hurry 




■■prop 








Us* 




J 




• >.' r i o n i 










** ^0 










f* 


WG 




V 


r 




\ 



Thajmap ami skeleton provide Hems nwtHwy to your quest, but ware* out 
for the scorpion! 



taw sudden deaths waiting in the 
wings this is not as irritating as it 
might have been. Sound effects 
are present throughout and 
although basic, they can warn of 
impending danger or obstacles. 



Bermuda Protect - an interesting 
idea - provides sufficient tasks to 
keep you busy, and this, coupled 
with the attractive screen displays , 
makes a passable game for 
ptayers with an adventure beffl. 



ATARI ST Diskette; £24.99 

Mouse control of the main character is frustrating at times 
although the scrolling is com para lively good. The island scenery 
is attractive but sparse and sound FX leave a lot to the 
imagination. However there is soma small in- built incentive to 
get somewhere - although the lack of hints available make it 
perhaps tougher than it should be. 

OVERALL 61% 



OTHER FORMATS 

An Amiga version will be released very soon, price £24,99 



"... an Interesting Idea provides 

sufficient tasks although tougher than it 

should be." 



enticing tune plays and the 
message to insert disk 8 nestles 
beneath an attractive graphical 
representation of the game to 
come. 

The aim of Bermuda Project is 
to get off the island. You find 
yourself staggering to your feet 
after being hurled from the plane - 
by now merrily burning away, If 
you want to salvage anything 
before it blows up your first task is 
id extmg u i sh the flames . Real-time 
plays a large part in the game so 
pausing for loo much thought is 
not recommended. Successfully 
dousing the fire reveals a number 
of items to add to your inventory - 
as does following the footprints 
found close to the wreckage. 

MY RUCKSACK ON 
MY BACK 

Playing very much as an adventure 
- with animated graphics rather 
than text - Bermuda Project takes 
brain rather than brawn to 
complete, Viewed from above, you 
are depicted as a well animated 
man (complete with rucksack), 
walking around the screen m a 
sometimes Quite erratic fashion. 



VERSION UPDATE 



KARNOV 

Eleclric Dreams 



Commodore 64: 
Cassette £9.99 
Diskette El 4,99 
Amstrad CPC: 
Cassette £9,99 
Diskette £14.99 

IT IS the task of Kamov, fire- 
breathing Russian, to free his land 
of evil Ryu's demons and retrieve 
the stolen treasures of Babylon. 
His battle takes place in the 
honzontally-SCroHing Kingdom of 
Creaminai - see the full review m 
TGMOOT. 

The overall look of the three S-brt 
games is one of extraordinary 
similarity - as ii the program has 
simply been down-loaded from 
one to the other. This technique 
works line on the Amstrad but tails 
miserably on the Commodore 54/ 
123, The gameplay on the latter is 




Looking very similar to the Commodore 64 vernon. the Amstrad 

gam* incorporates tfte best gamaptay 



appallingly stow with abysmal 
sound accompaniment, Graphics 
on both machines are blocky but 
the Amstrad gets away with it. and 
in tact comes a very close 
second lo the Spectrum game 

Kamov is a multiloao game 
which makes cassette versions 



more tedious lo play, buy the disk 
game if you can. 

COMMODORE 64/128: 
OVERALL 44% 
AMSTRAD CPC: OVERALL 
81% 



i 



76/124TGM TX 008: 7-38 




Fl 

f; 

THE A 1 

WO 

TE] 

TH] 

Ok 

BES 

HORROR 

o • r » 

FANTA! 
LISTEN 
THE AU 
FILM-MA] 
KPERTS 
IT'S 

PALPABLE 
TASTE FEAR 
NOW! 



Pkaw note the conic n Is »h<i* n 

on the Issue I cover abo 1 . 

lu tonvcv an imprcssn-n and 

nol be the umtu the contests actually 

published in the hr 






Onthi'otherhwrtdj Vn -'dbythtfprospectofFEARth.it I would like 

to subscribe, and I understand that there is a subscribe rs* discount r*Un ,irul 
ionwsnuiifiespeciiil tillers Plea se send me the de taih im mediately . . . 
Please tick this box if you would like subscription details; [~ 

Send lorm (o: 

FEAR OPENING OFFER, NEWSFIELD, PO BOX 20 T 
LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE SYS 1DB 



KHAR 

On sale from June 



m 




CUBBING TOGETHER 




Cornne Russell certainly fills the packaging Marteeh 
gave her for the cover picture, but does the game 
pack as much in? The programmers of Vixen are 
based in Brighton and call themselves Intelligent 
Design. Their previous game for Marteeh was the 
graphically impressive Catch -23. 

The planet Granath spins in a 
parallel universe where dinosaurs 
remain the kings of terror. Over 
eons the terrible lizards have 
hunted most mammals, and 
almost every human, to extinction. 
Only one, magical woman remains 
to resist them - the eponymous 
Vixen. Raised by foxes after her 
abandonment >n the wilderness, 
Vixen is able to transform into a 
fox when necessary. Armed with 
this gift and her lethal whip, she's 
a formidable heroine. 

Vixen is composed of a series of 
levels, the majority on the planet's 
surface, with bonus screens 
played underground where Vixen 
becomes her foxy alter-ego. The 
mam levels have the superbly 
digitised woman running to get to 
the tunnel before time runs out. 

Weapon pon*<f, the foxy lady prepares to give the enemy a taste of her anger. 
Lee* colourful than the Atari ST game, this version is faster and the main 
character is equally welt animated - Spectrum screen 



Attemplmg to prevent this and 
make her their next meal are A wide 
variety of small, but deadly 
dinosaurs, Vi xen can kill these with 
her whip, though some take 
several hits - unless she is armed 
with the Mega Whip found m the 
bonus level. 

This section is accessed by 
completing a level with the Fox 
Time indicator, at ihe top of the 
screen, on maximum. Increasing 
Fox Time is done by collecting 





Even at Ihe flow pace of tttm Amstrad game. Vixen haa to atop for the occa* 
stonal neat - Amstrad screen }) 



In poeeesaionol the Mega- whip, the 
enemies of Vixen are dealt deadly 
bfowa -ST tureen 

Fox's heads hidden m bags 
hanging from trees. Using the whip 
e xposes wfi a t ' s in them . as wel I as 
the contents of small obelisks on 
the ground. Contained wiifim the 
obelisks are gems {points), clocks 
(extra time), skull- and -cross 
bones (smart bomb), fox's heads 
(lives) and mystery objects which 
boost your score. 

Al the end of a level the amount 
Of remaining time is translated Into 
extra points and, if Fox Time is 
sufficient, Vixen is shown 
metamorphosing into her bushy - 
tailed other self. The aim of the 
bonus game is to collect as many 
gems as possible while still getting 




AMSTRAD CPC 

Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette; £14 99 

A nice title page, but the 
gems rapidly deteriorates 
from this point. Scrolling is 
poor, the matn character is 
barely adequate and moves 
very slowly. With mediocre 
graphics and poor payability 
it's very much the worst of 
the group - even with three 
game versions. 

OVERALL 42% 



OTHER FORMATS 

A conversion is expected for 
the Amiga: C19.99 



to ihe end of ihe level. Some 
obelisks coniam Mega-Gems, 
and, unless Vixen loses them by 
dying, they add bonus points at 
the end of a level. 

Much has been made of the 
game's intendedly sexy 

packaging, but beneath the 
skimpy leotard, and admittedly 
very fine graphics, on both versions 
(and good tune on the ST), Wxen is 
an attractive and involving 
Thundercafs-type program 

without offering anything 
signif canity new, 



64/128 
Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette: £12.99 

Lacking the neat main- 
character animation of most 
of the other versions - a few 
frames of movement are 
missing - the game makes 
up for (t with speed. 
Gameplay is further 

improved by an in-game tune 
- non-existent on other 8- bit 
versions - (hat adds to the 
atmosphere. Nevertheless 
the game remains weak and 
repetitive and is limited by 
the inclusion of only one 
version, 

OVERALL 61% 



SPECTRUM 

Cassette: £8,99 
Diskette; £14.99 

No less than on the ST, Vixen 
is excellently animated, 
though lack of background 
graphics makes it 
Payability is much the 
albeit with five lives n 
of the ST's ten. No murtiload. 
but the tape has three gams 
versions, each writh a title 
page, but not markedly 
different in -game graphics. 

OVERALL 60% 




ATARI ST 

Diskette: £19-99 

A superbly digitised li 
screen establishes 

consistently professional 
use ot ST graphics, Scrolling 
is below par, but adequate, 
and eclectic backgrounds 
work well, with animal 
camouflage sometimes too 
effective. 

OVERALL 61% 



if 



. an attractive, 
involving program 
without offering 
anything signifi- 
cantly new." 



76 124TGM TX 008:7-88 



VERSION UPDATE 



PLATOON 

Ocean 



ATARI ST £19.95 
PC: £19.95 

ALMOST six months after the 
anginal 8- tut games came out to a 
ertical reception comparable to 
(hat of the movie ITGMO03 C64 
92% . TGMQ04 Spectrum 84% ) the 
16-bil versions are finally 
appearing. The Atari ST and. as yet 
unseen Amiga, conversions are by 
Choke Software, while Nick 
Sheard has managed the PC 

V8T3IOnSOlO. 

Both games adhere closely to 



the original structure, with six 
distinct sections- The first has the 
player guiding a platoon member 
through a maze-like partem of 
jungle paths. While avoiding the 
gunfire and traps Ot the Viet Cong 
you must find the explosives 
required to blow up a bridge. The 
next level involves the platoon 
searching a village for essential 
equipment and a trapdoor. 

Section three Opens the 
trapdoor and gives you the 3-0 
point of view of a soldier in the 
VC's tunnel network. An 
'intelligent' cross-sighl allows you 
to move through the tunnels, shoot 
enemies when they appear and, m 
different circumstances, examine 
objects. Flares and a compass, 
should be collected to go on to 
section four where you emerge in 
a bunker. An enemy night attack 




Mor* colourful and sonic &ity pleasing (ft^n (ft* PC version although play slows 
rtottcaofy wfwn two or mors soldiers ttrv on-9crv*n - Atari ST«nwn 




Btrnaolh th* awful colour aehmma liaa a very good game - PC acr—rt 



must be fought off with some 
accurate shooting and judicious 
use of flares to illuminate the jungle 
when necessary. You may survive 
only to learn an American air stn ke 
is planned on your area of the 
jungle. A compass indicates the 
direction you are facing but it's up 
to you to find the correci way to a 
foxhole Unfortunalefy once there 
you find evil Sergeant Barnes 
hidden inside, determined thai no 
one else should share it with him. 
Five direct grenade his on the 
foxhole are necessary to save your 
platoon 

The PC version begins with a 
tune which would embarrass a 
Spectrum, but sound is 
subsequently rarely used, 
whereas I he Atari ST qame has 



continuous background music 
and suitably blood-curdling FX. 
Graphics on both machines are 
line although the STa are by far 
the best seen so far for this game 
- an EGA card option would have 
been nice for the PC. Ptatoon 
remains a tough game to play and 
the ftick- screen effect ot the PC 
adds nothi ng to aid your task The 
ST scrolls quite weH (although the 
game slows down dramatically 
when there are more than two 
soldiers on screen at one time) and 
high scores are thoughtfully saved 
io disk. Both versions should 
provide a long, hard slog before 
the final foxhole confrontation. 

PC: OVERALL «3% 
ATARI ST: OVERALL 90% 






CRACKING THE YOKE 



SONS OF LIBERTY 



SSI/US GOLD 



Turning from that ever- popular wargame subject, the 
American Civil War. SSI turn back to the end of the 
18th century and the war of American Independence, 
The newly emerging American colonials fought 
British troops in a bid to free their country from the British 
yoke. Sons Of Liberty uses the conflicts of Bunker Hill. 
Monmouth and Saratoga in this opportunity to change 
history. With over 50 strategy games under their webbing, 
the Caltfomia-based company is undoubtedly leaders in 
the (battte)f leld. 



You may control either side in any 
of the three scenarios, using either 
keyboard or joystick for the mam 
control functions and commands 
Each side controls infantry and 
cavalry with artillery providing the 
lacilrty for ranged combat. A non- 
Ndden/hidden movement option 
is offered together with three skill 
levels, basic, intermediate and 
advanced. Operation Points 
control the amount of moving, 
combat and other actions that 
units perform, 

Different ten-am affects point 
expenditure in movement, 
Ammunition levels can be 
redefined, reinforcement limes 
changed and handicaps placed on 



either side in the form ol difficulty 
levels Unil morale, efficiency and 
fatigue all play influential parts in 
the wargame. The intermediate 



level brings in additional functions 
including unit disruption, 

redefining unit formations, and a 
reconnaissance option, bne-of- 
sight rules also come into effect at 
this level. 

The advanced level includes 
options to build fortifications. 
command untta with their own 
individual leaders and use a 
Command Control rating based on 
a unit's current state, u also only 
awards a limited supply of 
ammunition. The Command 
Control rating determines a unit's 
strength and Ihe number of 
Operation Points available. 

Despile the fact that SSI are still 
using the block character graphics 
of hart a decade ago. Sons Of 
Liberty is a winner with its 
comprehensive strategic play and 
possibilities. 



Reviewing ttt* situation on th* ialand ot Bunker hill, looking tpwinfr Breed's 
Hid- Commodorw 94 *cr**n 




COMMODORE 64/128 

Diskette: £24,99 

Aa well as better 
presentation, what 
Liberty really needs to a 
reference card listing the 
commands - essential 
considering the number 
available te the player 
However, the game la what 
we have now come to expect 
from SSI, powerful strategy 
combined with an extensive 
array of commands to use 
end Implement. A pity SSI are 
still making tltti* use of the 
host machine's capabilities. 

OVERALL 77% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Sons Of Liberty Is to be 
r e lea s ed on disk for the Atari 
range of computers at £24.99 
along with a PC version 
priced at £29.99 



i* 



. powerful 
strategy with an 
extensive array of 
commands to 
use . 



*> 



TGW TX 008:7-8879/124 




DESOLATOR 



US GOLD 



The latest in the continuing wave of arcade 
conversions is probably unique in using an original 
name rather than the arcade game's. This conversion 
of Sega's Halls Of Kairos was programmed by 
Source Software, also responsible for Acttvision's 
Predator. 



Mac is a hemic young adventurer 
destined to fight his way through 
the halts of Kairos rescuemg 
kidnapped children hidden behind 
the castle's mirrors. Punching 
shields breaks the power of 
mirrors releasing the children 
trapped inside. Once a sufficient 
number of infants have been 
collected. Mac transforms into 
Macho Man And with his boosted 
strength desolates' all in his path. 
Such magical transformations are 
vital in a struggle with an enemy as 
great as Lucifer himseii 

BIG MAC FRIES 

Des&at or begins with Mac having 
just entered the enemy's territory 




which is segmented by numerous 
walls - these can be crossed by 
pushing open doors, punching 
down flimsy barriers and 
teleportirtg via warp tiles- Trying to 
prevent you reaching the final level 
is a hrxde of villains ranging from 
zombie- 1 ike Henchmen lo Firemen 
who hud fireballs and Armor who 
throws swords. Your fists can 
destroying them, but weapons 
such as bombs (Spectrum) or 
boomerangs (CG^Amstrad) may 
be found to mora easily dispatch 
your foes, Alternatively Mac can 
do forward flips to pass by 
especially powerful opposition, 

Scattered along your bloody 
route are money bags and 



VERSION UPDATE 



BEYOND THE ICE 



Elite Systems 



Spectrum Cassette: £8.99 

Diskette: £12,99 

THE wise old spirits have 
thoughfully shot a sacred arrow 
into the air and decreed that the 
person finding it will be the one 
chosen to destroy the evil 
presence that now engulfs the 
land beyond the Ice Palace The 
game was fully reviewed in 
TGM0O7 
Bold and colourful sprites, a 



snaz title tune and neat sound 
effects make this an enfoyabte 
seek -and -destroy game. The 
layout of the various obstacles, as 
well as I he ferocity of the denizens, 
will challenge all but the mosi 
skilled of joystick wieiders - 
practice »s recommended. Overall 
a very playable addition to the 
Grto$t$ 'n' Goblins genre. 

SPECTRUM: 
OVERALL 75% 



Finding the **crw*fmrrQW '* enough to amndyoumO of * qoiv 



Mmc Wfl/ifs r»9 wmy through Kmiro* '* hordm* to frrm tftm pftrtdtwri - *m« r»d 



confrontation win Kairo's 
endlessly multiplying, fVe- 
breeihing heads ft you manage lo 
destroy all the heads it's on to Ihe 
next level - and load 



question marks that turn your 
enemies into treasure chests - 
even the fire- spitting dears' heads 
can be turned 10 your advantage. 
At the end of each level there is a 



Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette: £14.99 

Incorporating much bolder 
colours than the C64, gives It 
a more cheerful If somewhat 
less evocative took. As on the 
C64. progress i* perhaps s 
little too easy, although one 
improvement la a panel on 
the left showing how close 
Mac is to finishing the game. 
Another unique feature of 
this version la a flickscreen 
rather than scrolling 
presentation - fortunately 
this doesn't affect gemepiay. 
Sound Is similarly effective, 
but limited to sparse FX to 
ha|p make this only en 
average game, 

OVERALL 63% 



SPECTRUM 

Cassette: £8.99 
Diskette: £12.99 

Purely monochromatic, this 
version compensates with a 
more detailed, realistic 3-D 
effect. The satisfaction of 
sending the solid-looking 
enemies flying is much 
better than on other 
versions, but during the end- 
of-levei confrontation with 
the heads, spotting the 
fireballs is harder, making 
success that much difficult - 
if not Impossible. 12BK 
owners benefit from a single- 
load game, even so this 
arcade conversion never 
realty stands out from Ihe 
crowd. 

OVERALL 67% 




COMMODORE 64/128Cassette: £9.99 
Diskette: £14,99 

Like the Amstrad game, this version sacrifices detail for colour. 
It works quite well. If a little blandly, and with the characters 
smaller than on the Spectrum there's more room to manoeuvre, 
making it po sai bk» to progress merely by avoiding enemies. This 
slight flaw affects cassette owners more as it brings up the multi- 
load that much quicker. Nevertheless the smoothness of the 
scrolling and a reasonable in-game tune help make it ail a 
generally enjoyable, if nut remarkable conversion. 



OTHER FORMATS 

An ST version with several added features is expected at El 9.99, 



tt 



. . generally enjoyable, if not 
remarkable conversion" 



An 
tvi 

the 

flOl 

Ret 

of 

Roc 

com 
enei 

has 

distil 
rathe 
aHu 

Franl 
MfM 



REVIEWS 



I SPIDER ROBOT IN 





ARAC 



PC LEISURE/PRISM LEISURE 



Originally an 8- bit release on the Commodore 64/1 28 
in late 1986, Arac was released in America in the Epyx 
Maxx Out! series as Spiderbot The game has been 
licensed back from Epyx and re teased in the UK 
through PC Leisure (a new subsidiary of Prism Leisure), 
The PC version being written by FACS Entertainment 
Software. 



Things are going horribly wrong in 
the electronic (ungte. Three 
nuclear reactors in the nearby 
Giadei are going critical and 
unless shut down, the jungle Is 
going to permanently glow In tha 
dark 

Arac the robot, armed only wiih 
a net. enters the Citadel to try to 



atop the meiidown - 30 real-lime 
minutes away. The Citadel is 
Guarded by plasma boM- firing 
robots and with only a net to help 
Jum Arac has hie work cut out. 
Fortunately, he Is capable of 
transforming into Spiderbot, a 
radioactive bolt -firing 

arachmdrotd. He does ihis by 



Arte my brain tor m cmpl/on - thm fivoic &oidrnitk*9 m rmt to**, pmrhsps ft* 
should utilise Spiderbot modm 



finding and attaching to himself 
two robotic legs and a power 
generator Arac can only run 
trundle through the complex and 
spring up onto low ledges while 
Spiderbot can scuttle along floors 
and hang from ceilings. In some 
screens, the ceiling is the only way 
to progress. 

SMARTIE WEB 

By ihrowmg the net at various 
creatures inhabiting the Citadel, 
Arac can store them in his portable 
cage for use when needed, Once a 
creature is released from the cage, 
it will, in return for its freedom, 
perform a specific task. The Rock 
Hopper opens the Fist needed to 
activate Spiderbot, the Stinger 



helps Arac reach high ledges. Big 
Borer gnaws through walls, the 
Ray blinds snooping Citadel radar 
and the Man of War fuses 
electronics opponents. Some of 
the creatures dram Arac's energy 
on contact - caged creatures 
escape if Arac's energy is loo low. 
Energy is also tost by falling down 
deep holes, taking fire from robot 
guards or by staying loo long in 
energy-draining Sptderbol mode. 
Lose ail energy and the game 
finishes in defeat. 

Arac can be played either as a 
full or short game, with the robot 
having to atari from scratch in the 
former, or, in the latter, begin with 
the Spiderbot already assembled 
and a few creatures trapped m the 
cage 




PC 

Diskette: £9,99 

The traits of the PC strike again with the familiar limitation of four 
colours on screen (CGA is the only colour mode catered forj, 
abysmal sound and equally dire graphics. The action is standard 
platf orms-and-ladders. but it has the simple appeal common to 
many games of this type. White Starqua^" {reviewed in TOM 007) 
had speed and action, •'■• , is more sedate- Little pressure Is 
placed on the player and it's all very uninspiring both graphically 
and in play. The Spiderbot mode and the puzzles make it more of 
an arcade adventure than most and as such it Is enjoyable and 
absorbing, if a tittle tired looking. 

OVERALL 60% 



OTHER FORMATS 

Amiga and Atari ST versions are scheduled tor r e lease around 
November at £f 2,99 each. 



. . . enjoyable and absorbing ..." 



VERSION UPDATE 



ROCKFORD-THE 
ARCADE GAME 

Melbourne House 



Amiga: £1999 

TWO months after conversions for 
the ST and PC (review in TGM0O6), 
Rockfotd is here for the Amiga. 
Retaining the much-copied basics 
of the Bouktatdash game. 
Rock'ord scurries around 
collecting objects, avoiding 
enemies and manipulating various 
magical items. The arcade game 
has Rockford exchanging his 
distinctly bug- like features for 
rather more human ones, playing 
a Hunter, Spaceman and even Dr 
Frankenstein on the game's five, 
selectable worlds. Each world is 



made up of four levels consisting 
of approximately four screens in 
size packed with brain-teasing 
puzzles to be completed within a 
time limit. 

This version has some superb 
tunes and sound FX, improved 
graphics with a more subtle use of 
colour and a new. pseudo-3-D 
affect - but it is probably best 
distinguished by the super- 
smooth scrolling, Nevertheless 
presentation remains a great deal 
less than one would expect of an 
arcade game, while changes to the 
graphics, in favour of some tacky 
new ones - such as the cook 




Th* httch+nt of Kyssmndrm are obviously too much tor ftockforg 



collecting apples while being 
chased by hamburger- snakes - 
have removed much of the 
original's appeal- Underneath the 
graphics, however, gameplay is 



virtually unchanged and is well 
worth a look if you're not already 

an addict 

AMIGA: OVERALL 70% 



TGM TX 008:7-6601/124 



Your plane has ditched 

on e mountainot m 

plateau somewhere in 

deepest Tibet. You and 

your oornpenians are 

alive but recovery from 

the impact is short-lived 

- a targe shape is moving j 

towards you, as it gets 

closer vou rub your eyes | 

n disbelief* a Dinosaur! - 

where are you, .and 
whan? Now you leem to 

survive in a world 

untouched by modem 

- a world frozen in 

time Stunning graphics 

and startling action in 

this thriHing innovative 

game. 



{ 



*£■ 







ARMvMOv 




£19 

EAC 



Ocean Software Limited * 6 Central Street ■ Manchester ■ M2 5NS i >phc 



J 



!-■-■ 



CO 
LU 










The Award winning film 
by Civer Stone has bean 
sturr wrgty transcribed to 

the software 

entertainment medium 

creating a Blockbuster 

Computer Game. Hailed 

as the "Beat Rm Tie-in to 

date" - the program has 

received brilliant reviews 

on all formats Special 

txixed pack containing a 

FREE film poster, game 

picture and audio 

cassette of Smokey 

Robinson's classic song 

Tracks of my Tears" 



T 



•4Mbi*-^t. 






I 





s m 



Eons have passed ... vet 

desprte apparent 

annihilation m the origins 

ARKANQlDgeme: 

DifrienBicin-controling 

fbrce "DOH - has come 

back to life, and 

occupying the huge 

space-craft ZARG. has 

entered our Universe. 

ARKANOID type specs- 

fighter Ml XTECnj» 

through long forgotten 

computer data until it 

finds the answer to this 

threat 'VAUS2"te 

launched and speeds 

towarde the threatening 

alien presence, befbre it 

can extract ita revenge... 

-The Revenge of Don" 




IS • Titahone: 061 832 BB33 ■ Telex; 669977 OC. 



G Fax: 061 834 0650 




Pack your suitcases we're off on a whist lestop tour 
around the globe to see where the major home com- 
puters are most popular 



SI 



compiled by RICHARD EDDY 



*r£lOver in the 
OtOHStates the Sega 

is immensely popular 
and gave the company 
a turnover of CS50 mil- 
lion last year which 
represents a tot of 
Master Systems, Car- 
tridges and other 
peripherals Canada s 
also proving 9 good 
business ground for 
Sega - just as 11 is for 
TGM 



rth a growing mar- 
ket or STs in this 
country it's already the 
most popular 1 6-brt 
home micro around. By 
the end of the year Atari 
hope to Shift another 
100.000 units (even 
though the price has 
' risen by £50.) 



UllfTrie 

I HBros 



Super Mario 
are now 
bouncing across 

roughly 5 million Nin- 
tendo consoles in the 
States at the moment 
Going by sates charts it 
is the biggest selling 
'toy'. British -made soft- 
ware is at Number f end 
Number 7 now [Rare'a 
Pro-Am Racer and 
Wizards And warriors,\ 



Atari distrfcute the 
ST globally and 
you' 11 even find it on sate 
in the Caribbean (on the 
shelf next to the sun tan 
lotion) and in the States 
it's selling reasonably, 
though receives less | 
support than rt does in 
Britain 



JiDUHome of the 
UUfVlrange. Commo- 
dores have always been 
popular - the Amiga 
appears 10 have 
squashed the Atari ST 
and along witn IBM PC 
is the most popular 16- 
brt machine going. Soft- 
ware is disk -based, 
cassettes t\ov«f hap- 
pened, A deal of UK 
software is licensed 10 
major US publishers. 
recently Thtng Bounces 
Back (Gremlin 

Graphics), dubbed Coil 
Cop and Prism's Arac 
(US title: Spiderbof) 
wenttoEPYX 




tv 



p Jin Germany the ST is 
Via popular machine 

and Atan is due to give rt 
a bigger push this year 
vnth a target sates figure 
ol another 400,000 units 
by the end of 1988. Sup 
port is high with several 
software houses [Rain- 
bow Arts ) and 
magazine coverage in 
Happy Computer. 
Power Play and ST 
Magaan, L 



the 
Spectrum 
remains mainly a 
Bntish-only machine. 
Spanish and Portugese 
markets me doing well. 
Though there is Jitt le evi- 
dence of Portugese 
software houses, Spain 
gets some attention 
over here from Dinamic 
which licenses its prod- 
ucts \Army Moves, 
Game Over to imagine. 




O) 



1 CPC 



PQpSpain. France and 
UiUGerrnany provide 
Amstrad with the 
biggest European mar 
kets outside the UK ■ 
Vorsprung Diirch 

Schneider as Ihey say 
because Schneider is 
the name of the 
Amstrad machines for 
our European chums 
Similar support to the 
ST from software 
houses such as Ere 
informatique [French 
Get Dexter(s) ], Lonciels 
[French - Super Sk>\ 
Rainbow Arts [German 
- Bad Cat. Groat Giann 
Sisters] and Dinamic 
[Spam - Army Moves 
Game Over' 



The third most 
popular 8-bfl 

micro m the UK has 
found a faithful, steady 
user base. Amstrad 
oiler no sales figures, 
but deny rumours about 
axing the CPC range 
Though software sup- 
port rides high, wrthout 
essential European 
sales, the CPC coukJ 
lose on the converson 
side 



CO LP Since its appear - 
dr Olence in '82, the 
ZX Spectrum Is the 
most popular 8- bit 
home micro in the UK. 
Amstrad remain coy 
about current sates 
figures for the +2 and 
* 3, but they have top- 
ped the million mark. A 
good sate of + S disk 
software is reckoned 10 
be about 1 000- plus 
units. 



84/1 24 TGM TX 008:7-88 



ni|p Because of global 
lit Udistnbution the 
Amstrad CPC, In its 
many guises, is found in 
some odd places - and 
Chile is a very odd place 
indeed, Nearer to home, 
they are also found m 
Poland and Gibralta. 






FEATURE 



EV^HKS 





flbke the jk. Alan 
Item 10 sea 100.000 
STs rrto France before 
Dicember Good sup- 
with French soft- 
companies such 
Ere informauque, 
lloriDeis and Fsei - 
bus! cii their gamns are 
toverhare. 



DDUItaly is the most 
popular BBC base in 
Europe, with sales of 
£1.25 million in 1987, 
The rest of Europe pro- 
vided a tidy £2.69 mil- 
lion in all. 



C£» 



|| PW Japan is where 
mo A the MSX is at the 
height of its popularity 
with an estimated 2 mil- 
lion units doing the 
rounds - O* which 
500,000 are MSX Us 
Games sell by the ton- 
load and are all car- 
tndgn/dish based 



INGDOM 
IY 



OE^HThB Sega range 

uEBfthas been availa- 
ble in the UK for a year 
now and since its 
launch has turned over 
£5 miliion - and that 
figure is increasing by 
the day. In the rest of 
Europe it's popular in 
France and Germany. 



\ 



APAN 



iYPT 



yOVAfter Japan 
IfluASpam has the 
next largest share of 
MSX users - in fact of all 
the computers owned in 
Spam 40% are part of 
the MSX range. France 
comes a close third, but 
in the UK we are trailing 
behind - wotcha wait- 
ing for guys?" 



DDP As you may have 

Dob 




iguessed the UK is 
where the biggest base 
of Acorn/BBC 

machines can be found 
"Vln their many varieties 
[Electron, S8C-B, BBC- 
Master, Master Com- 
pact, Archimedes.) And 
the company whistled 
to a tuna of Eza.&million 
in sales East year, 



p pro Not a 



booming 
market. but 

Bpoctrurns are in evi- 
dence in Egypt and Sn 

Lanka, May be of use in 
camel control but you'd 
probably get the hump. 



frj SRI LAfil 



inp Doing great guns 
DDu in Australia, mainly 
as an educational 
machine, with sales at 
around £1.7 mi«on. 
Meanwhile, >t you're in 
the Far East and have 
bought a BBC machine 
you've contributed to 
the £1.82 million sales 
figure 




• MAURITIUS 



o. 



MM Commodore 

■Wl machines. all 
■nineties find firm bases 
bgm which to sell and 
tfiatKish a solid user 
base In Europe you'll 
fifttl the highest nu m ber 
Commodore 

racfunes in the UK, 

Franc*, Spam, and Ger- 
many. Worldwide sales 
o) the Commodore are 
in excess of 9.5 million 
units with 600.000 of 
those being Armgas - 
lie largest European 
Amga market is Ger- 
iwny. Meanwhile, here 
in the UK Amsga safes 
« approximately 
«.O0O units 



L 



small 
miles 



pnp There's a 
urlfisland 350 

east of M 
called Mauritius. II was 
discovered in the 7th 
Century and is now an 
independent state in the 
British Gommonwearth. 
it has a tropicaJ climate 
and is frequently struck 
by cyclones. And if 
you're on holiday there 
you'll be pleased to 
know that the Amstrad 
CPC is on saie there. 



P CM The Sega has 
dLOHjust bean 

launched m Australia - 
presentiy dominated by 
Commodore and BBC 
machines - SO no infor- 
mation to report from 
down under. However 
there is a cult following 
of the Sega range in 
Hong Kong - simply 
because it's made 
there 



pOll Commodore hrrs 
uD fila reasonably suc- 
cessful cult following 
down under, but more 
recentfy the Commo- 
dore 64/126 and Amiga 
have really taken off - 
especially in the New 
Zealand market. Com- 
modore was unable to 
provide any figures but 
said, modestly, that 
they were pleased'. 
Most software is 
imported and has a very 
high price point. 




TGM TX 008:7-8885/124 




It's the biggest, most extravagant computer 
game in the world, up to 45 can play at one time 
and it takes you beyond the Moon to Jupiter. 
Marshal M Rosenthal reports on the latest 
Shuttle flight from Canada . . . 

The CN Tower in Toronto, Canada, is the largest free-standing 
structure in the world. You look up at it and say, 'So what, big 
deal, who cares? ' But there's more to this needle in the sky than 
meets the eye. Inside are the usual everyday shops and 
restaurants* with one exception; Tour Of The Universe, Instead 
of bu ying lunch, how's about flying to the stars? 

— urchasing a ticket to visit Juprtef THE D7ftNF TAP 1 

seems a bargain - only $1 0.95! ' """ «*-""■- "^ 

The Startour idem is plastic. Airports have come a long way since 

with holographic writings thai my lime. There are a variety of exhibits 

seem to pop off the surface, that include, among others. 

There is also a magnetic strip which Milestones In the Conquest ot Space, 



seem to pop off the surface, that include, among others. 

There is atso a magnetic strip which Milestones in the Conquest ot Space, 

has been encoded with my name (talfc There are also displays of computers, 

about Big Brother.) The attendant strange devices from other galaxies. 

pieces the ticket in a plastic sleeve as wefl as a hodgepodge of space 



and loops it around my neck 
i am then attowed to enter the 



paraphernalia. Most impressive of aH 
is the Murtivision display, This 



Transition elevator along with a occupies an entire waif and is made 

number of fellow passengers. The up of 64 cokx monitors, They can 

domed lights dim with each shake as work together as a grid to display a 

we begin our 1500- tool descent single image, or segment a variety of 

below the surface. An invisible hand visuals at the same time. Images are 

s ee ms to give me a gen tie push on the displayed about upcoming nights, 



head as the elevator groans to a stop, 
and tne doors open onto the year 
2019. 

A guard dad in black and silver 
greets us as we queue up before the 
turnstile of Security Scan. A digital 
voice instructs me to insert my ticket 



interesting facts, even adverts 

Our flight number is finally called 
over the PA system Passport Input 
prompts me to again insert my ticket 
and then answer various questions 
presented on a touch screen. This 
information is also sent down into the 



into the glowing slot An overhead Central Scruhniser computer, I then 
light then comes on as the voice enter the tunnel that leads into the 
states mat my height and weight are inoculation area. 



now being recorded. Additionally, my 
psycho-spmtual state is also being 
viewed, A monitor glows, displaying 
my face swathed in a myriad of pastel 
colours The votes returns and informs 



I envision hideously white-garbed 
fiends spraying me with foul liquids in 
their attempts to disinfect my body of 
earthly germs. Instead, a pleasant 
young woman In a lab coat positions 



me thai I may pass into the main me on a pedestal and inserts my ticket 
concourse. The holding bar swings into a wail slot. I jerk a bd as three ruby 



away and I walk through. 



at O9& Tour wWSnp 



lasers converge their beams 
pajnlesily on my body. At the same 
time a zap of ozone, as fine a fine mist 
as you could imagine, envelopes me 
from head lo toe. Trial wasn t bad at 



A* * A^ « A* ' A* * *T* • A* ■ •A* 
« A* * A* * A* • 4* ■ A* • '4* ■ -t* ■ A* 
■ A*- 4V 4*' **■ •**' ***■ **' A% 



A** A* 



I walk down the gangway and grve 
another attendant my ticket. Ha 
inserts it into a computer, and shortly 
hands me a paper documem 
containing all of tne information about 
me since I first signed up for the fight 
The documem also contains my 
offwortd passport, earthpori 
disembarkation card and visa to 
Jupiter I thank him and sit down to 
await boarding {some things never 
change,) 



GATEWAY TO THE 
STARS 

It's lime. The airlock doors open with 
a hydraulic burst of power, and we 
walk U ■ uugh a darkened corridor and 
onto the shuttle. I srt down m a heavdy 
padded and cushioned fight seat and 
fasten my seal harness An attendant 
checks for any kind of p rob l em and. 
seeing none, leaves. The shuttle 
doors rush together with a loud 
'thank 1 . Escape hatchways are within 
easy sight, but let's hope they wont 
be needed. Mutwrt instrument panels 
and control devices go about the* 
duties mysteriously as we ftoget in our 
seals. 

Two video monitors, one at either 
edge of the dosed front viewscreen. 
come to life A repr e sen ta tive for CP 
Air Interplanetary welcomes us 
aboard, A moment later, the Captain 
switches into the monitor and 
introduces himself: Ladies and 
Gentlemen. Cyborgs and Clones, we 
are about to launch, on our way to visit 
the planet Jupiter. You are flying on 
the new Hermes Class IV MBC 
Shuttle, which is fully equipped for 
deep space flight 11 also has the 
revolutionary Helix catapult 
mechanism - mora about that later. 
Takeoff will be accomplished through 
the use of magnetic linear attraction, 
and we hope you enjoy your flight/ 

The monitors switch to outside 

■ ■ ■ 1 — ami. **- — — ■■■il — in#Mi ■ — — — - ■ 3 — - 

cameras as me protective' covering 
over the front viewscreen rots back. 
We now see the inside of the shuttle 
launch bay. and there is a lurch as our 
craft begins to move into position for 
takeoff. During this short process, we 
can see various other shuttles 
awaiting their lum, as wen as the huge 
cavern that houses them. 

Our position is secured, and we tilt 
upward towards the open bay doors. 
A second later we're rising wrth a 
"Swoosh' akin to a Supersonic soap 
bubble as we flash through the 
stratosphere and into a flawless earth 
orbit. Ahead of us. the stars twinkle an 
shins as thrustars fire to take us to 
'. the first manned city in 
space. Gateway looms ahead of us. 
spinning gracefully as it maintains it 
position relative to the earth 

Our craft is hailed by Gateway 
Control, and we slow to position 
inside of the Catapult. The Captain 
comes on to tell us that we will soon 
be using the Helix's faster -than- light, 
nearly instantaneous technique to 
transport us to Jupiter. 

JUPITER MISSION 

The Go signal la given and we pick up 
speed. The fr am e wo rk of spiral plates 
blur around us and seam to change 
into a crazed kaleidoscope of ripping 



•gfer Like a roNer coaster gong 
down, we more faster end fester. 
Suddenly, amidst a rush of while 
none, the universe blanks out - and 

majestic Jupiter blossoms on the 
horizon 

Our shuttle paeees w the 
landscape from nukes up, as we gaze 
down into the awesome red spectacle 
of the planet. We move on and sjoni 
amdst Ctwrto, lo and other Jovian 

(ROOM. 

The return tnp is uneventful. We 
feme normal space and appear at 
Gateway. Our Captain comes on the 
intercom and points out landmarks as 
•m are drawn back into the earth's 
atmosphere, and towards the CN 
Tomer, Landing once again, the 
shuffle is returned to the staging ante 
iind wedrsemberfc, 

Leaving the craft, we pass by a 
series of huge 3*5-toot holograms 
fixtofsTg the virtues of science end 
technology. 

Bui what would any spaceport be. 
without a gift shop? The corridor exits 
mo a gWtenng and exerting world of 
soentifc gifts and gadgets. Not to 
mention an sv Blanche of souvenirs. 
Managing to escape with a tew dollars 
left, I enter another transition elevator 
which returns me to 1988 

SOUND OF SPACE 

WARNWG: Read no further rl you 



don't wish to have your fantasies 
shattered by the cow truth ot hi-tech. 
As you might have guessed, the 
shuttle trip was not real, but a highly 
accurate and absorbing simulation 
lhal took four years and $1 
GNtfli. 

Showacan Is the system 
creates the illusion of space i 
was developed by 
Trurnbul. film director and i 
of special effects for such films as 
200 f A Space Odyssey, Star Wars 
and Oose Encounters Of The Third 
Kind A chillingly accurate film i 
space and space effects is rear 
protected onto the shuttles forwarc 
viewing screen at 60 frames a second. 
This is two and half times faster thar 
normal and looks similar lo what fin 
human eye expects as if observes the 
reel world. The 70mm large format is 
co m bi ne d with a high level of 
brightness, and an expanded view 
which creates the smazmg ft ' 
reality it's helped by a four 
digital sound track which e 
from speakers placed strat _ 
around and outside the shuttle The 
fUm Images are interlinked by 
computer with the shuttle itself. 

Actually, the shuttle is a motion 
picture house that fhes. Pilots tram on 
sophisticated devices that ii 
actual aircraft - simulators 

Simulators act and react just like the 
aircraft does in flight . the machine 



sw«r 



tthttxxtrot 
i doth* job 



4lmosf M# art ordkify 



rests upon a set of hydraute: lifts which 
move it m the various ways thai the 
craft it is imitating would be like when 
up in the air. Computers, of course, 
control the mo v ements, as well as 
duplicate the many events which can 
occur, Frying a simulator n |ust Nke 
the reel thing, but you never leave the 
ground. 

Tour's simulator is designed by lEi 
systems and seats 40-45 people, fl's 
been specialty adapted to react fust 
Use a reel space craft. Forward and 
lateral movements, as weB as such 
things as pitch, roll and yaw, happen 
m conjunction with the images on- 
screen, Believe me though, when 
- *re power diving towards the 
in. your stomach doesn't think it's 
just a movie. 

CP Air Imerplaneiary plans other 
trips aa well, with new planets and 
ixies to explore already under 
etapment They've even got 
another shuttle ready to go when i he 
^ offwortd tourist season star 

of us get nervous fust 
on a tan ladder. But if you 
; to set your sights high. Iry Tour 
Universe, 



INTERACTIVE ENTERTAINMENT 




577 Jmrvtt Strmot. Toronto. Ontario 

TOUR OF THE UNIVERSE RATES 

ADULTS $10 95 Canadian 
CHILDREN UNDER 12 (4.00 
Canadian 



When not operating hi* commercial 
ph otog r a phy studio In New York, 
hal HI Rosenthal isa journalist 
number of domestic and 
~] publications dealing in 
', video and high 



TGM TX 008:7-8887/124 



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BOARD GAMES 



GOING 




After a short holiday boardgames are back, 
and this month we test the qualities of the 
game of the 'year* - 88 and whip up a 
sandstorm with Piremiti In the land of the 
ancients. But first, switch your mood to 
lewd, here's the risque news 

SUMMER [S] EXPLOITS 



If you don 't possess an open 
mmd at the moment make 
sure it's unlocked in time lor 
three mid-summer releases 
not intended for the 
sensitive, Ardent boardgame 
producers PMll Uumond Gam** 
nave yet another licensed product 
to add to their growing range - 
Wicked Willie the board game. 

The cheeky six-inch star of 
many books and T-shirts makes 
his appearance in a race-round- 
tne- board game in a quest to 
reach the women's apartment. 
Helping Willie are the players who 
collect virility cards to keep up his 
strength, there are questions to be 
answered, challenges to 
Overcome and STD clinics to make 
sure the little lad is pure. However. 



as Paul Lamond's publicity 
department informed Ls, It's quite 
moral realty . . , each player has 
to collect a condom or they 
can't . . . er, complete the game.' 
Wicked Wiflie the boardgame goes 
on general release in late-juiy. 

After playing around with 
WiCk&d Willie you may become so 
deranged you will be in need of 
help, so it's just as well that MB 
Games are releasing Therapy 
this summer. Therapy is aimed at 
the adult market and takes players 
along a humorou s journey through 
life, Dealing with growing pains 
and examining the human psyche 
are achieved by answenng 
probing questions. That wacky 
Chappie Kenny Everett is 
advertising the game on your TV 



»fl 



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r *WCTlONS 



screens soon, stay tuned . . . 

If you can make words work the 
latest offering from Serif may be 
of interest. Verbositi is Ihe name 
of the quick-thinking cardgame 
where players turn over seven 
randomly picked cards each 
bearing an initial and have three 
minutes to concoct sentences on 
subjects such ss sex, halitosis and 
synchronised swimming. As Serif 
explain. ■ verbose is the new game 
which encourages outlandish 
thinking while exposing warped 
minds.' Well, liters are enough 
warped minds around here at the 
moment without exposing my 
more thankyouverymuch, 

88 DIGITAL 
DILEMMA 

I PL, around £10, 2-4 players 

First exhibited at the Ideal 
Home Exhibition on stand 
2020 - House Of The F ulure 
(T<3 MOOT). 88 Digital 
Dilemma was described by 
Professor Walker of the Royal 
College Of Art as the game of the 
future'. It's unusual in as much as 
there is no central playing board - 
each player has their own. 

The 88 box comes complete 
with four playing boards, number 
cards and yellow 'digital' chips. 
The objective is to pick a two-digit 
number (the objective number) 
and attempt to recreate it. or 
numerically as close as possible, 
on the playing board by moving 
Ihe chips. 

The interesting factor is that the 
objective number has to be 
created by performing one of four 
moves with the digrtal chips left on 
the board from a previous round, 
The four moves $tq jumble - 
move chips already on the board 
but not add or subtract any, add 
chips - add but not move any. 
subtract chips - take away chips 
but not move any, or do nothing 
The winner is the first person to 
create the obiectrve number ten 
times. 

THf KMXCr 

Bit of a brain drainer this one and 
no! so good on the amusing 
entertainment value s»de. The idea 
is a clever one and if you're in the 
mood for tactical thinking it works 
well However, for the average 
games player it may prove 
repetitive and slow. 



PIREMID 

Egyptian Enterprises, £24,95, 
2-4 players 




_ s with many computer 

games at the moment, 

Lm presentation is one of the 

^\ most important boardgame 

factors, and Piremtd is an 

excellent example, with clearly 

marked board and 170 playing 

pieces, It has taken 1 8 months to 

design the game involves the 

journey of four sarcophagi - one 

per player - through the lands of 

Egypt. The playing board is in a 

spiral shape - the objective is to 

reach the centre and build your 

pyramid 

Traveling on the roll Of a die 
takes players through a crty, a 
quarry, up the Nile and across the 
desert. To make the passage 
safety, talents (money) and staves 
(people) need to be accumulated 
to buy a boat (for the Nile) and sand 
sledges (desert?), Both staves and 
talents can be acquired by tr 
- for anything players have to 
trade* 

The boa/d is evenly scattered 
with hazards and pot -luck 
squares, there are sun squares 
(good luck|, cobra squares (baa- 
a-d luck) and God squares (make 
bad luck good.) To build a pyramid 
each player must have five 
matching building cards and it's a 
mad race to complete 
construction. 



For all Piremitfs wonderful playing 
pieces, the game itself lacks any 
real payability and energy to keep 
going through long games. Much 
of the game is down to luck, 
leaving little room for tactical 
playing or devious trading. It's 
nice, but not that nice , . , 



H 



NEW LABELS, OLD 
LABELS, NEWE 
COMPANIES 



On page 94 we look at the hype In the name; 
here, John Gilbert examines how the name of 
the game may be In the change In the name 

The software industry is burgeoning under a wealth of strong 
product, colourful advertising campaigns and high public 
awareness. It's helped along by a support group of magazines 
such as THE GAMES MACHINE and television programs which 
directly or indirectly use computer graphics and arcade games, 

I is a market which is beholden promote identities such as Rainbow 



Tto The big companies Such as 
Ocean and US Gotd, and where 
money and contacts are 
Important if you want to 
succeed Fortunately, though, the 
market pool hasn't stagnated. Biq 
companies are capable of coming up 
with new labels and concepts to give 
the industry ■ fresh face despite the 
lack of any new blood, or OTmpanies. 
on the scene 

Until recently the 'new label ' has 
been the province of record and 
budget software industries. Look 
behind such gems as Music For 
Pleasure, Melbourne House and the 
old Activision (itself renamed 
Mechagenic J and you will Imd 
biggies such as Thorn, EMI and 
Mastertrome. New labels, new titles, 
even new managements . . , 

GO! FORTH AND 
MULTIPLY 

There are three main reasons why a 
major software publisher would wanl 
to diversify operations into another 
label. First is financial most labels are 
Limited companies in their own right, 
should they fail, trie directors of the 
master company are not liable to 
creditors, though, as preferential 
creditors of their own subsidiary, any 
resulting money from the failure can 
be paid back to the main firm. 

Second: a publisher involved in 
arcade games may decide to get into 
adventures but doesn't want to be 
Inked to those products by its arcade 
fans. Also, companies such as US 
Gold have differing product ranges 
which will have differently advertised 
images. US Gold used solely 10 ship 
software from the States, but now 
does a lot ol game conversion work in 
Britain. It's GO! label got back to the 
American image with games mainly 
for the 16-brt market- For them the 
new label, l dairy divorced from the 
parent company, was the answer . . . 
now even that has changed, current 
thinking suggests ft would be better to 



Arts rather than the GO! image so 
directly. Names come, names go . . . 
Third is tfnage protection, used by 
many high-ranking companies: 
onginally they either regarded 
computer games as a frivolous - 
though profitable - sideline or who 
already had a booming industrial 
software business putting out 
databases, communications 

packages Or word processors. One 
such national concern was British 
Telecom which first regarded games 
publishing as an interesting prospect 
but didn't want it connected to the BT 
image. 

OUT OF THE FRYING 
PAN 

Firebird, the budget label, was the 
first-born shortly followed by parent 
company Tetecomsotl and finally the 
flainWrd adventure imprint Both 
tmpnnts have boomed while 
managing to keep their identities 
separate 

Since its formation, however. 
Firebird has undergone a 
transformation which has just been 
rationalised by publisher Paul 
Hibbard It started 10 put out full-price 
games such as Elite and Bubble 
Bobbie, introduced a Firebird Budget 
at a mid-price point and created 
Firebird Silver to take on the tow, 
£1 .99 range. 

Confused? Welt, the publishers at 
Tetecomsoft thought you mighi be 
and have just put the finishing touches 
to a new image - labelled Silverbird 

They say the reason for the 
ret ormation was not sotety a matter ol 
pncepomt mdentification with a 
particular label - « Firebird Silver at 
D 99 - but. rather, thai the Firebird 
label was in danger of losing its brand 
ideniity 

To make sure that no confusion 
occurs the Fire- and Silverbird logos 
take up most of the newly designed 
cassette cover formats and a colour 
coding system is used to show what 



sort of games are on offer. Silvertwd 
products, with titles such as Beech 
Boggy Simulator, Stunt B*k*> 
Simulator, Egg Head, Skateboard 
Kids and The European Football 
Crtarnptcmhips will retail at CI .99. 

The general standard of the 
Silverbird games is as high as you will 
find in any budget range. Egghead, for 
instance, is a colourful platforms- an d# 
ladders game in which you become a 
motherless egg which needs to hatch. 
You musl keep warm artificially, using 
items, such as an infra-red heater, 
which can be found on a trip around 
your wohd. Transport's provided by 
means of teteport or swappers « 
which don't guarantee destinations, 
while chargers. ULA chips, a helmet, 
parachute and rocket might help you 
-or not. 

Siniiarty, Oh No! - at the higher 
price of £2.99 - puts you down in the 
latter part ol Earth's history where a 
great deal of cowjackmg goes on. The 
cows are protected by transparent 
spheres but. ultimately, it's up to you 
m your cattle rangers' craft, to stop 
rustlers nicking your herd. 

Further up the straight budget-once 
scale. Silverbird is doing things with 
the Atan ST I, Bali, priced at £9.95 is 
the 16-bit conversion of the hit game 
involving the rescue of your spherical 
pats from the grips of the evil Terry 
Ball. Struggling through 16 security- 
conscious zones, there's only a 
bubble gun lor comfort, and as you 
pass each zone you gam a set of super 
devices, such as turbo boost, a 
horizontal laser, a Rainbow ripple 
laser and a laser cooling unit. 

Firebird, meanwhile will com in Lie its 
£4,99 mid-price budget range 
products with games Farm Light 
(reviewed this issue) and Wrus. out in 
June. According to Firebird, the 
quality Of mid-pnce range will be 
markedly better than the low-price 
and could be equaled with full-priced 
games. 



SPECIAL EFFECTS 

Ocean, biggest of the software 
industry's deep sea fish, also 
launched a label, though its founders 
are outside rather than inside the 
parent company. Special FX, formed 
by former Ocean man Paul 
Finnegan .operates out of the Victoria 
Docks industrial complex on a series 
of 16-bft games which Ocean 
markets. 

The first SFX project was the 
successful arcade game Firefly, Its 
brig hi packaging ensured that, 




"a publisher 

involved in 

arcade games 

may get Into 
adventures but 
doesn't want to 

be linked to 
those products 

by its arcade 
fans." 



90 124TGM TX 008:7-63 



FEATURE 



although the name Ocean was 
emblazoned on the cassette insert, 
the new company's name hit public 
awareness and prepared the way for 

its latest release Gutz fTGMOOG. 
Spectrum update this issue, 

When you take Gutz apart you can 
see the effect the masters of the new 




label hope it wiif have on you. The 
bright, perhaps lurid, cover ill ustralion 
has the beet American feel to it Even 
the blurb on the bach provides a 
subliminal link with US Mime, in 
particular a graphic [ink with the 
'tyghtmare' of Nrgrtfmare On Elm 
Street - I hope there's no trademark 
clash with the film guys! 

And on to the game which has a 
graphics style almost movie-like in 
Quality and as outrageous a plotline 
as we've come to expect from US 
companies- which sell through UK 
outlets, such as US Gold, These guys 
want their label to have the glamour of 
the fflm world and connections with 
the US. Even the story of Gvfrs 
Development reeks of Hollywood . The 
onginai idea for the game came from 
Andy Rixon. Special FX's graphic 
artist According to Ocean, he 
recentty underwent an exploratory 
banum meal examination which 
produced some colourful pics of his 



guts Once out of hospital he 
discussed his highly original, if now 
downright disgusting, idea with Paul 
Finnegan and the rest of the crew. The 
result we already know, the player 
intesiinally trapped inside 3 
spacebound super alien with a battle 
against a pair deadly dentures at the 
game's end. 

Special FX intends maintaining title 
originality and wants to bade under its 
own name eventually, but until then is 
more than happy with ihe Ocean 
association. The company started 
wHh jusl four members of staff but 
now stands at 12. It's about to do 
another publishing deal with Ocean, 
bul m the meantime is working away 
at us next title, Vertigo, The game is a 
luiurisdc. hyperdrive, version of Top 
Gun in which you take the pad of s 
rookie pilot. This simulator, however - 
located m an underground hinnei - is 

driven by the pilot's mind and is not 
limited to transport or combat. 

Special FX's next marketing move 
is 10 go into PC game production, an 
area booming in Ihe Stales but which 
is meeting resistance here, 



EXOC ET BLAST 

Okay, so Exoeei Is not the most 
endeanng name for a new software 
company, but you've got lo admit thai 
this spank ing new company is holding 
its own againsl the big guns in the 1 6 - 
bit games war, 

Exocei's first game, called 
Foundations Waste (reviewed 
TGrWOOT. Alan ST 77 %), an instant 
success, was marketed aionq similar 



"Andy Rixon 

underwent an 

exploratory 

barium meal 

examination 

which 

produced some 

colourful pics 

of his guts." 



"Special fx 

want their 

label to have 

the glamour of 

the film world 

and 

connections 

with the US." 



American lines to thai of Special FX: 
the program - a multilevel arcade 
game with basic similarities to 
Xevious - is important but so are Ihe 
maps, security passes and colour 
information leaflets in the package. 

Exocet is now well placed to launch 
its second game which is based 
somewhat psychedeiicaliy on reality 
and called Phantasm, It's a weird 
game and, tike so many movies these 
days, based on a dream reality, At the 
start life is a treadmill, The Poll Tax 
collector is about to bother you, the 
bills are there on the mat and you're 
trapped m the mundanily of it ail 
but you can read ail about that in the 
reviews ihis month 1 



CHANGING MARKET 

The software Indusiry, on first 
impressions, has changed hit le since 
mega-corpofations like Ocean and 
Act iviaion - sorry , Mediagemc- came 
on the scene. But. there is a marked 
change in product because, unlike 
olher industries, there is always room 
for new labels, companies and faces 
at the top and in the charts. 

It's a unique trend in the developing 
software market that new people can 
make it to the top so easily, and 
hopefully it will continue to work that 
way. 

Unfortunately, as industries mature 
thaw veins ' grow taught and rt 
becomes increasingly difficult for 
newcomers to break into the 
business. So, if you hanker after 
starling your own software label, now 
might well be the best lime. 




FEATURE PREVIEW 




OUR 




TARGET GAMES reckons to have a new 
approach to computer strategy games. THE 
GAMES MACHINE'S war expert, Robin Hogg, 
tests the boast 

Do you remember Chaos or Rebel Star Raiders'? As a 
Spectrum -owning strategy player, you certainly should. 
They both became cult games, though never receiving the 
wider recognition they deserved. And they have something 
in common apart from strategy, the name of Julian Gollop. their 
programmer. It's been a while - over three years - since Rebel 
Star Raiders, but Julian hasn't been idle, and the results of his 
endeavours can soon be seen, as his new company. Target 
Games pins the software ranks, promoting an entirely new 
approach to computer strategy. 



In earlier times, strategy games were 
viewed as a mi nor part of a publisher's 
releasing policy, and although Chaos 
was marketed by RPG specialists 
Games Workshop's software arm, Ihe 
Company stopped publishing 
software shortly after, Earlier still. Red 
Shrft - noted for their single-minded 
adherence to complex strategy - 
lacked the marketing clout to promote 
Rebel . Star Ranters sufficiently, 
But the game survived , Julian rewrote 
it and rt surfaced through Firebird at 
the ndieulously low price Of £1.99 
under the name of RebeiStar. and is a 
far superior game, Firebird also 
rereteased Chaos as a budget game. 



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REINFORCEMENTS 

The Target Games debut, Laser 
Squad is actually the sequel to 
RebeiStar. U follows RebelStafs 
format m general screen display. Out 
gameplay is considerably improved 
and enlarged. 

For one or two players, there are 
three scenarios now present: The 

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Assassins. Moonbase Assault and 
Rescue From The Mines are the 
tentative titles. Each promises a 
different challenge, white retaining the 
key strategy elements that made 
RebeiStar such a success. Software 
support for Laser Squad wii continue 
after release with further scenario 
data fties. This is a long-overdue extra, 
Rebel Star Raiders offered an 
expansion facility but expansion files 
were never released. Julian hasn't 
finally decided yet. but it looks likely 
that several skill levels will be provided 
too 

In play. RebeiStar veterans will feel 
at home . With a cursor, the entire map 
may be scanned and routes to targets 
planned and tactics determined. 
There's ate© a scanner to display a 
strategic map of the entire playing 
area. 

HIDE AND SEEK 

Something omitted from RebeiStar 
was the option for hidden movement 
which lead to problems: players 
simply moved the cursor around the 



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"Suspense and 
tension and the 
uncertainty of 
close-quarters 
combat have 
been recreated 
perfectly." 



playing area, noted positions of 
attacking troopers and defending 
robots and effected a game- winning 
strategy. Rectified m Laser Squad, the 
line of sight rule is mow employed A 
character may have a perfect view up 
a comdor ahead, but an enemy robot 
could sneak up behind and not 
sported unlil it's too late 1 Suspense 
and tension results, and the 
uncertainty of ctose-quarters-combat 
has been recreated perfectly. 

And there are more extras. At the 
start, each player * given a number of 
points with which weapons. 
equipment and armour can be 
purchased, giving much more 
flexibility m creating game strategies 
and tactics than RebeiStar with its 
fixed set of weapons per trooper. 
Weapons don't iust fire and hit or mss 
their targets, the more potent 
ammunition explodes, destroying not 
only the target but nearby objects loo. 
Fuel tanks explode rf hit. grenades can 
be set to explode immediately or 
timed lo blow up on a later turn. 

Ranged combat includes normal 
methods of aimed shots and 
opportunity shots, but also snap 
shots and automatic fire, the latter 
results m a spray of fire over a player- 
defined area: handy for providing 
Suppressive or covenng fire. 

Each character has thaw own 
statistics, much more than the basic 
stats of characters in RebeiStar. 
Morale, agtlity. Strength, armour, 
w e a pon skills and unarmed combat 
skills an play a part in the conflicts. 

At the time of writing, Laser Squad 
is in a playable state, but the computer 
opponents have yet lo receive 
artificial intelligence, ranged combat 
is also not present in the preview 
version These and Other features are 
being coded even now and Laser 
Squad is on target for an August i 
release on Spectrum and October 3 
for Commodore 64/126, The game 
looks set to be a winner This is classic 
strategy, very user-friendly in 
operation and looks likely to be 
powerful m play. Target Games have 
hit the buiiseye with the first program. 

WIZARD WARS 

Looking ahead. Target Games plans 
to release Lords Of Chaos, a game of 
magical combat bearing a passing 
resemblance to Chaos, 

Up to four wizards can play . casting 
a wide variety of spells at one another 
m a playing area set over a scrolling 
map complete wrth all types of terrain, 
hazards and the obligatory wandering 
monsters. The wizards will be 3x3 
character blocks m size, with at least 
four frames of animation - quite a 
departure from the single-character 
graphics of Chaos. Spells will include 
summoning forth creatures from other 
planes, ones requiring wizards to 
perform prior Tasks (such as standing 
in a pentads or using an artefact.) And 
potions may be created to use against 
enemies and the many weird 
creatures summoned up. 

The scrolling map will mean more 
playing area, more chance for wizards 
to create personal tactics and, 
inevitably. stronger strategic 
gameplay of more depth and scope - 
points which could be said to 
constitute Target's new strategic 
manifesto. 



92/124TGM TX 008:7-88 



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To: KaniK Prpducti Limited, Unit 35< R*f*au fridlrt 
Vale. Gwwnt MP 3 5H> UK 

Please send rr»e 



EttmV 



. Speedkfrvgs with Game at C 11 99 ea 

. SpeedbngvwmhAiJtohr**! £12 99 ea 

Spectrum Plus ? Speedking* *rth Autof ire at E 1 4 99 e* 
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Nintendo* 4t £12 99 pa 



fPrit« include PAP) I enclose Cheque/Postal Order for . 
Made payable to KONIX. Or charge my AccetWtu 

Ho. Signed 

Name {flkxk Capitals} . 

Address = - — 



Postcode 



I AHow14daiysf<Hde4nrery*Crednc*rdholderim«ycallon0495tt0t0l 






Acorn 

THet , hok' , * i t»fr i \|)*Ti(*no6 

Qz Commodore 




Apple and the 

rest of the 
orchard were 
originally so 
dubbed to con- 
vince unauto- 
mated offices 
how very natu- 
ral computers 

01 *3 ■ m * 




Naming the game's the name of the game but, 
as Barnaby Page discovers, a company's 
naming game can put you in oddly-named 
company . . . 



Sock Shop put a stop to it, but il 
you go to am old -f ashioned 
hosier you'll find SOCks with 
names like Indestructible and 
immaculate, names from the 
days when the British Empire was still 
on its feet. Socks: strong, clean, 

But you wouldn't expect to find a 
City sandwich bar called Indomitable 
- no. they've got delicate cute names 
(Doobnes, Munchkins, Sam Widges 
spring to mind) because (hey sell 
dedicate cute comer -fillers. 

Bus lines and airlines are grand, 
geographical, global: United 
Counties. Continental. Horses can be 
iron* - Don't Be Late - or sweeping: 
Burroogh Hill Lad fuses power end 
wikdness (high, windy Burrough HHTj 
and youth. 

But to the outside sock-wearing 
sandwtch-eating bus-nding bet- 
laying world, the most distinctive thing 
about computer names is the truit 
connection: Apple. Apricot- And 
sooner or later Acorn and Oak confirm 
suspicions that you're nearer 
hardware cliches in a garden than 
anywhere else on earth. One 
publishing company, planning a new 
machine- specrhc magazine, has 
jokingly given it the working title of 
Your Potato*.. 

Yet the names of the games 
machines tell a different story. 
Whereas Apple end the rest of the 
orchard were originally so dubbed to 
convince unaulomated offices how 
very nice and natural computers are 
really, mary of the early home 
machines lake Commodore, 

Spectrum jYlerpriss. Jupiter Ace - 
were selling themselves not On 
pastoral user- friendliness but on 
stirring adventurous tags, boldly 
going where no teen had gone before, 

The next generation of machine 
names shows how international the 
industry has become: Amiga, Atari ST, 
Sega, Nintendo are all pronounceable 



in most European and some oriental 
languages, whereas Spectrum would 
be an impossibly foreign-sounding 
word to a French- or Italian-speaker 
(and indeed it's hardly sold outside 
Britain . . .), 

International impact is important. 
Arete, which sella its workstations 
(high power terminals) all aver Europe, 
recently changed its name to Arix - 
because Arete sounds too much Hke 
rhe French for 'stop'! 

When German company Schneider 
announced m March it would Stwt 
selling its low-cost PC clones m 
Britain, directly rivalling Amstrad, one 
response from the British firm was: 
"They'H have a difficult time on the* 
hands. Whilst most people might be 
able to pronounce Schneider, few will 
be able to spell it ' 

Amsirad. which stands for Alan 
Michael Sugar Trading, is functional 
and phonetic (that is, it's wntten 
exactly as it sounds; you could hardly 
misspell it) - a bit like its gliteiess. 
bargain-basement machines. 

Archimedes made a leap of 
understanding and So, its implied. 



can we with Aeom's 32-btt machine: 
Sir Clive Sinclair's portable Z88 could 
just as well have been called the 
Portopai, but there's a technical 
specificity to the name (derived from 
< is 280 processor) which reinforces Sir 
Give's boffin reputation . ft looks good 
in type, too: a Z is only an oblique 
away from being an B. 

Hardware manufacturers, of 
course, have to keep straight; really 
wild machine names would suggest 
unreliability. But whereas each home 
machine competes for custom with 
lust three or four others, the software 
houses must struggle to stand out 
from dozens of labels and come up 
with Some of the most striking 
company and product names around. 

Some try to toed the ftefd wfth btg. 
imperialistic labels of the son usually 
given lo amy I nit Me Ocean. Elite, 
Cascade. US Gold, GO 1 . Oestiny, The 
Power House. Grand Slam 
Entertainment. Efttt. Action Force. 
Ftying Shark, Gunshtp, Enduro Racer, 
Tnondoreafs, 

You can't be too obvious about if. 
though, Top Ten Hits is probably the 



Some try to i**d ttm (i*M with big, imp*risUatic nam**, much mm Thund«rt*t», teen 
hmr* on th* Commodot* (M 



W/124TGM TX 008:7-88 








Oitmr popular n*m»9 mound mormltkm a brand of di*£t>-go*n' amyi nttnt*. Endure 
RfC«r for instanca - Commodorm 94 









worst software house name around 
because it's so transparent, and Code 
Masters comes a dose second. The 
two (hon budget houses might as well 
be called Very Good Games 

Others go for high-tech 
suggestrvity Softek, Digital 

Integration (it means nothing but 
sounds like a powerful program m ing 
technique), Thalamus pi's part of the 
'brain), Psyfrajor, F-1S Strike Eagle. 
Apollo 18, 

Martech almost falls into (hat 
category, Put It's also taken from the 
name of founder David Martin - just 
as Donwk combines bosses Dominic 
Wheatley and Mark Strachan and 
Tynesoft refers to the company's 
Newcastle base 

American houses, catering to an 
older market than British software 
producers, think of themselves as 
equivalent to book publishers or him 
producers and try to show if in their 
names. Electronic Arts and 
MicroPros©, for instance, reconcile 
technical sophistication (electronic, 
itkjo) and creativity (arts, prose). 
Bectnc Dreams and the add-on 
manufacturer Romantic Robot do the 



Some software houses try to gat as 
far away from the fechte image of 
home computing as they can, with 
cute names like Llamasoft, Bug-Byte. 
MAD- (one of the few acronyms) and 
Gremlin Graphics. 

Many try to strike an atavistic. 
primrtivist chord with ritualistic 
sounding names like the new 
Mandarin and Tetecomsoft's Firebird 
and ftainbird - though the latter was 
originally to bs called Bluebird, and 
was renamed after boss Tony 
Rambird when it was found Bluebird 
already existed. Blue packaging 
remains a Rambird feature. 

Others hope for the same effect by 
going an etvy and goolinny with 
pseudo-Celtic game names like TirNa 
Nog and Dun Darach or the medieval 
mystery of Bt^ck Lamp. Sftadawgate 
and Warlock - or try to conjure up the 
mysterious East with Uchi Mata and 
suchilfke. 

Equally embarrassing to say out 
loud are today's shod, meaningless 
vaguely futuristic titles: Trax, POD. 
Zofyx. Xarax. 

More intelligently, puns have 
always been popular in game names 
- Hydrotooi. Frost Byte - and sett- 



mockery is back m vogue. 

In 1984 we had Mata-Gaiactic 
Llamas Battle At The Edge Of Time 
poking fun at I he cosmic struggles 
and santienl animals which feature in 
so many games. 

And recently budget house 
Alternalive announced BMX Ninja, a 
dig at Code Masters's habit of 
throwing together selling words such 
as BMX. super, professional, plus, 
and simulator, (By its own admission, 
Cods Masters counts on 'simulator' 
stimulating sales.) 

Bui Firebird was quick off the mark 
to outdo Alternative with Ninja 
Scooter Simulator , . 

Originality isn't all- Alternative itself 
chose its name because the word 
comes up so often in conversation, 
and IBM made a similar marketing 
masterstroke around 1980 when ii 
chose a genenc term, 'personal 
computer', for its PC range. After all, 
you can hardly avoid saying PC if 
you're talking about personal 
computers, whereas IBM's usually 
extremely boring product names like 
DPPX 370 are unlikely to creep into 
casual conversation. 

IBM also tried the generic -name 
trick in software with its mainframe 
relational database 082 - so simple it 
suggests there have only ever been 
two databases and it's the latest. On 
the PC (!) front, Ashton-Tate has done 
the same with its market leader 
dBase, one of many software 
packages with a CapiTai Letter in the 
huddle of a word. 

Apple Mac software producers are 
ParticuLarty guilty of that nervous tic 
of nomenclature, coming up with 
things like MacDtaw and FulfWrite 
Professional as if they think they're 
cuts: Mac software also has really 
kind of, wow, conceptual names 
sometimes, like HyperCard and ihe 
equally meaningless MacProject. 

But in busmessland, everybody 
loves an acronym most of all. Among 
the operating systems there's UNIX 
and DOS (Microsoft's Bill Gates 
obviously never learned any British 
slang I), and less pronounceably 
there's SOL (Structured Query 
Language for interrogating 
databases; said 'sequel') and 
WYSIWYG (what you see is what you 
get, meaning the printout is exactly 
the same as the screen display, 
pronounced "wrziywig'). 

Among the programming 
languages are BASIC. PASCAL. 
COBOL - and C. which neatly pokes 
tun at the acronym activity with a 
single-letter rwne (and k 
appropriately a concise, unreadable 
language) 

Why Is It that computer people 
fancy these names so? Why is it that 
it's the programmers as often as the 
marketing men who come up wilh ihe 
wildest game titles? Perhaps it's 
because they need to use English 
words again after struggling all day 
with machine talk like: 

■ptr+ + «.'*.'; 

Well, I look tor MacHtavem {office 
administration) and MacThekrnte 
(cut'n'paste), PC compatibles called 
Mango and Banana, Simulator 
Simulator from Code Masters, and a 
Lotus spreadsheet called 6-7-8 in 
recognition of the months the latest 
f -2-3 version is taking. 

imagine the name of the gam* . . . 




The Apple Madntod 




~apricoi 




Originality isn't 
alt. Alternative 
Itself chose Its 
name because 

the word 
comes up so 
often In con- 
versation . . , 



TGM TX 008:7-8896/124 



All prices include VAT/delivery 



AATARI" 



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Includes STFM wtm 1M6G dnve. 22 
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1040 STF nwlh mono monrtor........ ...,., ..,.,, £549.00 

Megs ST2 witfi mom monitor „.,„.. £669-00 

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Alan SM124/5 mono monitor £l3-*.0G 

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TECHNOFUN 




CAMCORDER 

REVOLUTION 



The Integrated Leisure Environment (as THE 
GAMES MACHINE reported last month) Is almost 
with us, and a vital aspect Is the role video has 
to play. Videos are learning to talk to 
computers, but to Join the conversation, you 
need a Camcorder; to kick off the dialogue, Mel 
Croucher offers some suggestions on best- 
buys in a minefield of electronic alphanumeric 
suffixes 



IKtto cameras that can play 
back tapes instantly through 
the wiewfindef or via a television 
screen, have been with us for 
more than five years, and UK 
sales have increased by a hefty 70% 
»nce June 1986. instant action - 
replays of holidays, weddings. 
funerals, sports and Auntie Ethel 
fishing tor her teeth mumbling 'I don't 
know what to say' are now as 
common as muck, But with the 
introduction Of wonderful video 
software packages, the market is 
changing rapidly Electronic Arts 
have just released DekiHeProducttons 
(TGM007) and Oert/jteVWflO 12. 
which gives the home user a moving 
title option, animated graphics, 
mutttpie scene generators, range of 
wipes, sounds, special effects and 
even a weather map. If you own an 
Amiga and have £U9 (twice) 
knocking around, you could be 
mak>ng sophisticated videos at the 
touch of a few buttons. 

The Camcorder of 1988 is more 
comple* and sophisticated than the 
orbitaf Sputmh of 1958! 'Sputnik 1 is 
Russian for "travelling companion', 
which is as good a definition as any for 
today's combined video' camera - 
tape-recorder lis about the same 
size and weight as that primitive 
sateime, contains ten times more 
electronics, and Is about one hundred 
m Ulon th the cost 

We asked our man with the 
Sugarcubes on his stereo and the 
icecubes in his brain to come up with 
a simple diagram of Starship 
Camcorder (over the page), to help 
explain a highly complex chunk of 
hardware The fact, that cartoonist 
Robin Evans is clinically insane is 
proved yel agam stifl. that's what 
comas of knock knock knocking on 
Evans's door. 



STARSHIP 
CAMCORDER 

the on-board components: 

O POWER PACK: rechargeable 
battery cells provide any* 
thing up to one hour's porta- 
ble location use. Low-battery 
warning lights are normally 
displayed through viewfinder and/ 
or on the operating panel. Mains 
power can also be provided by a 
wired power unit, connected to a 
voltage adaptor 



OMKMmONE: (or 'my crow 
phone' according to Evans') 
The modern Camcorder mic 
is highly sensitrve, and captures live 
sound onto a puny strip ot your 
video tape in the case of VHS, or 
across the whole tape width in the 
case of Video-8. This electronic ear 
is usually the least sophisticated 
part of your machine because it is 
cursed with an Automatic Level 
Control which searches out any 
sounds in quiet conditions and 
amplifies 1 hem. Especially annoying 
is when it picks up the noise of your 
zoom fens Servo and makes it 
sound tike a dying mosqurto. 
although the muttering curses of the 
wedding photographer are often 
much more entertaining than the 
bride's drunken father. 

0LEMS SYSTEM: the eye of the 
camera. An electronic ins 
automatically ad j u st s it self to 
handle lighting conditions which 
can vary from a bnihant snowscape 
to a candle-lit bedroom. An infra- 
red autofocus is often sensed 
through the lens system, which can 
be made up of 20 or 30 elements, 
controlled by microprocessor. 



OZ00M FOCUS COtfTftOL twin 
electronic servos adjust the 
iens barrets during automa- 
tic recording, and provide the 
optimum focus of y out images white 
you prat about with enlarging or 
shrinking your subject, (Observant 
readers will note that the artist 
relused to include ihis component, 
for reasons of amnesia. J 

OPTICAL RLTEJl: the unsung 
hero of ihe Camcorder, this 
little gismo captures all those 
unwanted specks of disturbing 
light, and imprisons them in its own 
black hole, this stops the tones of 
your moving images getting 
distorted, but il also means you are 
sacrificing the finest detail in order 
to prevent horrible pulsing patterns 
invading playback. 

O IMAGE SENSOR: this is where 
it all happens! About half a 
million microscopic units 
known as 'silicon photodsodes' are 
arranged >n a partem which 
analyses the images allowed 
through the optica] filler, tt decides 
how bright and what colour each 
speck of the image is, and, when 
happy, sends out its data m a pulse 
of information Then it updates its 
opinion 60 times a second! 

OMEWHNDCPk a marvel of 
modem technology, shrink- 
ing a television tuner, a mono 
TV receiver, video amplifier and two 
separate time-base circuits, all 
down into something the size of a 
packet of Mates. It allows you to 
observe what the Camcorder is 
'seeing', and even allows for your 
own weird eyesight with a tiny focus 
adjustment. 

OMttftOfflOCESSOftS: (You've 
already used that joke, 
E vans') Your Camcorder is 
stuffed full of these babies Printed 
circuit boards are often flexible, so 
that they can be rammed around 
bends inside ihe machine's body. 
These eteclrooics are the key to a 
Camcorders compact size, and 
they have been miniaturised to an 
incredible scale Some are taught 
what to do at the factory, some learn 
or make it up as they go along 
according to what use they are put 
to. and others have Ittte 



The Camcorder 
Is more sophis- 
ticated than 
the orbital 
Sputnik of 
1958! 'Sput- 
nik 1 Is Russian 
for 'travelling 
companion', as 
good a defini- 
tion as any for 
today's com- 
bined video/ 
camera-tape- 
recorder. 



TGM TX 008: 7-8897/124 



SONY CCD-M8E HANDTCAM £599 
The press rs luH of offers on this Video* 
S poppet, anything from free holidays, 
a stick of prerecorded tapes or up to 
50% price cuts! The makes *1 an 
absolute bargain, and I recommend it 
without hesitation. Both colour and 
sound are miles better than most VHS 
machines, motor noises are battled by 
a robust body sheil, its a doddle to 
use, battery life is one of the longest 
available at well over an hour, there's 
a 50 qmd optional underwater 
conversion housing (honest 1 ) and a 
long-play option. The only serious 
drawback is that rts lowiight use is 
very limited, so take the lampshade 
off the bedside light. 

FERGUSON FG06 £620 

£644 
CT-1100E899 

These three machines are exactly the 
same, onry the names have been 
changed to confuse the buyer, so 




conferences about what to do next Sony vaooo- 
Everything Is controlled by (hem, th*top-et~th** 
including servo-motors, tape r0Tt&€ mmchtn* 
handling, audiovisual processing, 
focus, zoom, even a weather report 
il mere is too much moisture in the 
atmosphere for sate recording, 

OV1 D E CASSETTE TATE PECK: 
the part ol Starship Camcor- 
der where the aliens get in. 
such as cat hairs, crumbs-in- 
sputum and very instant coffee. The 
tape stored on the video cassette is 
gently persuaded to leave its home 
and go for a spin around the guts of 
the machine, where sound and light 
is passed over it for safekeeping. 

JT\ MDEO HEAD DRUM; this is the 
I machine's workshop, where 
^■^ the live Image is translated 
into the stored image. Don 'I be 
templed to straighten Out this 
component it really is meant to tilt 
like that. 

©CAPSTAN: the roller than 
moves the head drum at the 
correct speed, and holds the 
video tape tight. It's controlled by a 
highly sophisticated crystal timer. 

® LIGHT EMITTING If 

you've ever wondered what 
that glowing glass nipple is 
ihere by the cassette deck, it's the 
bn that tells your machine that the 
tape has come to the end, and thai 
the Starship is rewinding and 
shutting down until it receives new 
instructions. The diode radiates a 
tiny infra-red spotlight, which 
senses the leader tape at the 
beginning and end of the cassette. 



WHICH CAMCORDER? 

Mel's analysis of what's on offer. 

Don't buy a Camcorder! If you are interested in using one, rent 
the damn thing, borrow one, get one on seven days approval, 
but DO NOT BUY. We are talking anything between £600 and 
two grand, they take time for you to assess their wrinkles, 
advantages and disadvantages and their suitability for your 
ability need. And having said that, here's my analysis. 



you'd be crajy to pay extra for the 
Ntormende, They are also heavily 
discounted in the htghstjeet. and if 
you look hard enough you might find 
them for as little as £499 Don't be 
footed, nobody gives away something 
for nothing, and the reason for these 
bargain prices is that: a) the machines 
are being phased out of production, 
and b) the quality is chronic. They use 
the weeny mi m~ VH S cassettes, gi vi ng 
30 minutes of bad quality recording, 
or, at the optional stow speed, one 
hour's worth of really terrible qually 
recording, They are very compact, in 
fact almost pocket-size, but very 
fragile. Audio is infested with hissing 
snakes and video reminds me of the 
attributed clashes of a Sinclair 
Spectrum. 

JVCGR-C11 £699 

TELEFUNKEN VM-Z895 £699 

PWUPSVKB-6836E700 

Again these are one and the same 



Panasonic HV MSB 



(T) Power Pack 

© Microphone 

@Lens 

(f) Zoom Control 
(that artist forgot)' 

<D Optical Fitter 

(6) Image Sensor 

©Vi«wf i noer 

(§) Microprocessors 

(§) Video Cassette 

@ Video Head Drum 

fjj) Capstan 

(Q Light Emitting Diode 



machine, and are Ihe replacements 
for the machines mentioned 
immediately above, And what an 
improvement! Chunkier, weighing tn 
at i 2 kilos, the picture quality is 
remarkable for such a small machine. 
Unfortunately the sound facilities are 
still dismal, and because some ctown 
has omitted an option to switch off the 
autofocus, your video will suffer from 
hideously amplified autofocus servos 
every time something moves 
backwards Or forwards in shot 

SONY CCO-V30 HANDYCAM £899 
A reasonable machine using Video-fl, 
with a number of faults that can be 
overcome. The lousy built -m mic can 
be replaced by plugging in a decent 
external mic. the lousy vtewfinder 
fools you into thinking that your 
■mages are blurred and so you get a 
nice surprise when you play back 
through a monitor and the lousy lens 
is compensated by good macro 
facility. Battery trie is about 40 
minutes. 

CANON VM-E2 £1099 

Serious V<deo-8 stuff, and looking like 
a World War II tank! Sound and visual 
quality both well above average, and 
featuring the following important 
facilities: fader, macro lens option, a 



96/124TGM TX 008:7-88 




TECHNOFUN 






SANYO VM-01 E110O 
FISHER FV-P801 El 100 
Anolher l win-branded offering, and 
very good it is indeed Both sound and 
images lake full advantage of the 
excellent Video-8 potential, and the 
autofocus motor is almost silent. An 
on-board slow motion option is great 
fun, all the controls are dead easy to 
use, and I would definitely 
recommend this machine except for 
one factor: I couldn't hold the damn 
>teady" Whoever designed the 
handle is either a sadist or an orang- 
tttng 

SHARP VL-C73HA £1200 
A gimmicky VHS-C mint- cassette 
model, which looks great on paper but 
results in some very annoying 
features, such as less than 30 
minute's battery life and a deafening 
tape deck But if you are the sort of 
nerd who drives a Citroen * , i suppose 
you'll go for gizmos like van-speed, 
sound overdub. data and time 
character generators, still frame, on- 
board index-search, edit and macro. 




Son ¥ CCOV90 
(TT* H*nttyc*m) 




Pmntaonic HV M7B 



■ iMm QducHw Awn ■ pi Mirk Cftrt* lot TftS SptW 

cf*mrfi«d Ml el a rn aul M ewrttft Mi m VmtHon t 
lehcnnlwaml iwd -H 1 1\ otto in* j Iftcm m* MM 
net nMh i t/tcHtf bffjtM on ihff fluM. wtitt ttott nut rtvifa 



JVC GR-C7 £1200, also known as 

TOSHIBA SK-60P £1250 
MUSUBUSHI HS-C20 £1300 
AKAJPV-C8E1300 
PHILIPS VKR-6830 £1300 
SHARP VC-C50 £1400 
All of these are the same mini- 
cassette VHS-C machine, and they 
are all better than a poke m the eye 
with a cold sausage, being incredibly 
easy to use. Suffering from the usual 
tooih-grmding top distortion on 
audio, the video facilities are 
excellent, with macro, fader, twin- 
speed plus good backlight and whrle- 
balance controls. The good news is 
that the machine is over two years oid. 
and the multiples are Irving to offload 
their stock on a greedy public. Bargain 
prices to be had as the summer sales 
do battle in the high street. 

PANASONIC NVf-MS £1300 
Do not touch this excellent VHS 
machine at ihis price, even though it is 
the best -selling Camcorder in ihe 
land! It has just been superseded by 
the NV-M7 which actually costs a quid 
lass. The dealers will have to reduce 
the pnce soon. Having said that, if you 
Insist on using the dreadful VHS 
standard, you couldn't do better than 
this machine. Time and data character 
generator, fader, audio dub, slo-mo, 
still, strobo. but still featuring truly dire 
audio quality. About £995.95. plus a 
free power pack and halt a dozen 
tapes seems about right. 

PANASONIC NY-M7 £1 299 

Firstly, its bloody heavy, and not a 
hand-held. Secondly, once you've 
erected the scaffolding on your 
snoukter, it's bloody good. Everything 
that the MS does, plus a brilliant dying 
erase head {for razor sharp butt-edits 
and cuts), two autofocus options, twin 
audio visual fader, plus 125 
characters, four fonts, 10-page 
memory, 9-page scmthng, nutodate 
and stopwatch, ' Hah 1 However, I have 
two Criticisms: first, there is no 
lowlight warning visible through the 
viewfinder, which verges on the 
criminal; second, they have scrapped 
the headphone monitor socket on the 
old NV-M5. So you can't hear what 
you are recording. The gimmicks are 
useful, but not essential, and I still 
recommend the NV-MS at discount 
pnces, 

HITACHI VM-C30 £1299) 
Mini- VHS machine whtch was 
designed tor a neanderthal bricklayer. 
(It looks (ike abousebrick. weighs like 
a housebnck , and your skull structure 
has to slope alarmingly if you want to 
look through the vie winder.) Hitachi 
also assume that neanderthal 
bricklayers do not need to manually 
focus or zoom, and that their primitive 



hearing will nol mind the sound of 
Iryinglat dripping into boiling mud. 

PENT AX PV-G800 £1400 

What .i pedkjn rwma to hang on ■ 
Camcorder! What a pig of a machine! 
This is in fact a Hitachi in disguise, and 
they ought to be ashamed of 
themselves Designed for flat chests 
or square shoulders, the visual 
images are what the Japanese cad a 
road of clap' and our fiow-iest 
batteries clapped out after 20 
minutes. Bah' 

SONY CCO-V1 00 PRO-8 £1600) 
SONY CCO-V200 PRO-8 £1800 

Okay. I admil. I use Sony's Pro Video- 
8 range for my A/V productions, but 
they are tax deductible and they are 
simply superb. I mean superb! II you 
are serious about professional quality 
Camcording. hire one one these 
babies and see what I mean . The good 
news is thai with the V200 on stream, 
wa can expect to see some healthy 
discounts on last yeer*9 model, 
rumours are that prices will stand at 
an amazing £1299 for the VI 00 by 
Christmas, and when you compare 
these machines to anything else in 
that price bracket It's like comparing a 
sack of lumips lo Vanessa Paradis'a 
armpits (No it's not -Ed.J (Yes >' <s. 
I've done it -Croucher.) Sony's Pro 
machines took like the sort of ENG 
cameras that TV outside broadcast 
units employ, they weigh in at a hefty 
3 kilos, but sit comfortably on ihe 
shoulder, and they contain the BJ7 1 
PCM sound (and that means state-of- 
the-art digital!), stereo audio dubbing, 
time lapse recording, 7 -hour wipe/ 
fade parameters. van-speed 
zoom.perfect pictures it any tight 
level, even a narration monitor rrwc for 
the cameraman who wants to use an 
audio notepad. A truly beautiful 
product, with nothing to (Oucl 

Yea, t know all about SUPER-VHS, 
HO- VHS and HI -HES SUPEB V -8. and 
I'm sure they will improve image 
quality by leaps and bounds. But in 
the Camcorder market place ol July 
1 968 we are assaulted from all sides 
by a mass of similar products, many 
of which are l he same machine with a 
different badge stuck on the side. Let 
me leave you with these comments, 

SOUND; if you are serious about the 
d quality of your videos, go for 
Video-fl. VHS come nowhere near It. 
IMAGES: most Camcorders give very 
similar results, apart from a couple of 
naff models listed above. So comfort 
and ease of use become a major 
factor. Try before you buy 
SPECIAL OFFERS: Sorry about this 
all you excellent independent 
retailers, but it's the Mghstreet 
multiples who not only offer realistic 
stock-clearing reductions, but also 
back them up wnh a genuine 12- 
month guarantee, With kit as 
expensive as Camcorders this is a 
major factor. 



Sharp VL-C73HA 







- SONY CCD-MSE HANDYCAM 

- PANASONIC NV-M5 VHS 
SONY CCD-V200VIDEO-6 



TGM TX 008:7-8899/124 








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100/124 TGM TX 008:7-88 







m Blade Runner to Robocop, future-fiction 
as a bleak tomorrow in store for us, where the 
iily being to enjoy a car may be the robot that 

built it. Stuart Wynne outlines science fiction's 

cyberpunk future 

fn today's world the wavefront o( the future seems ever less 
distant with yesterday's technological wetdream tomorrow's 
uodane hardware. The state of the hi-tech art changes at rate 
hich would impress, if not depress an Amiga owner glumly 
>nsidering RISC chips and interactive CD-RAM. 

^% wan beyond the rarified . techno ■ 

■■addicted world of computers. 

J the wider world experiences the 

Impact of (uturrstic advances 

■ which, increasingly, blur 

difference between fact and exo: 

"ience fiction. SOI. with rta Star Wars 

, is almost a clichG example 

irie serious proposals to map 

i blueprint of DMA go almost 

I. though they may well be 

'a significant . in Bangladesh 

■^-shed technology of 

V leads to refugees 

<nt organs. 

As the razor edge of a technology 

cuts amorally and 

f through our society, it's 

ihat popular SF should so often 

the form of nostalgia. The Star 

trilogy, for example, drew 

AfflspMation from escapist fairy 

. - as did Its n umerous imitators 

i the nostalgia of Back To the 

Peggy Sue Goi M&tWd is 

self-evident. Yet in the 

as Stat Wars broke box 

sfton story appeared 

tots Of A Hologram 

Rose - rt presaged the arrival of a 

new subgenre eventually 

id 'cyberpunk 



newest of SF new waves has 

drawing s serious, not to 

highly exciting and 

stylish line on the near- 

ever since In '964 William 

i, the man who kicked it all off 

hi Fragments, had his first novel 

Dished to ecstatic critical ac> 

•led Neoromancsf it won the 

nhp K Ok* Neb. 

*Nte. an p ol 




' s top h 

The 'toe 



cyberpunk however. 
er two years 
as Gibson was 
aft - when *he 
civ* opened 
mmercial 
first poor 
imed it the 
lie voice- 
thai ptague the Mm today. Blade 
A well on its way to 
i cult movie on a scale 
into question the word 
a recent Sky magazine 
Ridley Scott (director of both 
Runner and 4fcen) argygd^Jffi 



movie had been sheadH Hpme and 
should be rereteased fhdp lose 

to its original f ^^F 0r1 * or 

Scott's view can be gathered from 
how its immensely atmospheric, 
quintessential^ cyberpunk 'look' has 
influenced everything from Barclay 
Bank ads to Michael^ Jackson's Bad 
I our to the en in o logic Of NETWORK 7, 
Movies similarly inspired by Blade 
Runner's trashed. Wle eh visuals 



Include Max Headroom. Alien? and 
Robocop The success of the latter 
films, particularly RobOCOiP, has ted to 
several cyberpunk writers being 
offered large fees lor movies based 
on their novefs and original scripts 
William Gibson, tor example, is 
currently working on the script lor 
Aliens III wilh a short story optioned 
r it iiim production. and fVeuromarwer 
is similarly opt ioned to a corporation - 




CYBERPUNK AND 
COMPUTERS 

The most dramatic exam- 
pie of computers fn 
cyberpunk rety on the 
endlessly controversial 
subject of Ai (artificial 
intelligence) which has 
computers as intelligent, 
if nol more so, than 
humans. Even during the 
Fifties - the computer 
stone age - the subject 
was topic for hoi debate, 
with the prominent 
mathematican Dr Alan 
Turing proposing a test 
involving a computer 
communicating with a 
person - via notes - who 
doesn't know his conver- 
sation is with a computer. 
If the person fails to rec- 
ognise the computer as 
Such, isn't it artificially 
intelligent? 

Already- however, com- 
puters crudely mimicking 
psychotherapists have 
passed such a Tunng 
test, although this 
perhaps tells us more 
about the depth of typical 
psychoiheraphy sessions 
than computer intelli- 
gence. 

Of late AJ has gone 
through something ol a 
bad patch, with attempts 
to create it m limited areas 
such as understanding 
Speech running into 
immense difficulties. The 
more rules programmed 
into a computer telling rt 
things - eg birds ffy - the 
more rules seem neces- 
sary : ostriches don r t , This 
rule-based method of 
programming has hence 
fallen out of favour, giving 
way to a radically new 
approach: connec- 
tKjmsm 

This might give a com- 
puter the word ' intelli- 
gence' and the sound ol it 
being spoken. Rather 
than programming the 
computer with intricate 
rules on how to pro- 
nounce the word , it is sim- 
ply tokJ to work its own 
rules out and (eft alone 
until it does so. The rules 
produced might be 
wrong, but given enough 



TGW TX 008:7-8S1Gt/l24 



words they should eve 
until reasonably accurate. 
Sett -programming com- 
puters probably offer 
most hope for 
although what that re 
means is difficult to dein 
smce 'intelligence* itself 
can't easily be explained. 
Things will not be made 
easier when the Japanese 
inevitably produce a 
printer which tells you 
bow to operate It and has 
an Al sticker on it. 
For most people, how- 
ever, Al Is most vividly 
associated with 200 Ts 

HAL 9000 computer and 
cyberpunk has a similarly 
straightforward view Of Al 
as very intelligent indeed 
The ambitions of an Al are 

what propel the pk 

William Gibson's rVeuro- 

mancer with the Winter- 

mute computer needing 

a subprogram to express 

itself in lerms simple 

enough for a human to 

understand. In Max 

Headroom, of course, the 

Al is a simulation of a pre - 

sumed-deed reporte 

that comes to distm 

quirky, if not glitched. 

Such ideas may seem 
more like fantasy but an 
acclaimed scientist, who 
presumably knows more 
about the subject than 
most, was featured on a 
recent Non^On Smugly 

predicting humans would 
and up - at best -as pets 
for Als. Even the typical I' 
dour Engineering To 
magazine carried a fea- 
ture forseeing carbon 
based life (humans) be 
replaced by the siic 
based variety Win 
biological computer 
chips looming on the 
technological horizon 
that may seem a little 
quaint now, but the ge 
eral argument reman 
A rather less threatening 
application of computers 
is the creation of 
cyberspace, a consen- 
sual hallucination experi- 
enced daily by billions of 
legitimate operators 
Cyberspace has its 
gins in "primitive arc 

games ... in early 
graphics programs and 
•iNtary experimentation 
tin cranial jacks". This 
ibsoman invention has 
:h of tomorrow's w< 
and commynicat! 
being done via a fibre- 
optn; interconnected 
electronic world owing 
much to the visual style of 
the movie Tron. 
Rather than struggle with 
the intricacies of numer- 
ous computer operating 

systems cyberspace 
the supreme WIM P iconic 
interface - has a whole 
alternative world 



Cabana Say Productions - formed 
exclusively to handle It The British TV 
movie Max Headroom, by contrast. 
has already been reshol for the US 
market and a hugely expensive TV 
series launched there (now available 
on video*-, me UK) 

VCR 

The best definition of cyberpunk, a 
■jubgenre which has no rigid format, is 
probably Gibson's, The future he 
ruttrapolaied from such unusual 
sources as The Face and Arena owes 
much to a now perhaps rather dated 
vision of Britain, with Gibson's 
Boston -Atlanta Metropolitan Attn or 
Sprawl suffering a deteriorating 
economy and splintered society, the 
only ihings holding BAMA together 
being lube trams and a colourful gtoss 
of bizarre fashion The importance of 
the UK to Gibson's work « best shown 
by Ne latest novel: Moris Lisa 
Overdrive, which has the daughter of 
a Yakuza enmekvd seeking refuge m 
a gnm neo- Victorian' London replete 
with such eternal British institutions as 
the Dorchester hotel and Harrods, 
This vaguely posi -apocalyptic future 
world, teetering on the brink of yet 
more undefined ceterrwhes that the 
individual is helpless to prevent, 
leaves style as virtually the only 
expression of individuakTy and sanity 
Julius Dftarm was f 36 years 
okt . Case had new seen him 
wear the same suit twice His 
offices (had/ Nea-Aitec 

bookcases Qisnaystytott 

radte tamps patched awkwardly 
on a tow KanoVisAy-(OC* coffee 
iahfe ... A Dah clock bung on the 
wait between the bookcases . . 
Heuramancer (p20~2 }) 
Such characters are far removed from 
the technocratic . superctoan 
astronaut SF stereotype It's a key 
insight of cyberpunk that the realty 
life -changing technology is far frfjm 
that involved m extravagant Soviet- 
American Mars shots, but rather the 
coffee- Stained variety residing m, for 
example, the VCRs and home 
computers which have radically 
changed UK leisure activities, Or 
alternatively one coukj point to the Of- 
smeared technology which is Fiats 
famous robots, drably transforming 
the world, if only by producing 
flawless cars for a market shrunken 
by unemployment 

TECH NOIR 

The cyberpunk central characters 
which inhabit near-fulure worlds so 
dramatically changed, poteens a 
dubious gamut. Their skM lies in 
surviving on the fringes of reapectebte 
society, m the most grey areas of 
i-rjfiiir, and montty while 
simultaneously exploiting the latent 
hrMech to coma scything through a 
fragmented and confused world. 
Outlaw computer hackers are 
particular favourites of Gibson's work, 
white the principal tawlife of Walter 
Jon William's Hardwired are a 
smuggteajpnd an assassin, the latter 
being the essential role of Qir.k 
Oeckard in Scott's Blade flunne/.Tte* 
her o of another cyberpunk work , John 
Shirley's £citpsa, rs a bumf-out rock 
star addicted to the legendary Velvet 
Underground, partial to blue mesc' 



drugs and in the process of being 
dropped from his band for a 

mmimono wire act". At, •.* ori stories 
by Gibson. Lewis Shiner and Pal 
Cadtgan testify, rock music is both a 
popular theme and inspiration .■ 
Ihe genre. The fractured, hyper-reality 
'J MTV's kaleidoscopic content is m 
fad a useful analogy for the vision 
cyberpunk has of an endlessly 
variegated, designer-drugs, 

designer-genetics, designer-surgery* 
near-fulure 

This generally foreboding, retro- 
fitted fech noir vision has led Bruce 
Sterling to suggest, in Foundeiton 
magazine, th»f solution* He 'hot in 
dressing as elves', instead we should 

put pennies on the fuses: jam the 
pedal to the floorboards, and go for 
broke We need every last mutant 
and nutcase we can spare, to beat the 
brush for paths to the next miHonrum' . 
The shear exuberance of this 
attitude under the looming shadow of 
disaster is what helps give cyberpunk 
much of tt& excitement and sheer 
energy. 

THE END OF THE 

NATIONS? 

What underpins all this dramatic 
writing and bleak film-making rs a 
notion probably best expressed m 
AJvm Toffler 's critically acclaimed 
work of non-fiction futurology; The 
Third Wave Toff tor "5 argumam is that 
contemporary society ts m the 
process of transforrrung from a 
Second Wave, or industrial civilisation 
into a Third Wave one. [A First Wave 
society is one which has switched 
from ■ nomadic, hunter-gatherer life- 
style to a settled, agricultural one.) 
Near synonyms for Thtrd Wave 
civilization are Global Village, 
Information Age or Scientific- 
Technological Revolution (a Soviet 
term}, en of which Toffler believes 
inadequate to encompass the fuM 
scope of the change which rs radically 
affecting global society now 

The driving forces of this cyberpunk 
transformation might be reduced to 
three factors; technological, 
economic and ecological 

Technology began the Second Wave 
through industrialisation which, until 
the advent of the microchip, was 
inherently stupid, favouring mass- 
production and mass-markets with 
people preferably as alike as PC 
clones. A new. diversifying wave of 
technology such as VCRs and direci- 
broadcast satellites will shatter such 
things as mass-media leading to a far 
more diverse culture, Twenty minutes 
into M«* Headroom' s future, for 
instance, there are 4000 TV Stations 
competing for viewer attention -with 
some literally explosive advertising. 
fWith a little luck the new 
Broadcasting Standards Council 
won't be able to make them al aa 
bonng as Sunday morning TV.) 

Advances m transport have, 
however, simultaneously unified the 
world economically so that a SAM -7 
sold m Ce ntral America on Monday 
can tti*»o down an atrhner in 
Afghanistan on Wednesday week. 
Organisations which operate on 
transnational bnea thus eland to make 
huge profits and where national 
governments. of^fWhs, resist its 



t,^™. v practices, other countries will 

not - for example the Ford/Dundee 

experience In 1973 the annual safes 

of General Motors were larger than the 

GriP of Switzerland, Pakistan and 

S Africa The success of this relatively 

new business breed lad some 

executives to extravagant a aims: 

The world's pokt>cai structures are 

completely obsolete. They have 

not changed in a feast a hundred 

years end are woefully out of tune 

with technological progress, 

Jacques 6 Maisonrouge, 

Director IBM World Trade Corp. 

The spectre of all-powerful 

corporations has bean a staple of SF 

at toast smce RoHerbati. but 

cyberpunk has added a new depth io 

this theme with the fictional Tesster- 

Ashpoof forming a centrepiece of 

Gibson's rVe^rpm anc ar Another 

example of this is Wetter Jon William s 

Hardwired wh»ch features a brilliant 

sequence Star Wars-like aerial battle 

thai merely sets the scene for the real. 

Well Street-type war - a aeries of 

rapid- fire stock market manipulations 

that make use of damage caused by 

the dogfights to depreciate the target 

corporation's share values. 

Toffler behevea a passing of 
national government power to 
transnational and local democratic 
authorities will cope with a global 
marketplace exploited by 

transnational organizations. 

Cyberpunk tends to be less optimistic 
- possibly due to a brief look at the 
ineffectual EEC and defunct GLC. 
H is ecology, however, which 
outea moat to the pessimism of 
the genre In the early Seventies the 
Qi criaie added much weight to the 
arguments of THE LIMITS TO 
GROWTH which, using sophisticated 
computer models, predicted an 
industrial coeapee in 2010 and t 
catastrophic drop m population by 
2050 A current oil glut helps disguise 
the fad thai even if the UMiTS 
timetable is flawed no one is replacing 
total fuels. At the tame time the 
bummg of fossil fuels, temporary 
expansion of farmland m the Amazon 
and - of course - ozone depletion are 
seriously eroding the environment in 
1988 the internationally respected 
Wortdweich Institute claimed that 
without international cooperation on 
Ihe scale that occurred after World 
War 11 ... 'there will be human 
suffering, on a acaie thai has no 
precedent' 

The consequences of skyrocketing 
energy costs, mineral shortages and 
economic depression are the subtle 
subtext thai onderke* such film* as 
Blade Runner. Scott's fnfamr>hke LA 
2013 no more features characters 
explaining such things than LA Law 
ax plei nt the foundations of America's 
poat-WW It success, The signs of a 
future environmental collapse ere 
evident, however, m the constant 
acid-rain, the concept of animals 
bema so rare the idea of kKkno one is 
Brno*! ureim ym e eno me teim* 
fitting, rather than repJi" 
virtually everything T -."■• - 
of this world the '.tnweaikwi ge r 
Miwreahey ere-, an****""- e tor 

remark. Shines TT"^ for 
example, takes place after a hm 
nuclear ^flp™he* bean fought * 
drawn in Europe. The continuation of 
dramatic human 



102/124TGM TX 008:7-88 



MOM TNI HUSO UD WltUL* AWiHB 
AiNHihC i\iThQB Or HtU*0*Mt*CiP 

WILLIAM GIBSON 



FEATURE 



I IMMCIOT 
Dirt littiB by , 

i : g .. u- -,. • mi pi n ■■<> y«N happen 
& a central cyberpunk theme with a 
cksturtxng nng of tru" 

•'»■ wnal makes trie 
subgerwe valuable 

While the future is unlikely lo 
resemble closely any of t he numerous 
licb&ns labeled "cyberpunk", some of 
me issimk. which it explores, sych as 
genetic engineering, environmental 
coaapss ana ai uncta? 
probabryptey some s 
deciding hqapwlive 
down the SriB-wben 
cwrreril CrOp of polity 
anddecenonmakftrs 
long deed. The inti 
rtereMolTV 
Mm producers and 
broad critical 
lor cyberpur* 
ftaialot of 
feel that this 
particular sub-g 
idiocy m trying 
predict li *: 
unpredictable t 
guttata* ta 



a 






' ii in i mi i| '■Hip^^^M 





* 



k Mtl'O *«W WKll «« TNI MMtO 

OQUNT ZfflQ 

WILLIAM QfBSON 



AC 

.'£■■■ -v 



, cyber- 
unk charac- 
rs possess a 
ubious genius 
- outlaw com- 
puter hackers 
are particular 






NEXT MONTH; a guide to some of 
the best examples of print and 
cinematic cyberpunk, beginning 
with reviews of some of the tatter. 




interacted with by your 
thoughts- Apart from the 
cranial lacks, all this 
seems tittle more distant 
than CO- RAM and a third 
generation ParSec 
machine. With increasing 
computer capabilities 
making photograph-type 
animation commonplace, 
modem - shoppi ng/work - 
ing/ relaxing might well be 
as allunng as Gibson 
paints it. 

Already m the US there 
are modem-games which 
allow people to fly aircraft 
in a 'consensual halhxs- 
nal ton ' simulating a battle 
zone, USAF research 
meanwhile seeks to do 
away wrth bulky cockpit 
canopies and submerge 
thek pilots m 3-D, real- 
time computerised simu- 
lations Of the war zone 
they might be dropping 
real bombs in Dial the 
wrong code on your 
modem and you and your 
MicroProse software 
could nuke Managua for 
real . . 

Paradoxically the ufUmate 
question underlying all 
these state-of-the-art 
technoiogicai advances 
iS nature Of human life. If 
humans are merely 
biological machines why 
shouldn't machines 
eventually be able to 
simulate and finally sur- 
pass us as we replaced 
Neanderthal Man? Cuts 
Newsroom! stones of 
chimps able to communi- 
cate through icon -based 
languages give the lie to 
the traditional, biblical 
idea of only Man being 
po s sessed of abstract 
reasoning powers. Even 
pigeons, apparently, can 
be trained to follow 
abstract logic - so are we 
really so special and inim 
itable? 

A related question is 
provoked by cyberspace 
which, with its potential 
for cinematic, hyper-real 
ex penences, otters a rival 
to conventional reality 
itself- In rVeoroma/icerthe 
hero is offered a Faustian 
pact for his soul, the 
reward for his acceptance 
is a life within cyberspace 
on an island with a perfect 
Al simulation of his dead 
girtfnend. Computer 
'games' such as that 
would indeed be ' less a 
game, more a way of life' 
Perhaps, as is suggested 
by books like Eclipse and 
Coutft Zero, technology 
may bring a variation on 
the old question of God 
creating Man or vice 
versa, wrth humanity's 
subterranean dreams 
creating its own 
cyber space god. heaven 
and hell 



TGM TX 008:7-88103/124 



ROLEPLAY 



A DIFFERENT 
CODE OF HONOUR 



John Woods goes roleplaying In the Far- 
East this month with the RuneQuest 

ent Land Of Ninja, and occidentally 

at a Warhannmer Fantasy Roleplay 
adventure pack 

RuneQuest 

LAND OF 
NINJA 



Role-Playing Supplement 
Hardback, E1 0.95, 144pp 

rth samurai wamors 

If undertaking great deeds m 

I the service of their Shogun 

f torda and the fearsome 

ninia perlofming acts of 

espionage and assassination, the 

Land or the Rising Sun makes a 

ftne setting 

Far- Eastern RPGs - best- 
known currentty is FGU'S BvShidO 
- have been around for years, so u 
was a natural Step for Avalon Hill 
to provide a Japanese supplement 
for Its RuneQuest roleplaying rules 
system , Put Land OtNinta cant be 
played without at the very least the 
baste RuneQuest rules and 
referees will almost certainly want 
Advanced RuneQuest too. 

The book - Games Workshop's 
attractively repackaged, sturdy 
hardback style - contains a 
combination of background 
material, rule changes and 
additions, adventure ideas and a 
ready-to-go scenario, all set out m 
readable fashion. 

An introduction explains that 
historical and geographical fact 
should take backseat to the fun of 
roleplaying. Then details from over 
tan centuries of Japanese history 
are given for referees to pick and 
choose whatever elements appeal 
to them, mixing in aspects of 
fantasy such as magic and 
unearthly creatures m whatever 
way they wish: however Land Of 
Ntnja can be used as the basis of 
an historically accurate campaign 
if sufficient effort goes into 
preparation. 

The Japanese caste system 
imposes many restrictions on 
what character types would 
realistically adventure together , so 
usuaty everyone belongs to the 
samurai: soldiers, priests and 
courbenj who directly serve the 
ruling lords. But there are rules for 
lower castes too. The versatile 
fluneOuea* previous-experience 
system is used, so players quickly 
and realistically generate 
characters of reasonable 
competence and knowledge 



The book also introduces some 
new skills - such as Disguise and 
the fast-draw technique. lai|utsu - 
gives rules governing weapons 
such as the katana, |o stick and 
shunken, and details the 
languages thai characters will be 
familiar with 

For me. Ki skills are one of the 
most interesting new features - 
one that referees might like to 
carry over to RuneQuest fantasy 
campaigns A type of magical 
ability denving from great 
individual skill exercised in a single 
burst of activity, often after lengthy 
preparations. Ki is only developed 
by PCs attaining mastery (90% 
ability) of a skill. A character with 
such a level gains the 
corresponding Ki at 5%, and may 
increase it by experience and 
training. 

To use a Ki skill the adventurer 
spends a magic point before 
attempting their skill roll, ff the dice 
score is less than the Ki 
percentage the Ki succeeds, the 
effects of which depend on the 
particular skill involved; a 
craftsman, say. may produce a 
vase which is nol only beautiful but 
possesses minor magical 
properties; the Ceremony skill can 
be used to enhance the Ki ability, 
representing hours of meditation 
and mental preparation 

Of more use to adventuring 
types are the attack Ki: success 
with a hand weapon Ki skill allows 
another attack to be made at once 
and shuriken Ki lets the user throw 
multiple throwing Stars 

simultaneously, leading to a 
devastating flurry of blows. Ail In 
all the Ki skills allow experienced 
characters to occasionally 
perform outstandingly impressive 



feats, and bring an element of 
magic into the game that is totally 
separata from run-of-the-mill spell 
casting. 

More conventional RuneQuest 
magic is covered, however; the 
book gives an overview of 
Japanese religion and its deities, 
and includes details of which 
RuneQuest Divine and Spur! 
magic spells would be available 
from which temple, Avalon Hill 
clearly assume most referees will 
base campaigns in a fantasy 
Japan where magic is common, 
but those who went a real world' 
game could dispense with speii- 
casting without unbalancing the 
system. 

The bulk of Ihe background 
malarial is in two sections on 
samurai and ninia cultures - two 
very distinct societies The 
importance of honour to the 
samurai is reflected in the HON 
characteristic, which characters 
can increase by particularly 
distinguished actions and 
decrease by violations of the code 
Of honour. HON is important irt 
interactions between samuraj, 
giving a direct measure of the 
respect a character commands. 
Additionally, there are some 
entertaining rules for the effects of 
ateChcJ.asadomiSSiOnfrommariy 
games! Overindulgence can lead 
to an adventurer getting sick, 
passing out. or If really 
unfortunate, both 1 

For mnjas a selection of tucks 
and devices used by these 
legendary spies and assassins are 
provided, including special skills 
such as Nawanukeiutsu, 
(escaping from bonds) and 
gadgets such as air bags lor hiding 
under water. The book rounds oft 
with a bestiary of Japanese 
mythological creatures, 

gamesmastering tips and a good 
20-paoe adventure for a group of 
samurai characters, A very worthy 
and honlabJe addition to any 
HurwGbssf player's collection. 



104/1 24 TGW TX 008.7-88 




WARHAMMER 
CAMPAIGN 

Role-Playf ng Supplement 
Hardback, £10,99, 138pp plus 
pull-out colour map 

This is not a new scenario peck, 
but a repackaging m a single 
hardback edition of the first two 
Wamammer adventures Games 
Workshop released - The Enemy 
Within and Shadows Over 
Bogenhafen The first mostly 
contains background material for 
the Empire, largest country of the 
Warhammer Old World and 
bearing a certain swniianfy to 
medieval Germany. 

The scenario itself in this first 
section, Mistaken identity - short 
and easily, completed in an 
evening's play - is intended to 
introduce new people to 
roleplaying and also lead 
adventurers into the action of the 
next section. It's entertaining and 
clearly -written to make the 
referee's job easy, and some 
pregenerated PCs are provided to 
save even more time, 

Most action m the pack takes 
place in Shadows Over 
Bogenhafen: our heroes uncover 
a very sinister plot ki the charming 
town of the title, with a tnp through 
the sewers and a visit to the fair 
amongst the distractions, all in all 
taking probably two or three 
sessions to play through PCs 
surviving the perils of Bogenhafen 
can continue in subsequent 
Games Workshop releases Death 
On The Re>k (available now) and 
Power Behind The Throne (out 
soon). 

My overall reetmgs about 
Warhammer Campaign ate mined: 
the book is well-produced and 
easy to follow, the Empire 
background and Bogenhafen 
descriptions (including a large 
pull-out map) could be useful for 
running your own adventures as 
well as this one, but the linearity of 
plol makes life very difficult for a 
referee whose players try to tackle 
problems m unusual ways and 
coma up with angles the designers 
haven't thought of 

A useful campaign pack, then, 
for players/referees comparatively 
new to roleplaying. But referees 
may occasionally either have to 
curtail players' freedom of action 
severely to keep them following 
the plotlme. Or else Ignore the 
preplanned plot and improvise 
desperately with little or no help 
from the book Oh, and beware 
those Bogenhafen sewers, or a 
messy end may befall you 








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You are the Ice cool leader of a gang of drug crazed 

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toughest and most notorious gang In the city. 




FREE! 



SEND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS TODAY FOR YOUR FREE TRIAL OF 
IT'S A CRIME THE WORLDS MOST POPULAR PLAY-BY-MAIL GAME 

Write to: - 



SUITABLE FOR ADULTS ONLY 



KJC GAMES, PO BOX 11, CLEVELEYS. BLACKPOOL. LANCS FY5 2UL. 




MBtmi*" 



*ggs CLASSIFIEDS 



Your small ads are reaching over 200,000 other readers in Britain and around the world! 



FOR SALE 



520 STFM Atari 1 Mbyte Drive. Too 
much software to list, but worth 
many hundreds £480 No offers. 
Bastldon(02&8}i;640?1 after 6pm 



CBM 64, C2N tape deck, books. 

joysticks. AH in perfect condition. 
Plus £300 original software, as 
new. Value £550. Need quick sate 
selling for £i 30. Phone Gary 0603 
|8108*1 after Neighbours. 



I CBM 128. datasene, over 100 

games, books, magazines, 2 
joysticks. Currati Speech plus 
Action Replay MK4 cartridge. 6* 
months old. still boxed. Worth over 
£500 Bargain at £350 ono. Tel. 
026^412135- 



CBM 84. datasette, joysiic-k. 
music maker, magazines. C200 
worth of software including World 
Games. OulRurs. Undium.Sanxion 






plus more. All original games. 
Everything in excellent condition 
- manuals Worth £450 but will 
sell for £150' Ring 01 635 9392 
after 6pm, 



Atari 520 STM. hi -res monitor. 2 
disk dnves, 100+ games, Fasl 
Basic cartridge, 20 blank disks, 
dust cover, mouse mai. disk box 
+ magazines, £400 ono, Call 
Darren (0430) 440735. 7 Pochard 
Close, Newport. North 

Wumberside 



Spectrum *2 128K computer, 
Kempstcm joystick interlace. 
Konix Speedking joystick. Over 
£345 worth of software, all good 
titles Worth £500. bargain at 
£145 Tel (0443) 451305 after 
4pm. 



Amstrad CPC 664, dish drive, 
colour monitor, loysiicks, tape 
recorder, over £500 original 
software including MOll. GAC, 
Over 40 magazines, books, Total 
new C900+ Sell £400 ono. 
Consider P/X STVAmiga. Pristine 
condition, Pnone- (0427) 872753. 



48K Spectrum. 28 games all 
CRASH Smashed, Competition 
Pro joystick and interface. Boxed 
wnh all leads. In excellent 
condition. Worth over £320. yours 
for only £125 ono. Ring: 01 733 
5837 after 7pm 



CBM 64. datasene Cheetah 
Maori l+, joystick. Light Pen. 
Currah Speech module, games 

including Gunship and Stealth 
Fighter, all originals- Good 
condition. Quick sale £100- 
Phorw; Scott on (0323) 846906 
after 6pm, 



CBM 64, 1541 disk drive. 2 
datasettes. 1 Euromax joystick, 
over £400 of software, several 
tuank disks. Worth over £800. 
£275 ono. Tel: (0272) 556473 after 
4,30pm m weekdays please. 
(Excellent condition}. 



Sega Light Phasor worth £45. 
selling for £20. Also 14 cartridges 
including OutRun. Fantasy Zone. 
Afterburner. Rocky. Selling for 
under £13 each. Karl on 01 863 
2025 after 6pm. 



Sega for £200 with Gun. Rocky. 
Bank Panic, OutRun. World 
Soccer, Hang-On Brand new. sWl 
in box. Phone: 057 920 9347 



Spectrum Low 

SpeeDrum Music Machine, £300 
worth software, tape recorder. 
Ugh! Pen, interface, joysticks, 
magazines Will sell separately 
Bargain £300 Write 10 R Shaw, 
1 1 Fulshaw Crescent, Ayr, 
Ayrshire, KA8 OHO or Tel: (0292) 
265278 



Sega Master System 4 months 
old. with 12 games including 
Space Hamer, OutRun After 
Burner, and Rocky. Light Phasor 
and Sega joystick £200. Contact 
Jusim, Westcliff-On-Sea. Essex, 
Tel: (0702 353430 



Atari STFM boxed, stx months 
old, Under guarantee Includes 
Over £500 software including 
Dungeon Master. Otds. Gamer 
Command, Rolling Thunder Also 
Competition Pro joysitck. 
keyboard cover, mouse 
Everything perfect condition Only 



I THE AUTUMN COMPUTER ART SHOW 

™ Alt the details were In last month's TGM, but we promised to repeat the form for the benefit of artists 
I working to a leter deadline. Don't forget, closing date for entries Is August 18! 

| I would like my computer art to be considered for entry Newsfield's Autumn Computer Art Exhibition at the PC Show, Earls Court. 

| Hum 

1 






Phone Number 

Number o< paces submitted and compute* 

an 



i state the titles of your SMbnutted pieces tdetote draiu'eass as inapplicable}, followed by ihe FILENAME and Utility used Any speoai trtstryctKjn* for towing or 
UH ot serf-designed utilities should be written out on a aeparaie shoot. 



J 
♦ 

I 

I 

I 

I AtmJMNCOl 



Postcode . 



SmoMh 



7JI arm ewer 18 

Q I em under ta. and my legal guardum has sgnedbetaw 

I haw read the conditions of entry printed overieai end agree to abtde by them 

Entrant's ^nature (or legal guardianj 



• D3 



Tfiei 
Title 2 
Tit* 3 



<di»k/C*»4» 
ldrSk/C*SS> 



Filename: 
Filename: 



Utirty 
Utirty 
Utility 






(disk/cass: - Filename 

l lave enclosed a stamped addressed envelope for the return of dnk/cas&efle 

' I enclose extra payment for return package to oe sent recorded/registered 
Plea** *n»ur* the form la correctly filled out, thai your ca***tt**/dl*M ar* all labelled eorr«tty a* por instruction* on th* rovoree of tfeii form, 
art* that you ha** atgnad th* form, Th*n **nd It, together with any ■oporat* enclosure*. d)*k| t) or cat*«tt*(a) to: 

COMPUTER ART SHOW, NEWSRELD PUBLICATIONS, P0 BOX 10, LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE SYS IDE 

TGM TX 008:7-88107/124 



I 



•*> 



£340 Blackpool (0253) 890048. 



Atari 520 STFM. compJele with 
joystick, extension lead and over 
£700 worth o* the latest software. 
Worth over El 000. Only £450 ono. 
Tel; (0842) 3222 for details. Please 
nng after 5pm and as*? for Simon, 



Atari 520 STFM Games worth 
over £150. joystick, mouse and 
mat, dust cover, 10 blank disks 
and PD disks, magazines, disk 
box. £290. still under guarantee. 
Tel' (0272) 833292 after 6pm, 



CBM 64. 1 541 disk drive, two tape 
decks (one poor Quality). £6O0 
software, Action Replay MK3. 
joyst>c*. blank disks end 
cassettes. £350 ono. Phone: 
40646) 682498 and ask for Damian. 



Amstrad CPC colour, disk drive, 
software (Worth £800) will sell for 
£350 ono. Ring (0474) 320118 



CMS 64 C2N datacassette Over 



SM50 software games including 
Platoon, Black Lamp, 720. Star 
Wars. Solid Gold. Kikstart II Will 
sell tor around £175 ono. if 
interested tel: 063 087 2584. 



Amiga Software for sale. 
Barbarian, Xenon. Wizball. 
Vampires Empire, Ferrari Formula 
One. Barbarian (Palace j. Tetns. 
Prices up to C 1 2. All originals. Tel: 
Haywards Heath (0444) 413687 
ask for Robert. Evenings only 



48K Speccy tape recorder, 
speech unit, magazines including 
CRASH, lots of games and utilities 
like GAC. Driller, Bubble Bobble. 
Phone Ian on 01 946 7317 
evenmgs. Cost price £500. save 
£1 50 atC 350 ono. Now! 



CBM 64, datasette, 55 games. 
joystick Approximate cost £550. 
Sell for £175? ono. Sega 2 
joysticks . Hang On , Space Hamer. 
Quartlet. Fantasy Zone. 

Approximate cost £175 sell lor 
£95' ono. Sell together £2501 Tel: 
(061)3360455. 



35 WORDS FOR ONLY £2.501 



THE GAMES MACHthC PauOm niirflt* are ygmr bwcqgl oppomrety In raaJi 

Just m «i Vm tonnMMrMJ anoo«« w#l ya* £2 SO B*y*n*>l, ttwouew portal or dc 
rj» p^fB* 1 ^ to NTWHTIf I n LTD. Flwtocapt** of 1*» four, are accepiatne. 



TH6 C WM EB IWC HHe ri itdl r Oa » * Wd S+Cfcon m not Ofm to tnO* t* «iwcm 

■ liiiili m ii In if r wiiumb hibj mail Tfu h—Hn jg ■■ wff p»4.iipiili« i WANTED FOfi 
SAtE. SWAPLWe, USEA OnOUPS, PEN PALS. FANZINES **! EVENTS C*AnY<Tcr<**f 

■ T f*f iiuimiun ii 3S mk 

* Tfs3sw»si«tapwlDlniM>tiainmar(aala(tiivlnan 

■ Sm>« m**Mb» t*Trmw ip Ttwtm » iu c n imj* 

■ "*• #dtby fiHf^rVA ttw oqW to FdiiM Ads vrtwft do net comply w* 

jracdcE. or WFtaoK could be r*m\m Mail m «ncouTBfpig Kiftwm piracy. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


TOM READER CLASSIFIEDS 

Send to THE GAMES MACHINE READER CLASSIFIEDS. PO Box 10. Ludlow. 
Shf opahrr* SVfl IDE 

Nam 


1 








Wanted "For Saw S«ap*n* r>*» Pate QUIbT Gnotos Tarvnw 
~EvantsDiflfy "TitufJamm ■ 
M*1twxa <rf parmwil Cft*quo Po*talOroW 

A-*.* jr«v aO««rHMn<«n4 r*i« <** word p« ton, «tm3 tociud* rmrm. ■fldr*M and prvra 

iu"*«» it you w»fil ihom pr<ni«t 
















i 














i 
i 














i 
i 












i 

i 














i 
i 
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i 







Am s trad CPC464 colour monitor, 
£250 games. OutRun. Buggy Mog 
7, HltPaks etc. 2 joysticks. £40 
magazines, Amtix. AA. C&VG, 
Desk worth £30. Around £250. 
Ring: 01 445 2735 after 4.30pm 



Nintendo Entertainment System 
with six cartridges, including 
Super Mario Bros, and joystick 
also C8M 64 with sixty games, 
daiasefte. joystick and 

magazines. £225 ono the lot or 
swap for STFM Phone; 02612 
2965 and ask for Mike 



PEN PALS 



6128 Pen Pals wanted, send 
letters to David, Hiiihead, 
Tarbolton, Mauchline, Ayrshire 
KA5 5NT Amiga Pen Pals: Sascha 
Grebe, Amstem 10, 5419 
Ftaubach. West Germany. 



Amiga User wishes to swap hints 
etc with other users world wide. All 
letters answered, please write to: 
Flex 14, Blantyre Avenue, Rise 
Park. Nottingham NG5 5DN, As 
soon, as possible, lhanx. 



Amiga Pen Pals wanted irom all 
over the world, Send letters to. 
Andy Johnston, 56 Avenue Vivian. 
Fencehouses, Houghton-Ls- 
Spring, Tyne 4 Wear DH4 6HY 



SWAPLINE 



Atari ST owner will swap 
Barbarian (Psy gnosis) for 
Obliterates and Crazy Cars for 
Gamer Command. Phone: 01 732 
1 129 ask for Jensmey- 



Swap or sell Spectrum 1 28K. over 
100 games, two joysticks. 

interlace 1, microdrive, pnnter, 
tape recorder. For Alan ST. Amiga 
or C325. Phone: Midhurst (073061) 

2496 evenings 



Swap 46K Spectrum and all the 
extras for good condition Sega 



of 



and games, Total coat 
Spectrum and extras £320. Could 
accept Nintendo and games 
Phone 061 431 0506 and ask for 
Steve, 



EVENTS DIARY 



MSX LINK EXPO on August 14th 
at Market Deeping, Leisure 
Centre, Nr. Peterborough. Cambs 
Admission only 50p aduri. half 
pnee under 14s Tel: (0775) 3433 
lor details 



USER CROUPS 



CAN YOU program m Z80, 6502 
or 68000? Would you like to wnte 

games, utilises etc, and start a 
User Group, if so then phone 
AlisteronBantl5333, 



MISCELLANEOUS 



IS LIFE being a real bummer? 
Then try 'World Of Dreadiock . a 
role playing so-fi PBM. Send 
chegue/PO; £2.50 for rule book, 
start-up and 2 free turns to: 
NN Robinson. Tree Tops' Red 
Lane. Kerulworth, Warfcs. CVS 
tPB. 



DARKFIRE PBM Enter the 
realms of fantasy adventures. 
Sorcery and sword come 
together, for more information 
wnte to: M Bam field, 64 Linnet 
Dnve, Chelmsford. Essex CM2 
BAF. or phone: (0245 267203). 



WHITE DWARF Issues 66, 69, 86. 
89. 90 - 102. £20 (includes Re- 
issues 1 - 13 of Warlock £12 
(includes P4P). Phone Jamie on 01 
776 0036 Fridays and Saturdays 
7pm, 



MEGAPRIX and Aussie Rules 
Two great PBMs from Jasper soft, 
onfy 50p per turn Megaprix is 
motor racing game. Aussie Rules 
is just violent! n For details send 
SAE to: M Sims, 76 Mount fload. 
Canterbury, Kent CT1 lYF. 



UNIT: CORPORAL JONLAN 
MORALE; 166 
STAMINA: 215 
ACTION POINTS: 42 
CONSTITUTION: 31 
WEAPON: M4000 AUTO GUN 
TELt (0279) 30128 



*" I f*~ I — *r f — "/ f v 




TARGET GAMES LIMITED 



108l24TGrv1 TX 008:7-88 




SHOPPING 



««•"**£ 



" SHOPPING 




rrS FINALLY OON E TO MIS 
HEAD... 

This blue ' baseball" style 
CAP with white embossed 
THE GAMES MACHINE logo 
cant help everybody's 
appearance, but el least it 
advertises your good taste 
TQM CAP 
OFFER C3.9S, T036H 

■TOP... 

your favourite mags from dis- 
appearing. Hoi oft the press 
comes the new TGM BINDER 
with that lovely brown leather 
look and embossed gold 
logos. Each binder comes with 




plastic issue number stickers. 
TQM BINDER 
OFFER £4.00. T037H 



tUAOMAX JOY SOAHO 

Thai ikw -Lontrol cortaole pro»n)o» you 
Hiiri *»nrv ikmCM b*ng and mavamsnl 
optior Oir»ct(0r*lcef1[rtjl « l«rttCt4tHt 
batwaan n wjLM i M cn- icIBfi py»tick and 
t»t> flam— pafldlaa Fmno can ba aclt- 
vtttd with two larue Hr* button* ■nd Auto 
Fra faatunrtvSrlabl* fr*au*ncy Httjri0 
Tmo IfQi rndteal* llnng action. Tha untt 
a] cemKit4w I 7 m*tn» long gatola. 
Smta&Mj tor Commodore VC- 
».C6*.C12S,CiaSDandAMlOA5(lO 

eunoMAx joy board 
oFFEma.mtt30H 



KOMIX SfVaDKIHO 

Tn» joyvtKk ttial actually run your hand, 
with ■ fir» button angled lor youf Inggar 
lirtow 10 arm™ «*eu>aio rugn- i paad 
act km SdIhJ itM) bf M*pf0Of ihtrt wntti 
naal clicking Bound kw avary poartlon 
mgnHumaki 
KONIX SPROKINQ 
OFFER 10,». RHP 1 1 99. T133H 



■Phi aacaUanl nyyilick <h1 ur*» mteiQ- 
iwitcn dif actional control and lira action. 
Au*qut virttbiatiraton contra* Mow* 
ih* ua*r lo adjuat t*» dbaooon control la 
**tra aanartrv*, normal and am. A wida 
b«M and Iokjt *ue«on Cue* proWd* good 
lab*- top operation 
POWtRPLAY CRUISER 
OFFTBCS.W. t'31H 




No soft background 
music, no deep-piled 
carpets, no tasteful 
decor, no dazzling spot- 
lights, no manicuring 
shop assistants, just hot 
up-to-date merchandise, 
fast service and low 
bucks, that's TGM SHOP- 
PING. Whether top games 
software, high-tech joys- 
ticks or designer T-Shirts 
or just simply 
dustprotective keyboard 
covers, our TGM SHOP- 
PING crew will despatch 
efficiently and fast. The 
incredibly low prices 
include VAT and postage 
& packing. Now go for the 
TGM SHOPPING 
spree . . . 




i 




HfiohdUfM' ■ 'jprdraaponaaanduPra 
•wrartrvM 1 1 „ . -*n accuracy from mat 

-*"**jrjbfw<v<!rj»*gr. Idea* lor left 
«n<J iir/ii >i#fMS (*»y 1 yncOfd 
EUROMAX PflOFf SSiONAL 
OFFER 1&.H U33n 



■UROHAX PROnUKMUL AUTO 



A» m* quaaty o* in* PROFESSIONAL. 
wfih in* added tww oi it* AUtO FR6 

optMXMn^ynol work on iorn* Computer 

Meajaeat 

EUROMAK PHOFESSIONA^AUTO. 

FlfiE 

OFFCR 1B.HS. I1J4H 



dynamic* co*tr*rrmow ho 



dynamics c ome nrn wi ***o 

SCO0<( r l**r1 

Trwrtaignar joystick with MM-1tvougri 

body 

DYNAMICS COMPETTTTOH PHO WW 

Wtarl 

C*S£B i*joo, RRP 1 5-9S. T19GH 



Fe**ijiMirad*a*ialrtyrnc/oa«Mcn**, 

du*l ftf* button*, rotMtt *t**l *Wt and 

rubber ratum lor tmuOth control and 

longer Irfs E rtr a long I 6m cord 

DYHAJMK5 COfclPTriTKVN P«f> SOW 

(norm*!) 

OFFER 13.40. RHP I4H T13SH 




SHOPPING 
HARDWARE 
■^ HUSH-80 



THE SILENT PORTABLE PRINTER 

The HUSH-80 from Ergo Systems is a smalt portable 
thermal printer, quiet in operation, which is ideally 
suited for home use, office back-up and everywhere 
when NLQ isn't required. Fast and efficient - no pre- 
| tensions to anything else. Easy to operate, quick to 
I load and simple to service. A friend to the budget con- 
scious, a professional product at an economic price 



OFFER 
£75.00 



FAST-didirectional text prim- 
ing al a qutck 80 characters per 
second, 

QU IET— Less than 56 db noise 
(in case you need To hear a pin 
drop). 

VERSATILI-Under control 
from your computer, print line 
can be set For double size 
c h sr act ers a M per line, of hal f 
size characters at 1 60 per fine. 
POflTABLIi-Standard unit 
less than 3 pounds m weight 



including 90fl.paper roll. 
LOW COST GRAPHICS, 
LIN ESP ACINO-Can be 

programmed to 4,&,6.6 or 9 
lines per inch. 
ECONOMICAL-Uses low 
cost thermal roll paper, Sharp 
tear bar permits economy tear- 
otf of paper lengths - Use only 
what you need. No ribbons lo 
run out or replace. 
RE LIABLE -A, full 3 month 
limited factory warranty, 




P»aM (Mtg, 500, Mm ST. PG-oonv 

pat*«, Am*t»wJ CPc, 
Senas (Commodore C84/ 1 2 m 



•#*clflc#tl&*v 



PRINTING Mt TMOD: 

ThBTfrw Art main* 
MWTMO FORMAT, 

<S jt ? Dol Mat" « BO columns 



Alphanmnarie and tnumattanaJ Charac- 
tarsal 



K i,i 



PRiHT DtMCTIOH: 

Bidirectional whon pnnling !e"l 

'urn prmlirtfl graph&a 

CHAJUCTmn aizai 

Standard SC CJwacloF* per Una 

Ej^Mndtd/Ooubtt wwir- 40 Owkws 

par In* 

Condanaad 1 00 CtwBcton e» fiw 



DM AddnMMDto. 4SOCo*wmn* 7 Oo»* 

Thermal floeof Fan paper. S 5 Incftn 

wida 

30 rrartf Saty-»ood ti t u r a 



220VAC to Traratonrn*- 
PriMar Input 9VA.C 

EROO MUSH- 90 PRINTER 
(IRXlUOIMO POWIH SUPPLY. 
CARLE AMD 1 ROLL OP PAPER} 
Omit tTB.OO INCL VAT AMD PAP 

CDMMDIWRE C«4M 2« VCRSKM 

COOET03TM 

AMtTRAfi CK VERSIOM C O0€ 

TQS9H 

AJHVQA AGO VEJUKMa. CODE TKMH 

ATARI ST VERSION 1306 TD40H 

PC W«Wf}N . 30C TOJ IH 

Pl«» alio* upioift d~y* f«r oothr- 



S SHOPPING 
< HARDWARE 

s ~ 




AMIGA STEREO SOUND KIT 

Are you using your Amiga correctly? Have you forgotten that the 
Amiga can deliver ear-splitting stereophonic aoundeffects and 

music ? Well then, connect your Amiga up to your powerful STEREO 
system with the help of this comprehensive 4-piece kit containing; 



STfRIO phono socket to DIM co nt actor 

llMrluMl (phono to S-pin 180 OIN 

convenor) 

AMHA ITUHO SOUND KIT 

wren i.m tlmjh 



• I UNO 0.2S In Jock to Unm uckat 
Iptulmmmianmt O.iS In ) K k to audio/ 
•*rp*»en« eveket con T ert*r) 



SPECTRUM-3 



k ~ art! 




LEADS 




tTUlO phono phis to phono pica 

c.j.1. | Am> D » .uoio output to MCI input) 



STEREO phono *OCk*l 10 0.25 In lockot 
■hurl cabli {phono to lonr* >l a M o JURe 

HKknl 



■ 



Link your SPECTRUM *3 to your cassette recorder and gain access , 
to your large collection of Spectrum 46 tape software, 

SPCCTAUMO CAtaCTTI LEAD* 

o#rea a.M td+jh 





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IBP ■*■'» INHM MADiceykM 

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TIZ7M 

5PEC**Via cm* OFFER 0.44 
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An absolutely free EUROMAX JOY STAR 
joystick worth £9.95 is waiting for every 
reader who decides to subscribe to THE 
GAMES MACHINE for twelve great 
Issues. Yes, If you act now, we will send 
you this superb EUROMAX micros witch- 
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to encounter in modem computer 
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The EUROMAX JOY STAR is 

an excellent mieroswrtch- 
action Joystick featuring preci- 
sion top and front fire buttons 
and Auto Fire, it can be oper- 
ated handheld or can be 
mounted on the table via vice- 
grip suction cups. JOY STAR 
connects to any Atari -compat- 
ible joystick port and will there- 
fore operate with most games 
computers. Auto Fire may not 
work on certain systems. 





NUMBERS 



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Overview 1 Compel*** n ih« Momn< Tha 
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PLAY BY MAIL 




THE GAMES MACHINE'S regular 

Play By Mail column 



Our TGM street gang is consolidating its 
position In KJC's It's A Crime, so for this 
month's column we will concentrate on 
new releases - and return to crime next 
month. 



DARK BLADES - A LIVING ADVENTURE 

Standard Games PGM 



Pieviewed *i TGM007, this 
exciting, well -presented game 
rewards a closer look. 

The scenario concerns the 
exceptionally bloody war between 
Humans and MorvOgrea (half 
Man, halt Ogre). Players may 
cnoose to be either but not arty of 
the other races - there are more 
than ten - and then choose 
between Traders and Warriors. 
Traders are given a village to 
develop, with population and 
momJe being key indicators of 
success. A Trader's 

responsibilities include choosing 
what goods to Produce and 
setting their Price (too high and 
goods wont sell, too low and you 
won't make a profit). Feeding your 
people (too Tittle; starvation, too 
much: HO reserve for next year). 
Harvesting {the later it's left the 
bigger the Crop - and risk of 
d>sastsr) and Hiring mercenaries 
Toman mute trams for Trading with 
other milages Another unique 
abiity of Traders is sending 
messages, such as advertising 
low -price goods 

ThilTy-icat9mndYiyMtXTW>CtiYmb<lKp*ck&yiny tor Dark Blades 



The success of a Warrior 
necessarily depends on drfferent 
skills and will be judged by the 
strength, and quafrty of the group 
a player builds up. Commands 
available include Allying yourself 
with other Warrior groups or with a 
single Trader, setting seven 
different Movement 'attitudes' 
from Charge to Coward, Abandon 
a battle-weakened player (this 
affects group morale}. Set Battle 
Retreat Percentage (when this is 
reached your group withdraws) 
and Individual Character Orders. 
The latter covers a broad 
spectrum of commands and the 
number you're allowed varies with 
how many individuals you have 
managed to recrurt. Individuate 
can be ordered to Use items iie 
armour). Lean a Skill, Give, Drop 
Or Examine an item and Recruit 
characters. Characters can be 
described by as many as eight 
different factors, from Loyalty to 
Charisma, 

All movement, whether by 
Warrior groups or Trader mule 
trains, takes place- on a hex map 







which allows travel in six 
directions over 21 types of terrain 
(some requiring boats.) Each hex 
is 5 rmles across at the widest 
point and the number of hexagons 
you can move per turn depends 
on the terrain type and the average 
Of a group's individuals 
movement points. Rather man 
Simply move X number of 
hexagons in a turn, days are spin 
into six time periods. Battles 
operate along similar lines so 
arrangements can be made for 
allies to attack at different times of 
day. A factor affecting both types 
of action is Line Of Sight Vision 
which means what your 
characters can see depends on 
their current environment. 

The aim of all players is to 
complete ten tasks before taking 
on a final quest. The first player to 
complete a quest wins the game, 
free participation in another game 
and a chance to win the El .000 
Golden Dragon. H all this seems a 
bit ambitious for a new PBM 
company you can be assured that 
(he programming is in the 
experienced hands of Stewart 
Green His previous works include 
the PSS computer titles Annate Of 
R&m& and Pegasus Bridge His 
Qark Blades program is run on an 
Atari 1040 ST with hard disk 

If you would like to play this 
living adventure' the startup 
package is available from 
Standard Games PBM, Arton 
Hot&e, Station Road, Kings 
Langley, Hurts WD4 8LF The 
pack costs £5, but ail turns 
thereafter cost a E1.25 flat rate, 
even it you've got 40 characters 
1 40 individual order*- 



CREEPHOUSE 

Project Basilisk 

An interesting new release from 
the makers of Trott's Bottom is a 
game with a diatinciiy Rocfty 
Horror sense of humour. Despite 
this, however, the game's format 
is closely modelled after It's A 
Crime with the amount of form 
tilling minimised so as to appeal to 
the 12- IS computer gamer 
market. 

Another factor designed to 
attract this market is '3-D 
Adventure- Vision' which has bean 
very much Inspired by the Knight 
Lone 'Filmation' style of computer 
garni ia Whnt this means is that 
objects within the three Hoars oJ 
Greephause can be picked up. 
moved around, hidden and even 



slacked The amount of objects 
that car* be earned varies with their 
weight, so some may need to 
hidden fn the furniture, like Spy vs 
Spy The difference is that there 
are 33 other adventurers trying to 
solve the adventure at the same 
time as you The computer acting 
umpire for afl this activity rs an 
Amstrad PC I5f2 expanded to 
640X RAM with a 32 Mbyte 
Winchester Hard Disk Card 

The objective of Cr&sphousr is 
to escape from d by frightening 
away monsters guarding 
staircases to the upper floors 
Most important factor in the game, 
therefore, is your Fright Level, set 
at 1 2 to start - you get sent lb the 
graveyard if it fails betow 3 A more 
traditional way of vrsftmg the 
graveyard is by tosmg too much 
btpod, all loo easy in a house run 
by Dr Amy Cola, who allows €0 
monsters free room and board 

Before you get snobby about 
such company, however, you 
should remember thai you're no 
model of normalcy either stand 
before a window with «n sight of 
the full moon and you can 
BECOME a Wuit, and you can 
transtorm into a Creep or Sftme at 
any time Each creature has 
different capabilities - Wulfs can 
leap portcufises for instance 
Transformations are greeted with 
the house's creatures shouting 'X 
is SLIME 1 

As one of the more bizarre 
Kntghl Lore 'clones'; Cr&sphouse 
provides a welcome, rf somewhat 
limned alternative to games Wee 
it's A Crime. The address to write 
reject BaslMak , PO Bo* S4 t 
Sheemesa, Kmnt, ME12 30U 
Greepnouso's starter pack 
(ruTeooo*. maps and two free 
turns) is free, but I urns thereafter 
cosl 90p finch 

Another Protect Bat, 
featuring 3D Adventure Vision is 
Battle Crab, planned to be 
released on September i An SF 
game, we'll tali you more in tuft her 
issues. 

THE GAMES MACHINE is 
always delighted to hear from 
PBM addicts, end from any PBM 
companies- CRASH was voted 
as providing the beat PBM 
coverage of any magazine after 
Flagship » the magazine may be 
TGM's stablemate, but wo 
reckon we ought to take that 
coveted accolade over, so your 
input is extremely valuable 
Write to: POSTE HASTE. THE 
GAMES MACHINE, PO Box t0. 
Ludlow, Shropshire SYd WB. 



TGM TX 008:7-88118/124 



s 



THE pAMES W^CHlfir.sRobirt Candy yets down 
nttee ef e4*trofiie"d3uiJfn3 with a tirant 
rt (fliltiy 'from MiceoMusion* 
Hrfcetefl Hi the UK by Apf Cvivffotr 



S 




c 



ould anyone hope 10 tetter 
DetuMePamt li (Electronic Arts} 
as the standard by which Amiga 
art utilities shouti be judged^ It 
you asked me yesterday, I 
would nave doubted it- Today I have 
changed my mind. The reason is 
Mlcrolllustons's Photon Paint, 

Programmed by 8eib0 Soft. 
Pfjofon Paffifs use Of HAM (Hold And 
Modify], which lets all the Amiga's 
4066 colours be displayed onscreen 
simultaneously, is only one technique 
working with many other well-crafted 
elements to make this the best Amiga 
art package I have seen. 

The work area gives a first, clean, 
uncluttered impression with all the 
Brush and Colour Palette menus 
located at the top of the screen, This 
menu contains a 64-coiour palette 
(spirt into four rows of 16 boxes}, a 
selection of eight brushes varying m 
size and shape and 1 4 basic drawing- 
tool icons (most of them, sensibly. 
identical to those used in DetuxoPatnt 
if.} 

A BRIEF SUMMARY OF 
THE TOOLS 

Dotted and Continuous Freehand 
tools are now art utility standards: 
Dotted leaves an incomplete line 
following the cursor's path, 
Continuous Freehand leaves a solid 



Robin Candy's Tmovrtl: 
cr**t*d to tost out Photon 
Rwot's fwttut W3 



Lasso is a gem 
of a command 
allowing full 
exploitation of 
the brush man- 
ipulation com- 
mands. 



line. Straight Line draws a solid line 
from one specified point to another 
using the standard click-drag- release 
method. Curve acts in a similar 
manner: specify the curve's start 
point, drag the cursor to its end point 
and create an arc between the points 
by moving the mouse. The curve isn't 
fixed until the left mouse button is 
pressed, so you can experiment until 
you're happy with the resort. 

Three icons design Rectangles 
Circles and Efipses Again click- 
drag-release is used- The icon for 
each shape is split in two. one half for 
outlines, the other draws the shape 
and fills it with the currently selected 
foreground colour. And there are three 
methods for filling enclosed areas. 
Background fills with the currently 
selected foreground Colour. 

Boundary fills an area defined by 
pixels of a specified colour, covering 
all other colours within the boundary 
area. Free Shape fills an area defined 
by a freehand-drawn outline, covering 
all other colours within the boundary; 
you specify foreground colour and 
draw the shape you want filled- This is 
excellent, because irregular shapes 
can be drawn and filled all in one 
command. 

Scissor/Lasso is equivalent to 
grab and block commands found on 
many utilities. Scissor uses click- 
drag- release to specify a rectangular 
area which can be picked upend used 
like a brush. But ell too often the shape 
you want to grab isn't nicely 
rectilinear, which can make 
manipulation almost impossible, 
especially when the screen is choc-a- 
bkre with different colours. Lasso is a 
gem of a command allowing full 
exploitation of the brush manipulation 
commands Exact portions of the 
screen can be picked up by tracing a 
freehand line around the desired 
'brush' without the need to stick to a 
regular shape. 

Undo reverses the last action, while 
Restore Previous Brush recalls the 
last custom brush created with the 
Scissor/Lasso commands. 

Ptx creates mosaic effects, 
achieving this by averaging (he 
colours of existing pixels into larger 
pixels. The level of pixelisation can be 
increased or decreased until you are 
happy with the effect. 

Magnification changes the 
crosshair cursor to a miniature 
magnifying glass which can be 
positioned over any part of the picture 
area. Clicking the left mouse button 
calls up the magnification window 
containing the enlarged portion of the 
selected area. At the window's lower • 
right comer is a resize gadget; point 
and dick and the wmdow can be 
reseated by dragging until it's the 



required size. The window can be 
moved across the magnified image by 
clicking any one of the four directional 
arrows in the upper-right corner, and 
the degree of magnification changed 
using the plus or minus gadget 5; 
maximum magnification issatistyingly 
big. The window can also be drag- 
repositioned anywhe/e in the work 
area. 

The final tool deals with Teat. The 
Crosshair cursor is replaced w:th a 
rectangle representing the 

approximate size of the letters within 
ihe font selected. This is similar to 
Degas Eirte's method - so much 
fnendiier than the T-shaped lexl 
cursor of most utilities 



PLAYING WITH 
COLOURS 

Immediately above the Brush and 
Colour Palette menu is a while menu 
bar. Position the cursor over ii and 
press the nght mouse button and five 
options appear: Project, Prefs. Brush, 
Fonts and Mode, from which 
submenus can be accessed. 

Project contains Load. Save. Clear 
and Print options, and also the Base 
Colours submenu. Photon Paint uses 
1 6 base colours wh ich ar e mod if ied to 
produce the picture's other colours; 
therefore they must be ptcked with 
care if strange pixel messes, called 
fringes', are not to occur Base 
Colours can reside in any of the boxes 
m the palette but it makes sense to 
keep them all in the same row to avoid 
confusion. This is done by selecting 
the Current option m the Base 
Colours submenu, and all base 
colours appear in the top row of 
boxes. 

The Base Colours submenu also 
has the following options: From 
Brush copies base colours from 
brush to the colour registers. From 
Alternate copies the base colours 
from an alternate screen (rf one has 
been set up). Restore restores the 
original 16 base colours in memory 
when the current picture was first 
loaded. Default restores the program 
to 16 default colours which the 
program initially selects, Affect 
Picture, selected after the base 
colours have been altered, teHs the 
program that these are the new base 
colours. Finally. Remap Picture 
remaps your current picture using the 
colours in the first 1 6 palette boxes as 
the base colours. Unusually {and 
usefully), redefining a colour m the 
palette doesn't alter the onscreen 
colours unless Remap is used. 

The colours themselves ere chosen 
through the Extended Fast Menu. 
There are three methods; RGB, HSV 



116/124TGM TX 006:7-88 







^UXrfc; 







7 




and Colour Selection Squares Ttie 
RGB sliders ad|ust the amount of Red, 
Qraen and Blue. HSV sliders alter the 
colour's position in the spectrum 
(Hue), while Saturation and Value alter 
the amount of white and black the 
colour contains . 

For the third method three large 
colour boxes are used. These 
represent sections of a 3-D cube 
containing ail of the Amiga"s rainbow 
ol 4096 colours. By moving pairs of 
dots on the sides of the squares new 
colours can be accessed. 

Colour Spreads are defined by 
selecting two colours, the program 
working out the intermediate shades 
for you. From Spreads, dithenng is 
also provided for 

Next to the Project menu is 
Preferences. First option is Screen 
Mode, where screen resolution is 
defined and consequently the size of 
the work area selected. Photon Paint 
provides four different resolutions. 
Through Pref you can also opt to 
display the cursor's coordinates, load 
prompts and define mouse speed 
preferences, all of which can be saved 
for luture reference. 



LET'S TWIST AGAIN 

The Brush menu contains options to 
make use of the brushes picked up 
a ih the SciSSOrs/Lasso tool. Tram 
specifies whether the brush 
background colour is transparent or 
not. if not, the background colour 
overlays whatever is beneath it. 
Brushes can be flipped either 
horizontally or vertically, Selecting 
Resize pulls down yet another 
submenu with options for rescaling 
brushes Free stretches the brush to 
any desired size, while Double. 



1 A measure of 
Photon Paint's 
friendliness — 
a clock tells 
how the prog- 
ram Is pro- 
ceeding with 
the proces- 
sing. 




Powtfvi commands Sat you wrap # brush around a variety ot shapes 
and C&tQvr sttmtUoti ottrnrm thrm* methods: RQB, HSV or th* vary 
pretty colour squares 







Double Horizontal. Double Vertical. 
Halve, Halve Horizontal ■nd Halve 
Vertical all speak for themselves. 

Back on the Brush menu, Twtet 
distorts the brush image into a 3-D 
spiral, the degree of iwi sting specified 
by moving the mouse Rotate pulls 
down another submenu with 
commands to rotate the brush 
through varying degrees, Wrap On 
wraps custom brushes around a 
variety ol 3-D objects including lubes, 
cones, elipses, cubes or any 
symmetrical freehand-drawn shape 
Brushes can be bent in several 
directions using the Band command. 
One of the most powerful commands 
is undoubtedly Tilt, which places the 
brush on a 2-0 plane thai is positioned 
in 3-D. II involves fiddling around with 
a lot of variables, but the end effect Is 
well worth the effort. 

Another powerful command is 
Luminosity. Hera the direction of a 
light source governing the shading of 
a 3-D surface upon whtch the brush 
will be mapped can be specified, not 
only direction (it can be in Irani or 
behind the object!, but also the light's 
intensity. 

It's a measure ol Photon Patnfs 
friendliness, that all through these 
time-consuming features, a 
countdown clock leils you how the 
program is proceeding with the 
processing. 

The Fonts menu deals wtih all the 
vaned character sets whtch can be 
loaded. Font style and point size are 
sel e c table Characters can be 
rescaied using Brush commands if 
there isn't a character set of ihe 
required size. 

The final menu deals with drawi ng 
modes, there are Iout Normal. Blend. 
Add and Subtract, Blend combines a 
brush with whatever happens lo be 
underneath rt, Below Blend. Set 
defines the level of blending Add 
adds the current brush colour to that 
ol the background while Subtract 
does the opposite. 

HEAD AND SHOULDERS 

Any art uliiity is only really as good as 
its manual. Photon Patnrs. is one of 
the best I've had ihe pteasure of using 
Too often manuals assume the user is 
computer 'literate, never faking into 
account that n may be a first venture 
into the world of computer graphics. 
Noi so with Phofon Paint, each 
function is explained in great detail in 
a manner which avoids ambtgutties. 
yet it isn't dauntingry massfve. 

The functions of this art utility axe 
impressive to say the least. HAM 
allows for a great deal more colours 
on screen though ihe base colours 
have to defined wrih care lo avoid 
horrible colour glitches in your 
pictures. Bearing this in mind, il is very 
easy to construct a picture containing 
more than the customary 32 colours. 
The Brush commands are extremely 
flexible making creeling complex 
perspective pictures easy, and so 
many thoughtful i ouches have been 
Incorporated so that Photon Paint 
stands head and shoulders above any 
other Amiga art utility today. 

Photon Paint requires 51 2K RAM 
minimum, 1Mbyte is recommended 
for 320 x 400 resolution mode. The 
program costs £69.99. 






TGM TX 008:7-88117/124 



S. D. C. 

309 Goldhawk Rd, Shepherds Bush, London W12 8EZ 




OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 10am-8pm 7 DAYS 



PRICE PROMISE 



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S.D.C. SOFTWARE ORDER FORM 

Please send me Ihe following titles BLOCK capitals please! 

Type of computer _ ___ 



T,rje 


Amount 
























m^^ fl^ 


Total Enclosed C 





GAMES MACHINE ( 

I 

Name „„„ W ,„., M . , „,„. I 

Address » , I 

,....., , I 

I 



Tel. No. 



Please make cheques or postal orders payable to BARGAIN SOFTWARE 

Price includes P&P within the UK, Europe please add P.OQ per disc 

Elsewhere please add £1 .50 extra per tape 







LETTERS 




"I've got an ST. r ve also owned a Spectrum 

•Inco 1983. 1 don't believe that owning 

either of these particular consumer goods 

has guaranteed me a place In heaven or 

entitles me to snigger at lees 

fortunate* . . , " 

So writes JOHN TAPPER, the first person to win 

£40 worth of software for the best letter this 

month in READERPAGE. 



THE ENDOWMENT Of 



Dear Games Machine. 
Leaking through the letters m the last lew 
issues i spotted a trend which you arso 
noticed In TGM007 Lob of people seem 
obsessed with trie type of compute* Busy 
own and how much better it is then 
everybody else's. Less people ve 
enthra l led by how wonderful computers 
el sty make are at giving us a variation 
W the meme of entertainment which. 
alter al, a what n s really alt about.. 

I must refer directly to file letter In 
TGM007 which really made me chuckle 
The one wt* the heading THE PRICE 
GAME appears to have 'been written by an 
artemauve comedian whose speciality is 
Httical comment on the materialist 
ectravapnce of modem British 
teenagers. The whole letter is awful, but 
the bit about buying an Amiga because 
(he possession oi such an article will 
«ndo* some kind of prestige or 
superiority to the owner ts brttiarffly 
idMteg. 

This, I am sure, will make all ol those 
with a simitar attitude do our friend with 
fhe Amiga positively furious I've got an 
ST. tve also owned a Spectrum since 
1963 I don't believe that owning erther of 
these particular consumer goods has 
guaranteed me a place in heaven or 
entities me to snigger al less lortunates 
f to know that l nave had a moderate 
degree of enteftatnmem value from the 
tetter. The STl have only owned lor a lew 
months but so far I am not disappointed 

How about a bit oi blasphemy - 1 don' I 
realty mind rf mere are better computers 
in existence, or even if OTHER PEOPLE 
actually own them. I think I got a good 
deal and the games thai I have seen so 
tar have impressed both myself and 1 
afters who have used my machine Gosh, 
yes. 1 do tet other people touch my status 
symbol' 

From your various replies n> the letters 
hi Readerpage I get the impression that 
you are consciously trying lo present 
computer-based entertainment as an 
part of some technological 
i, rather than a be-all-and-end-all 
pursuit subscribed to by mtndless 
keyboard freaks who have lor gotten what 
colour the sky is I think this can be lor 
the best, as a future filled with anaemic, 
obese software- junkies does not present 
me prettiest of pictures. 

I work with computers every day (IBM 
mamhames are rubbish lor writing 
arcade games on - especially in COBOL) 



and i have other leisure interests apart 
from trymg to get through Sector 3 in 
Xenon However. I can sWi claim to be 
frequently amazed at me kind of games 
(and the advances therpm thai appear m 
the shops every month What was mere 
ten years ago 7 Nothing that you could 
even begin to compare with what rs 
available now Space invaders and 
Gohrian were just beginning to appear rf 
I remember correctly I wonder it anyone 
really cared how many MPS or sound 
chips those things had, me hrst time that 
lOp dropped into the slot and untrained 
Sngers began to rap out a rhythm on left/ 
right and fire buttons' 

ft was entertainment sure enough and 
it stti is, poinded everyone keeps it in 
perspective and reads a book or kicks a 
football once in while 
John Tapper, Herefordshire 

ff'f a salutary note you sound, John. 
But hasptit always happened, fa 



every Heid ? Ht-Ft or cameras tor 
instance (not to mention video *ntf 
camcorders), that possessing madty 
prefixed or suffixed machinery - (ft* 
more LED* the better -becomesa 
form of technv-tnsatihy which 
overtakes common sense, and taste 
Cm sunt we atf have acquaintances 
who wilt fiddle for hours mth their 
145-band graphic equaliser and yet 
have never heard any Bee (ho hot, let 
atone Status Quo or anyone else . . . 



MM 89 ami SCANDAL 

OearTGM 

THE GAMES MACHINE must be one uf the 
bravest, rf not (he bravest magof all time 
I take it Barbarian (Pafacei didn't bother 
you? - doesn't look Hke it to me anyway 
- okay there were a lot of very very fussy 
people about complaining about Maria 
Whrftaker. but when those same 
interfering busy bodies who complained 
about Maria's skimpy elothirtg turn to 
page 69 trf TGM007 they re gomg to have 
heart failure 1 There she is in toll glory 
Donna 

I'vegot to hand it to you. you certainly 
know how to put some ejrcftiernefit into a 
mag. I can't want to see the arguments 
after this snapshot all l can say is good 
luck and I mean GOOD LUCK 
Darren Salisbury, Knaresborough, 
NYorfcs 



Actually, it was an accident. The art 
department here put in the wrong 
picture fweil it was worth thy.) 



But what are we going to do whnn the 
mate version of Strip Poker 2 comes 
out? 

The neat reader had a different 
approach to the shock oft 



YOU MINED THE FUN 

Dear TGM. 

The screercshot from Anco's Stnp Poker 
Z I'm not bothered That you printed i 
picture of a nude woman, but I do think 
that you should not hare printed rf 

I thought that the whole idea of the 
game was to work your way through to 
the final picture The lad that you printed 
it has mined the element of surprise for 
anybody who bought the game 

Also, Anco's sates might fail now no 
one need buy me game to see the picture 
On the other hand, there is the other gtri 
as wen as the various stages of ship to 
see. so maybe mere is reason for 
someone to buy the game 
Stuart Thomas, Pulborouqrt , W Sussex 



For those or you tammar with the 
fanzine The Bog, you might be 
interested to know that its editor wrote 
a very strong letter by Computer Trade 
Weekly complaining bitterty that we 
were aiding the cause at sexism. How 
funnily enough. Stuart you are 
implying the opposite -that by 
printing the completed picture of 
Dome we might actually prevent 
people buying fhe game, which surety 




SHU 



J Eofj 






TGM TX 008:7-88119/124 



LETTERS 




SEGA AMD MtMTEMDO 

Dear Gtmes Machine. 
I am the proud owner of a Saga consult 
and attar reading your feature on Rare 
■TGMwW) and hearing about brlWent 
Japanese games becoming available 
hart toon. 4 also bought i Ntntendo. 

AroyjughSupwAlarw^isgood. 
nrjrwoftoeomwgamasonltoNimerido 
art up to tot same standard and certainty 
aren't worth £?0- £30 

I toai toe majority of Nintendo ow«fS 
an wrong tor new game* to to 
i mooned But. when I ring a rwntendo 
problem hna i was tow no games wouW 
to released trus year ( am bagMvwtg Id 
ttw* « was a mistake buying ma consort 
Do you tova arty idaa what's going on 7 

LucMy , the Saga it a complete 
contrast They run* got too* act together 
end new games are being renond awry 
month. I have yat to find a sub-standard 
Saga game 
JanaahM Sfewaaa, Tart 




MPfiOYE SE&A COVERAGE 

Dwar Games Machine. 
( own ■ Saga, CBM 64 and Spectrum, and 
tot coverage in TGM tor via totter two la 
great 16-brt 
a perfect atl 
ol each game. But and rf* a pig out, Saga 
a>veregt is very poor There i next tow 
prewewt/news on forthcoming mas and 
rows** are scarce iwtot happaead to 
Fantasy Za*ZKijngfvW>\ Of course 
Ian aware you can onry review toe 
tool you are supptod wHi, If you 



you could be suppaadwWi a review copy 



I Btoo pm purchased a rwntando and i 
am of course interested in reading aboul 
i, but your coverage » patnabc ho 
prevtawsAwwa, onfy two reviews aver! 
Surety rare are tome new game* bang 
rataaaai (I heat aa at I am watting lor 
toaaanawaraaMconwarstonaandingpe 
I toven't just waited El 00 00.) 
Serf m Petty, Leads* Kit 




CUTEY POO AMD THE KAMIKAZE QJfrMEA PK; 




YOU SHOUW MOVE AWAY 

from a- an 

Dear Games Machina. 

I have just sent you toe Questwnairr/ 

iT&MOObTj and can't do but add some 
Comments 

1 am an Alan ST owner and a TGM 
Subscriber since tasue 4 I want my 
computer to be in r*tortair»m*rrt, and 
therefore I ike computer games and buy 
« computer garnet magaitoa hoping to 
gat features Hut news, previews. 
ravwws.maps.nmts Others like 
Mat's reports or Info Desk add to maim a 
goto magawie fiutdon I go wrong -wte 
CiWdnt-and leave out non-computer 



I totaMy agree wWi Nigel Routt 
(TG*a»Ji) y«j should move away to just 
toe 1 &-bri machines. Thare are a tot of 
magazines covering toe B-brt market 
and i don't dunk you can compete - 
perhaps you don't want to - with 
magazines *k* CRASH and ZZAPfct 



IMksw j*w Joot torawpa Mai ajanejen 

mmrsM 

err '#-*«. we aw 



COMPARING PRESENTA1I0H 

Dear Gamat Machine. 

Why ire people never happy unbl toey 

have scmelhtng to complain about Yes . 

even I'm complaining about people 

cempiatmng 

No offence to Dawd Btcfc T&MOO* 
but why does TGM have to be ekeZZAP' 
and CRASH ki rts presentation? Whan I 
first heard TGM was coming out I thought 
■great. I can't wart to sua what tots 
I to like I wasn't 
A totally drfterartl approach 
from any of Newshsid's other mags A 
mora mature look at a more mature range 
of compute* I'm not knocking ZZAP and 
CRASH, as they art aimed at a younger 
sectnnof the public That show it comes 
across to me anyway 

I find the layout and base presentation 
ol mt magazine vary eety to Wtow end 
very pleasing No dtstractons to toe eye, 
Just straight talk and good articles 

\ am not opposed to improving toe 
magazine, but I wouW jutl bke to ttrett 
that I find toe magazine formal al present 
vary acceptable Why noes it have to to 
fancy 1 Oh by rjie way. if you do have 
trouble finding articles n your magnta 
Dawd. try using tto indent the start, very 



WHAT DO you 3UTPD3E 

Thi* enrols n roc? 



!£U*L 




Ca 



re 



Mi 
Jfftaf 



wart-afytwaaiwAw 
•/He 






ret to* 



IsWarZUff fcraaMSj 



AM UMMEROFLHIY AAWOTED 
WOMAN WHITES 

Dear Guys go down a space no don't write 
it do it 

What are you trying to pull tort? I'm 
talking make tors capitals bad publicity 

underline that no that fever there oh 

fergat rt no rts too lata now, 

New paragraph no ■don't write 
ObgodyouSiWyoWlofjIletnied 
Sorry about thai I was trying to dictate 
to Dad. 

Anyway, this is the second bme you've 
pnntad a letter by some semi-irtente 
wwnp ('mega-naff' and 'brtf' . well, 
says it all. doesn't rt?) who ftnde my 
adventures less than interesting What 
about ait toe ones you get sngmg my 
pranet? I know you do get them, and you 
wont find one lapse of bad taste n any 
of them, just good solid verbal applause 
ProtoWy Wei. how could I know, I ridnl 
wnta them. You could prove it 

Blimey, it s bad enough towng 
Croucher making me ten rum my Woody 
Hf* story once a month when I've got 
other things to worry about, and raving 
that other skinny tour-eyed Matron 
knkalika looming over me wtlh haj 
scabby sketch pad ail toe tome without 
Bus garbage from your tot 

l" II go and rub mysetf up against one ol 
the toady magaimts editors rl I have any 
more ol your old buck, than what sflty 
soot youii al took. 
LOtsaLnr 
Mercy 




t%. There's too much about Computer 

Garnet in TGM, Seems to be on every 

page Can we nave mere on beauty tips 

and Welsh Rugger? Oh - and a bad pub 

guide. 

WS. I Suppose Cutey Poo is quite funny 



LETS HEAR FROM WE 

iMTERESJiMG peons 

Dear Games Machine 
What can I say? Your magajme othe best 
I have ever lad eyes on h is very 
mtormative m rts reviews and articles 
and uses eye-catching, yet not gaudy 
colours to com*? its message to 
comparison to other magazines ft rj in a 
class at its own, as are ai toe NewsfWd 
magazines 

I tovt bought your magazines since 
issue one. and have both anpyed and 
K r tf Wet d Ovary page My ravoumes 
bemg the letters pages and your reviews. 

One thmg i cannot understand « the 
constant feudtog between ST and Amiga 
Owners Why every month must *e sutler 
enotess moans aoout which o better? 
You should rename m« pages "i 6- &n 
Feud' Ttonmey can air their mews there, 
mstead of hijadung the fetters page Why 
can't we have informative humorous 
letters to fid our Irves with hope and fjf 

I KM it toat TGM is rut |ust a computer 
magazine It mcorporates other subjects 
like boardgames and tutore tochnotogy 
So why ton t we sea unare on these 
subjects, that might amuse us or inform 
\&-> I'd like to mad aoout other things 
instead of complaints about software 
pneesand standards, and t6-brtc 



four* tight Oommick, OmwttouUam 
JM&trv en luoyevbi other aaae 
amft it tf fmm. Ptrtupt Staml 
Wynim't tmrturw on Cytmpunk migM 
apart torn corrtrmwrsy, ana what 
m Ml iwHiBfj aw JseTx 
boat* tmmtbgtbmt 



We need your Input to REAOERPAGE 
because it's yours to fill. Best letter each 
month In the opinion of the team wins Its 
sender £40 worth of software. Write to: 
REAOERPAGE, THE GAMES MACHINE, PO 
BOX 10, LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE SYS 1DB. 



130/1 24 TGM TX 008:7-88 



HELP 



INFORMATION 




Robin Hogg sifts through your letters once 
more and conies up with answers to 
burning questions 



i rahamam, London, asks about the 
Saga consoie system. 

■ What is the rrystenOuS extension 
compartment at the base of my 
Sega control deck lor? The 
console's instructions offer no help. 

It's ■ form of interface. Sega ere 
looking into ways of using the 
extension compartment with future 
peripherals. There's certainty 
nothing at trie moment 

wm Mewson, of Tottenham. 
London (my favourite football teem) 



a I've become aware of the shortage 
of computer chips and subsequent 
once increase* of computers like 
Are ST. Why is this happening? 

American manufacturers of 
Dynamic HAM (DRAM) chips used 
in many home computers (Atari and 
Amstrad certainty} raised their 
prices following trade restrictions 
against cheaper Japanese chips- 
Computer manufacturers unwilling 
to buy at higher prices are now 
tJperian o og a shortage. Atari has 
switched to the mora expensive V- 
RAM (Video RAM) chips, hence the 
ST price increase to £400, Amstrad, 
too, has been forced to raise prices. 
Commodore era keeping Amiga 
prices steady, seemingly 

unaffected by chip shortage*. If you 
look around, you can still get some 
machines at old prices, but Atari's 
new offer (over £400 worth of free 
software with the (399,99 520 
5TFM) is axceaenl in its own right 

owirpunjH, Stowmerfcet* Suffolk 
his ■ simple question . . . 

a What exactly are TV modulators, 
and what are they for*? 

TV modulators are necessary for 
machines, such as the Amiga and 
ST, intended to operate with high 
quality RGB output monitors. 
Tel e v is ions, by contrast, use a 
cruder Rf composite video output 

I I. II ■! jj I I ■ !■ W m*M^ m i^st^u. — — 

■Wwiors neve a rawer screen 
update, about flOhz, so a signal 
intended for one must be stepped 
down to operate TVs which run at 
ontyMhi. 

Liverpudlian nut* fuhehty has 
written enquiring about the Amiga. 

■ Can you plug replacement CPUs 
such as the MC 68010 straight m, 
or does the Amiga need to be 
opened up? if the chip I* installed. 



is it possible lo switch between 
68000 and replacement chip? Does 
it operate at a faster rate than the 
68000'? 

In fact the MC 68010 is s straight 
replacement for the Amiga CPU 
chip. Fitting naturally requires 
opening up the machine - voiding 
the warranty. 

The Amiga Centre in Scotland 
(031 -557-4242) is working on an 
interface allowing the Amiga 500 to 
hold a 68000 chip, and more 
powerful chips such as the 6802Q. 
Whether it will be possible to switch 
between chips is another matter. 
The Amiga 2000 already has special 
expansion slots allowing other 
parallel coprocessors to be added, 
giving a dramatic Increase in speed. 

Russ also wants to know 
when... 

■ ... is Elite from Firebird coming 
out on the Amiga? 

It's planned to follow an ST release 
later this year. No firm release date 
or price yet. 

Moving overseas, itamah 
elhahamt. a member of a large Israeli 
Amiga Users' club, isn't asking 
about Am i gas but about wrist - 
watches, of ell things, 

■ Have you any information on 
Seiko's RC4000 wnst-computer, 
and could I have Seiko's address? 

Claimed as the world's smallest 
computer terminal, the RC 4000 can 
receive/transmit information from/ 
to IBM PCs, Spectrum?, 
Commodore 64/1 28s. Apple II 
series and the BBC range. The 
watch stores data up to 2K and 
scrolls i\ across the watchface as 
24- character pages; up lo SO pages 
containing soma 2,000 characters 
(or quarter of a TGM page.) The 
alarm can be set for 60 events per 
year In advance, or on a dally basis 
- though this shortens the two-year 
battery lifespan. 

The address: Seiko, Hattc-ri 
UK Ltd. Hattori Mouse, Vanwall 
Road, Maidenhead, Berkshire 
SL6 4UW 
« 10626)770001. 

ouv shaw, Cleethorpes. South 
Humberside and stacfy who, Goffs 
Oak, Hertfordshire both ask . , . 

■ Where can you get leads lo connect 
an Amiga to a hi-fi. enabling stereo 

sound? 



Take a look in TGM's Mail Order 
section (pages 109-1 13) this month; 
you Should Tlnd an Amiga Stereo 
Sound tut on offer for the princely 
sum of £9.95. allowing a link from 
your machine to most hi-fis 
(including your Amstrad MS-45 
Gary!), 

In TGM007 Reederpage, stiffen 
tamo asked Jon Bates which 
machine, ST or Amiga, is best for 
syfflhestsing musk, speech and 
connecting up to MIDI instruments. 
Stephen also wanted to know which 
has the best sound qualities on TVs 
and monitors. Take it away 
John.. . 

As mosf. monitors have the sonic 
quality of a wasp in a tobacco tin, 
external amplification is fairly 
essential, which la easier done on 
the Amiga - and it's also in stereo. 
Ho wever, the ST has buitt-ln MIDI 
ports and could save you a lot on 
buying the necessary interface. 
Alio there's much mors ST MIDI 
software available, although it can 
cost anything up to £500. The actual 
quality of the content of the 
software on both machine* is pretty 
even, but it ail depends on how you 
see your micro functioning - ejfher 
as a stand-atone unit (Amiga; or as 
a centre for musical control with a 
wide software base (Atari ST.} I 
suggest you keep your eyes glued 
to the music pages for further 
reviews of packages for both 
machines. 

A quick tip for Melbourne House's 
Xenon t rom rod williams of Bamet in 
Hertfordshire. 



suitable for printing documents and 
invoices ctearty? I would also wsrri 
it to port compiler graphics from 
art packages such as Degas Stf* 
and Neochnyne 

Epson set a much-cloned standard 
for dot matrix printers, ff you have 
fsf Word, for instance, a preset 
Epson FX-80 print-driver is 
inevitably included on the disk. 
Colour is a rarer, more expensive, 
commodity. Until recently one of the 
cheapest was the Juki 551 (or £31 
with a colour kit for an additional 
£66. Now there's a new Star printer, 
the LC-10, at E259 with colour. It has 
quick draft and slower NLQ (Near 
Letter Quality) mode, which gives 
excellent results. If you fit the four- 
colour print ribbon you get slow, but 
reasonable output though care 
should be taken not lo let the ribbon 
gat dirty. Degas Elite only comes 
with a driver for an Epson colour 
printer which, according to 
Electronic Arts, won't work 
perfectly with the Star. To get a 
better prinl-dn ver. they recommend 
you contact on* at the bigger User 
Groups, such as CompuServe in the 
US (S 01 01 -014-457-6650) 
Electronic Arts is considering a 
wider range of print- drivers. 

The final two questions this 
month are from paw. hahthen, 
Stalybndge, Cheshire. 

■ Is there, or will there be. an art 
package for the Sega consde? If 
so, are Ihere any plans for a printer 

to be used wrth the console'' 




Stnnd up fp tA# santimtf In Xenon - ST 9W«n 



■ in sector 2, defeal the first sentinel 
arid then c^SSh the Ship into the side 
wall, losing all energy. When the 
nexi ship comes along, an the aliens 
are gone and you only have the 
sentinel to bean 

D smtth, Bayleigh, Essex owns an 
Atari ST and Is thinking of 
purchasing a printer , . . 

■ Can you recommend a dot matnx 
printer around the £200- £250 mark 



No is the simple answer. A Saga 
printer would be most unlikely 
considering the lack ol an effective 
on -board storage medium and the 
console's general inflexibility 
compared to home computers. 
If you have queries concerning 
computers and electronic 

entertainment write to 

INFORMATION DESK, THE GAMES 
MACHINE, PO Box to, Ludlow. 
Shropshire SY8 1DB. You can also 
computer MBX us with ID TGM 



TGM TX 008:7-86121/124 



END 



UNCLE MEL'S TRIVIA QUIZ 



It look a lot Oils month to drag htm away from tils 
keyboard, modem and phono and several sessions 
of computerised heavy breathing on many bulletin 
but finally, bored of bawds the bard of bull 
up with yet another entirely trivial quiz to test 
your reflexes and prove again that you are a Parson 
Renowned In Computer Knowledge (17 out of 20 
that hi). 



1 ) What makes the ' Thor ' compact 

disc remgrkabte? 

2) Who said: 'I hate computers as 
much as I hate peanuts. But I can't 
stop eat mg peanuts* ' a) HG Wells, 
b) Orson Weils, c) Kylie Minogue 

3) Where would you find *Drak". 
Drax' and "Dross'? 

4) Which software houses can you 

find lurking in FJB DIRER, PISSV 
SNOG and DAM RN SLAG? 



S) What have Paul Daniels and Bob 
Holne$s got m common? aj 
ludicrous hairpieces, b) ludicrous 
salaries, c) ludicrous Domark 







6} Who is this person, and does 
his name rhyme with a) catchin", 



b) 'bracken", c) prawn' 

7) if Clair -Voyance means 'seeing 
clearly", and Sinclair means 

' obscured ", why is Sir Chve'a 
surname Sinclair? 

8) J n thai case, why did ihe Clair- 
voyant cross the road 7 



9) Last year, did Alan's employees 
generate more Or less than 
£ 100.000 each? 



10) Last year, did IBM make more 
or less than Atari per employee? 

1 1) In what year did Herman 
Hollerith give birth to IBM? a) 
1890 b) 1 930. C) 1970 



12) Whal four-letter- word 
beginning with 'C am I thinking 
of? Clues: Strip Poker ft has a 
dicjilised one. Rod Cousens has a 
cute little golden one and I am one. 

13) What is a 'quintal 1 ? 



14) How many Martian Pubs does 
it take 10 change a floppy d<sk? 



16) Where would you 1<nd Roland 
neat io a Prophet? 



10) Why is Piranha Software like 
cortus inierruptos? 



17) True or false*> US Gold's hero 
Charlie Chaplin had his corpse 
stolen in real life. 



18) Whal did the House of Lords 
decide last Apnl? a) convicted 
hackers should be hung, b) 
hacking is punishable under the 
Copyright Act. c) hacking is 

togal 



19) Apart from very silly names, 
what do Iggy Rock and Zowie 
Scott have in common? 



20) What sort of a creature is 
Mercy Dash's Rover 



ANSWERS: 



jeeq 
jejod e to eiym e sde us ' jeteeiuB 
ue VJeeuse 'opope 'qsijpsobe (oj; 

japuptueies 

s.'ujeuox jo sjeuiujejfiOJd (61 

aouajjo reuiujijo e 



f3ui>pet| ©m«ui oi mei am ui bdublj:) 

s peoueujujcoej osie ji - (o fei 

i,auje6 am 

|o pu i»6 om op «om »ou arui U. i 

UWB^pMtiM 

mou -nam pen utoq 9r>.Mm (si 

jauiOO H*«d sp^H Ajqissod 

>o 'sieziseu.Ms <o ipej e uq (s t 

te|d oi euo puc 

isaj oi euo 'juomoi euo eejm(ti 

(uaeiuois 



s.jseg uiii jo) sojim qoi let 

(l> iteds noA mom 

s.iem mwi | tse©] je) .pjgq, b fc|. 

0691 (■ (It 

Moeeo00 5El3 

a etdoed qoo'Oqp iuojjh uoihiuj 

0OO'«3 :euteseqt Anoexa tot 

upeeQ0Q'S£i3 - etdoed 

00Z E w°-*J uoijiiuj 0OS3 :exw (6 

epfS jeuio euji oi ia6 o± (s 

jiepu»s 



sew euieu s.pep tig esneqeg (i 

.uweid. giiw seujAip 

oum 'uaupeqs n&w s,>uBujog (g 

Acq pjO A|ain|oSqv (s 

UJStSpUBJO 

due s?sou6Asd "piiqeii j (* 
, idg Sjunoo3tf jwSjO 

sai»Muosjoia(s 

ueujv 'MAO pus jeAe 

joj n pjcooj pue eseje ueo nox (l 



NEXT 
MONTH 

IN THE GAMES MACHINE! 



■ THE CES SHOW 

As we go to press, Marshal T Rosenthal 15 at ihe CES show In 
Chicago to report on the U S N mtendo boom . Over 40 companies 
will be promoting Nintendo Software - and we reveal the 1 6-b(t 
Nintendo; read our six-page coverage and yeam 



DRAGON'S LAIR - THE LASER DISC 

The classic cartoon-style arcade adventure is to be made 
commercially available We take a look at the hardware required 
and let the review team loose on the oame- 



PARSEC PIXEL 

We promised it for this month, but it didn't turn up in time 
However, the utility is too good to miss and you do deserve the 
best - so were promising it again . . . next month. Keep 
everything crossed! 



I ACCUSE 

Met Croucher investigates behind Star Wars, Sack ToTfte Future 
and Btaderunrmr . , . were they original or has it an been done 
before? 



CYBERPUNK 

Stuart Wynne continues detving into the filthy habrts of 
cyberpunks 



PLUS THE GAMES MACHINE'S effervescent look at the very 
latest m reviews - (is there anything out there to beat Dark Sidef) 
- previews, adventures, boardgames. rolepiay. play by mail, 
competitions. lechno-gadgets. graphics, not to mention Jon 
Bates and his MSX music special. Don't Miss Something Xellent. 
TGMG0& hits the streets on July 21 



ADVERTISERS' 


INDEX 


MontbuiMLtd 48.4$ 
Nebula* 41 
Oc«an 20.21.82,83.123.0/0 


Bargain Software 


na 


Beau Joiiy 


37 


Prtem Leisure 13 


C .is tie Computers 


60 


Silica Shop 66 


Creative Devices 


93 


Softoh 2.3 


Evesham Micro* 


98 


Target Game* 4 1 


Grandsiam Entertainment 


TGM Mail Order /Subs i09 ' 


Gremlin Graphics 


6.66.69 


Timesoft 105 


Holistic Engineering 


41 


Trubridge 


Irrfogrames 


73 


US Gold 22.24.25.67.88 


Johnson Scanilron 


96 


"•ran 32 


KJCGamss 


106 


Video Vault 50 


LortoM* 


4 


Worldwide Software 100 


Midland Bank 


14,15 


WTS Electron** 41 

1 



122/1 24 TGM IX 008:7-88 



/m/f 


' 




1 1 2 


£$■// 


' 




C04NOP 




Immensely impres: 
* addictive sequel and tak 
format into previously uncharted areas 
excel lence A classic 
Your Sinclair 



V**\ 



presentation 
cements and 
lay, and you 



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SPECTRUM CASS C7 95 

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Adding to thm fun and exutamant of Afkmnoia AH nrw fuaturm* tnchidm *n& 
ChOKttio \r*stiumct9a**th*i£remn options, manymntta VAUS trffetts. multiple shot* and a imcrat additional aitwn to contund with Thts 
mttd* up to tho matt tariffing fraction grnmw stncv A&XA HOtO out with id many itnpeavmcrwnts you just won 't torn Mbtm to Stop playing 




6 CENTRAL STREET MANCHESTER M2 5NS ■ TELEPHONE 061 834 3939 TELEX 669977 fAX Q6i 8340650 




Or-MAn ftrtHwarp I fcnWw r l - fi f JfTfta! .^h-Mt ■ Maiyhnrtnf ■ HA? VJ<t lolani-w-irui fWI irVSMfn. ■Ua.fiSaffnnrfiMC.r.